Anglicans are Protestants?

PJ

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Melodist said:
Peter J said:
Melodist said:
Historically, Anglicanism is not a product of the reformation
Well, the fact that they aren't in communion with Rome is a product of the reformation.
Not really, England could have cut communion with Rome without accepting Protestant beliefs, which were not the reason for the schism and didn't find their way into their teaching until after communion had already been broken. The king wanted a divorce and the archbishop chose giving the king his way over maintaining communion with Rome. The real theological differences didn't come until afterward, more political than anything.
I should have worded my last post a little different. Yes, Henry was the reason for the initial break between Rome and Canterbury; but the fact that full communion wasn't reestablished was largely due to the Reformation -- and to some extent the Counter-Reformation. (In fact, communion was reestablished, briefly, during the reign of Bloody Mary, a.k.a. Mary the Good, right?)
 

genesisone

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Interestingly in the oath taken by the sovereign at the Coronation we have:
Archbishop: Will you to the utmost of your power maintain the Laws of God and the true profession of the Gospel? Will you to the utmost of your power maintain in the United Kingdom the Protestant Reformed Religion established by law? Will you maintain and preserve inviolably the settlement of the Church of England, and the doctrine, worship, discipline, and government thereof, as by law established in England? And will you preserve unto the Bishops and Clergy of England, and to the Churches there committed to their charge, all such rights and privileges, as by law do or shall appertain to them or any of them?
(http://www.royal.gov.uk/royaleventsandceremonies/coronation/coronation.aspx)
 

Doubting Thomas

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Gorazd said:
There are all kinds of people in the Anglican Church, Protestants, Anglo-Catholics, even Anglo-Papalists or whatever.
Yep (and I say this as an Anglican)
 

PJ

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Peter J said:
Gamliel said:
For most of my life I thought they were protestant since they broke away from the Pope, but I know a priest who would consider Anglicans to more Catholic than anything.
I was thinking about also providing a link to Two heads are better than one, from the same blog. Your post just provided a nice lead-in.  :)

In a recent conversation behind the scenes, via email, a very sincere fellow has been trying to convince me that Anglicanism is a "two-headed monster." It is the same old worn-out argument that the Elizabethan Settlement (as if they understood it) was flawed from the start, because, golly gee whiz, you just can't be both Catholic and Protestant.
P.S. To be honest, I'm a bit skeptical of Fr. Hart's assertion that one can be both Protestant and Catholic (not to be confused with the idea that the Anglican Communion contains some who and Protestant and some who are Catholic).
 

Doubting Thomas

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Peter J said:
Peter J said:
Gamliel said:
For most of my life I thought they were protestant since they broke away from the Pope, but I know a priest who would consider Anglicans to more Catholic than anything.
I was thinking about also providing a link to Two heads are better than one, from the same blog. Your post just provided a nice lead-in.  :)

In a recent conversation behind the scenes, via email, a very sincere fellow has been trying to convince me that Anglicanism is a "two-headed monster." It is the same old worn-out argument that the Elizabethan Settlement (as if they understood it) was flawed from the start, because, golly gee whiz, you just can't be both Catholic and Protestant.
P.S. To be honest, I'm a bit skeptical of Fr. Hart's assertion that one can be both Protestant and Catholic (not to be confused with the idea that the Anglican Communion contains some who and Protestant and some who are Catholic).
As the terms are used by him, and by many others in the classical Anglican tradition, I think one CAN be both (I consider myself such).  One can be reformed Catholic and patristically Protestant (ie protesting the medieval Roman deviations from the ancient catholic consensus).  Of course, many others are NON-patristically Protestant, in which case it would be incorrect to call such folks 'Catholic'.  ;D
 

PJ

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Doubting Thomas said:
Peter J said:
Peter J said:
Gamliel said:
For most of my life I thought they were protestant since they broke away from the Pope, but I know a priest who would consider Anglicans to more Catholic than anything.
I was thinking about also providing a link to Two heads are better than one, from the same blog. Your post just provided a nice lead-in.  :)

In a recent conversation behind the scenes, via email, a very sincere fellow has been trying to convince me that Anglicanism is a "two-headed monster." It is the same old worn-out argument that the Elizabethan Settlement (as if they understood it) was flawed from the start, because, golly gee whiz, you just can't be both Catholic and Protestant.
P.S. To be honest, I'm a bit skeptical of Fr. Hart's assertion that one can be both Protestant and Catholic (not to be confused with the idea that the Anglican Communion contains some who and Protestant and some who are Catholic).
As the terms are used by him, and by many others in the classical Anglican tradition, I think one CAN be both (I consider myself such).  One can be reformed Catholic and patristically Protestant (ie protesting the medieval Roman deviations from the ancient catholic consensus).  Of course, many others are NON-patristically Protestant, in which case it would be incorrect to call such folks 'Catholic'.  ;D
The way I think of "Catholic" and "Protestant" may be partially force of habit -- heck, for the first couple decades of my life, I understood "Catholic" to mean strictly the Roman Communion. But consider this: don't Anglicans themselves, by using the terms "high church" and "low church", imply that you can't be both?
 

Doubting Thomas

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Peter J said:
The way I think of "Catholic" and "Protestant" may be partially force of habit -- heck, for the first couple decades of my life, I understood "Catholic" to mean strictly the Roman Communion. But consider this: don't Anglicans themselves, by using the terms "high church" and "low church", imply that you can't be both?
Again, I guess that depends on how one defines those two terms.  There are certainly those low church Anglo-Calvinists who would probably agree with that (and some Anglo-Catholics, especially Anglo-Papalists, from the other end would agree with that as well.)
 
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