• Please remember: Pray for Ukraine in the Prayer forum; Share news in the Christian News section; Discuss religious implications in FFA: Religious Topics; Discuss political implications in Politics (and if you don't have access, PM me) Thank you! + Fr. George, Forum Administrator

Are fantasy video games ok for Orthodox Christians?

Jackson02

OC.Net Guru
Joined
May 5, 2017
Messages
1,014
Reaction score
1
Points
0
Location
United States
I'm a big gamer And I know it may sound like a silly question, but can Orthodox Christians play video games with magic in them?
 

Arachne

Matriarch
Staff member
Moderator
Site Supporter
Joined
Dec 22, 2012
Messages
13,021
Reaction score
701
Points
113
Age
50
Location
Camulodunum
Faith
Cradle Greek Orthodox. Cope.
Jurisdiction
Antiochian Archdiocese, UK
Yes.

We are encouraged to develop discernment, which includes being able to separate fact from fiction.
 

William T

Archon
Joined
May 22, 2015
Messages
2,545
Reaction score
2
Points
0
Age
39
Location
Chicago
Faith
Orthodox
Jurisdiction
Antioch
yes.  It's good that you are exploring Orthodoxy.  But try not to let your new found zeal get swept up into a kind of fundamentalist perspective.  That's going to end up alienating you.  Never forget your family, friends, job, life activities.  These are the people that formed you.  Orthodoxy isn't a cult.
 

Porter ODoran

Toumarches
Joined
May 8, 2014
Messages
12,135
Reaction score
6
Points
38
Age
50
Location
Eugene, OR
Faith
Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction
GOAA
William T said:
yes.  It's good that you are exploring Orthodoxy.  But try not to let your new found zeal get swept up into a kind of fundamentalist perspective.  That's going to end up alienating you.  Never forget your family, friends, job, life activities.  These are the people that formed you.  Orthodoxy isn't a cult.
God is who formed and is still forming you. Seek the mind of Christ if you hope to be saved; the imagination can sicken and kill.
 

Porter ODoran

Toumarches
Joined
May 8, 2014
Messages
12,135
Reaction score
6
Points
38
Age
50
Location
Eugene, OR
Faith
Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction
GOAA
Arachne said:
Yes.

We are encouraged to develop discernment, which includes being able to separate fact from fiction.
A specious remark, at least without further development, but let's take it as a given. One learns to distinguish substances by their suitability for food, but one does not consume all substances in the process. One also grows beyond the need to be continually making the discernment.
 

vamrat

Merarches
Joined
Jun 4, 2010
Messages
9,471
Reaction score
0
Points
36
Age
38
Location
Omaha
Faith
Serbian Orthodox
Jurisdiction
Diocese of New Gracanica
This is a serious question and requires a nuanced answer.

What types of games are you playing?  If we are talking about Vermintide or Warhammer Total War you are cool.

Anything else is forbidden, but its a moot point.  Why would you play other games anyway?
 

minasoliman

Stratopedarches
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
May 24, 2004
Messages
20,198
Reaction score
8
Points
38
Location
NJ
Faith
Oriental Orthodox
Jurisdiction
Coptic
vamrat said:
This is a serious question and requires a nuanced answer.

What types of games are you playing?  If we are talking about Vermintide or Warhammer Total War you are cool.

Anything else is forbidden, but its a moot point.  Why would you play other games anyway?
I have no idea what those are, but I still chuckled  ;D
 

Rohzek

OC.Net Guru
Joined
Aug 26, 2015
Messages
1,364
Reaction score
1
Points
0
Video games are a wonderful experience. In the end, it comes down to how you enjoy them. If you play Final Fantasy and finish it with the conviction that Shiva is a real goddess and eidolon who will turn your enemies into ice for you, then not only are you doing it wrong but you probably have some mental issues. If you finish Final Fantasy and just enjoyed the challenge, the experience, the escapism, and perhaps even learned some higher moral lesson, then you are doing it right.

In short, what William T and Arachne have already said.
 

Arachne

Matriarch
Staff member
Moderator
Site Supporter
Joined
Dec 22, 2012
Messages
13,021
Reaction score
701
Points
113
Age
50
Location
Camulodunum
Faith
Cradle Greek Orthodox. Cope.
Jurisdiction
Antiochian Archdiocese, UK
Porter ODoran said:
Arachne said:
Yes.

We are encouraged to develop discernment, which includes being able to separate fact from fiction.
A specious remark, at least without further development, but let's take it as a given. One learns to distinguish substances by their suitability for food, but one does not consume all substances in the process.
One can certainly rely on the experiences of others. Hence, asking the question.

Porter ODoran said:
One also grows beyond the need to be continually making the discernment.
One needs to acquire a skill before outgrowing it. Baby steps.
 

Gunnarr

Archon
Joined
Jun 19, 2011
Messages
2,113
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
29
how big of a gamer are you really? how many hours a day do you play video games?



I used to play a lot of video games. But think of it.

It is like sitting around playing cards for hours everyday. Do you think God really wants us to be doing that? Be careful not to become addicted to them.

Magic, violence, sexuality, there are many things in video games which are debased and they wont help you get any closer to God, only further. So if you play video games, at least do not allow yourself to ever see it as virtuous. They are essentially time wasters of unproductive result if you play them for too long.


I know you probably wont listen to this advice because I know how it feels, but I say this as one "gamer" to another. I know people don't like to hear anything condemning their stress reliever/escape/toy
 

Gunnarr

Archon
Joined
Jun 19, 2011
Messages
2,113
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
29
One time I contemplated Dungeons and Dragons. I liked the idea of it. The game rules and all the "lore" is very interesting.

But I thought to myself. Theoretically I could be dressing up as someone else, like some actor, and pretending to be them. I would be role playing as some magic firing wizard. Or I would be role playing as some violent cleric with a mace, who worships a made up deity.

It's just not helpful at all to faith it would only damage it. So I decided not to play
 

Iconodule

Hoplitarches
Joined
Jan 2, 2010
Messages
16,486
Reaction score
23
Points
38
Age
40
Location
PA, USA
Faith
Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction
Patriarchate of Johnstown
I don't think a fact/ fiction distinction is very meaningful in determining the worth or suitability of an activity. Anything that occupies the mind for a given period of time becomes part of its reality. Even if a dragon is imaginary, you still spent an hour with it. Simply saying, "Well, it's not real" is like wearing a flak jacket to prevent oneself from drowning. A more pertinent question, for any kind of art, is whether it's actually any good, and what sort of thoughts- moral, aesthetic, etc- are conveyed and whether they are complementary to a Christian conscience. And that discernment must be exercised on a case by case basis.
 

Rohzek

OC.Net Guru
Joined
Aug 26, 2015
Messages
1,364
Reaction score
1
Points
0
If you're looking for a view on how to appreciate art, even when it doesn't lead one to contemplate a "higher idea," then I suggest reading Edmund Burke's A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful. The best edition is the Oxford World Classics edited and introduced by Paul Guyer.
 

Asteriktos

Strategos
Joined
Oct 4, 2002
Messages
40,176
Reaction score
668
Points
113
Faith
-
Jurisdiction
-
There are a wide variety of so-called "walking simulators" on the market today, which you may find yourself enjoying. You can play them before you make up your mind whether they are good. As for magic, just pretend the good magic are miracles from God, and the baddy magic is from demons. Thus video games are 'baptized' and rendered acceptable to even the most vociferous critics (Roger Ebert).
 

Porter ODoran

Toumarches
Joined
May 8, 2014
Messages
12,135
Reaction score
6
Points
38
Age
50
Location
Eugene, OR
Faith
Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction
GOAA
Asteriktos said:
There are a wide variety of so-called "walking simulators" on the market today, which you may find yourself enjoying. You can play them before you make up your mind whether they are good. As for magic, just pretend the good magic are miracles from God, and the baddy magic is from demons. Thus video games are 'baptized' and rendered acceptable to even the most vociferous critics (Roger Ebert).
Gosh, Justin.
 

Asteriktos

Strategos
Joined
Oct 4, 2002
Messages
40,176
Reaction score
668
Points
113
Faith
-
Jurisdiction
-
The Bible has talking donkeys, TV talking horses, movies talking vampires, books talking dragons, so why not vidyo games?
 

William T

Archon
Joined
May 22, 2015
Messages
2,545
Reaction score
2
Points
0
Age
39
Location
Chicago
Faith
Orthodox
Jurisdiction
Antioch
Iconodule said:
I don't think a fact/ fiction distinction is very meaningful in determining the worth or suitability of an activity. Anything that occupies the mind for a given period of time becomes part of its reality. Even if a dragon is imaginary, you still spent an hour with it. Simply saying, "Well, it's not real" is like wearing a flak jacket to prevent oneself from drowning. A more pertinent question, for any kind of art, is whether it's actually any good, and what sort of thoughts- moral, aesthetic, etc- are conveyed and whether they are complementary to a Christian conscience. And that discernment must be exercised on a case by case basis.
I think too it can be written what exactly the Fathers, the Church, or classic philosophy means by the word passions and fantasy isn't exactly what's being talked about here (though I don't have the wherewithal to spend time defending that position if it comes under scrutiny...one can certainly study on their own what is being talked about what the Fathers meant by these things).

I think it is fine to assume that most people who listen to Led Zeppelin aren't expecting to and the vast majority will not take up the dark arts of Crowley, etc...and the people that do probably have issues already, much as the people who will read books in the Bible and come up with some pretty fantastic and deranged interpretations.

PS:  There was no good Samaritan, he was a figment of the imagination.  Can a man play a chess game?

For the shorthand: I think it may be best to look at warnings of falling into delusion may be closer to brainwashing tactics of cults, or the hubris and pride of someone like Anakin Skywalker (from the fantasy series Star Wars) gets sucked into when dealing with the world.  Video games, movies, etc are neutral in relation to all this.  A person with such a mindset will probably get sucked in by drugs if not by movies, music if not sucked in by drugs, ,  religion if not sucked in by music, politics if not sucked in by religion, philosophy if not sucked in by politics, etc....it's the disposition and mettle of the man that is what is at fault.
 

Iconodule

Hoplitarches
Joined
Jan 2, 2010
Messages
16,486
Reaction score
23
Points
38
Age
40
Location
PA, USA
Faith
Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction
Patriarchate of Johnstown
Something I like to cite often, from the book Wounded by Love about Elder Porphyrios:

At one point we stood before a statue of Zeus. Zeus was on his throne and was in the act of hurling a thunderbolt at mankind. Once the guide had finished telling them what she knew, she turned to me and said: 'What do you have to say about this, Pappouli? How do you see the statue?'

'I don't know much about these things,' I said. 'But as I see it, I marvel at the work of the artist and also at the human form, such a perfect divine creation. And I see that the artist who made it had a great sense of the divine. Look at Zeus. Although he is hurling his thunderbolt at mankind, yet his face is serene. He is not angry. He is impassionate.'


On the surface level (which, in certain contexts, is important) Zeus is, of course, an idol, and Saint Porphyrios has no sympathy with idolatry. But he is able to look at this pagan statue and find that it says something about the true God. This is very different from an attitude toward art where everything needs to directly promote or correspond with someone's religion or ideology.
 

William T

Archon
Joined
May 22, 2015
Messages
2,545
Reaction score
2
Points
0
Age
39
Location
Chicago
Faith
Orthodox
Jurisdiction
Antioch
Iconodule said:
Something I like to cite often, from the book Wounded by Love about Elder Porphyrios:

At one point we stood before a statue of Zeus. Zeus was on his throne and was in the act of hurling a thunderbolt at mankind. Once the guide had finished telling them what she knew, she turned to me and said: 'What do you have to say about this, Pappouli? How do you see the statue?'

'I don't know much about these things,' I said. 'But as I see it, I marvel at the work of the artist and also at the human form, such a perfect divine creation. And I see that the artist who made it had a great sense of the divine. Look at Zeus. Although he is hurling his thunderbolt at mankind, yet his face is serene. He is not angry. He is impassionate.'


On the surface level (which, in certain contexts, is important) Zeus is, of course, an idol, and Saint Porphyrios has no sympathy with idolatry. But he is able to look at this pagan statue and find that it says something about the true God. This is very different from an attitude toward art where everything needs to directly promote or correspond with someone's religion or ideology.
I never thought about that, but yes the "no fantasy" mentality might have some Iconoclasm in the mindset.  Blowing up things like those Assyrian Cherubim is one of many things those ISIS fanatics have done that has tested me.  I think by this logic we would have to blow up the works of Raphael, etc because they weren't Orthodox, nor was their art.
 

Porter ODoran

Toumarches
Joined
May 8, 2014
Messages
12,135
Reaction score
6
Points
38
Age
50
Location
Eugene, OR
Faith
Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction
GOAA
Asteriktos said:
The Bible has talking donkeys, TV talking horses, movies talking vampires, books talking dragons, so why not vidyo games?
Don't make me say, Gosh, Justin, again.
 

Porter ODoran

Toumarches
Joined
May 8, 2014
Messages
12,135
Reaction score
6
Points
38
Age
50
Location
Eugene, OR
Faith
Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction
GOAA
William T said:
Iconodule said:
Something I like to cite often, from the book Wounded by Love about Elder Porphyrios:

At one point we stood before a statue of Zeus. Zeus was on his throne and was in the act of hurling a thunderbolt at mankind. Once the guide had finished telling them what she knew, she turned to me and said: 'What do you have to say about this, Pappouli? How do you see the statue?'

'I don't know much about these things,' I said. 'But as I see it, I marvel at the work of the artist and also at the human form, such a perfect divine creation. And I see that the artist who made it had a great sense of the divine. Look at Zeus. Although he is hurling his thunderbolt at mankind, yet his face is serene. He is not angry. He is impassionate.'


On the surface level (which, in certain contexts, is important) Zeus is, of course, an idol, and Saint Porphyrios has no sympathy with idolatry. But he is able to look at this pagan statue and find that it says something about the true God. This is very different from an attitude toward art where everything needs to directly promote or correspond with someone's religion or ideology.
I never thought about that, but yes the "no fantasy" mentality might have some Iconoclasm in the mindset.  Blowing up things like those Assyrian Cherubim is one of many things those ISIS fanatics have done that has tested me.  I think by this logic we would have to blow up the works of Raphael, etc because they weren't Orthodox, nor was their art.
Because there's no ground between consuming something and destroying it? I'm thinking you've played too many videogames.
 

Iconodule

Hoplitarches
Joined
Jan 2, 2010
Messages
16,486
Reaction score
23
Points
38
Age
40
Location
PA, USA
Faith
Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction
Patriarchate of Johnstown
William T said:
Iconodule said:
Something I like to cite often, from the book Wounded by Love about Elder Porphyrios:

At one point we stood before a statue of Zeus. Zeus was on his throne and was in the act of hurling a thunderbolt at mankind. Once the guide had finished telling them what she knew, she turned to me and said: 'What do you have to say about this, Pappouli? How do you see the statue?'

'I don't know much about these things,' I said. 'But as I see it, I marvel at the work of the artist and also at the human form, such a perfect divine creation. And I see that the artist who made it had a great sense of the divine. Look at Zeus. Although he is hurling his thunderbolt at mankind, yet his face is serene. He is not angry. He is impassionate.'


On the surface level (which, in certain contexts, is important) Zeus is, of course, an idol, and Saint Porphyrios has no sympathy with idolatry. But he is able to look at this pagan statue and find that it says something about the true God. This is very different from an attitude toward art where everything needs to directly promote or correspond with someone's religion or ideology.
I never thought about that, but yes the "no fantasy" mentality might have some Iconoclasm in the mindset.  Blowing up things like those Assyrian Cherubim is one of many things those ISIS fanatics have done that has tested me.  I think by this logic we would have to blow up the works of Raphael, etc because they weren't Orthodox, nor was their art.
I remember Bishop Seraphim Sigrist posted on facebook some pictures he took while eating at a Japanese restaurant in Manhattan. One happened to include a decorative Buddha statue in an outdoor garden eating area. Some priest commented with something like, "Instead of taking pictures you should have smashed that statue to powder!" As if vandalizing garden ornaments would have been a compelling witness for Orthodoxy in America. Bishop Seraphim fittingly compared the priest's attitude to ISIS.
 

Arachne

Matriarch
Staff member
Moderator
Site Supporter
Joined
Dec 22, 2012
Messages
13,021
Reaction score
701
Points
113
Age
50
Location
Camulodunum
Faith
Cradle Greek Orthodox. Cope.
Jurisdiction
Antiochian Archdiocese, UK
William T said:
I never thought about that, but yes the "no fantasy" mentality might have some Iconoclasm in the mindset.  Blowing up things like those Assyrian Cherubim is one of many things those ISIS fanatics have done that has tested me.  I think by this logic we would have to blow up the works of Raphael, etc because they weren't Orthodox, nor was their art.
I don't have direct experience with the phenomenon, as the Orthodox in Greece are completely at peace with their pagan past, but the 'unless explicitly Orthodox, it can't possibly be wholesome, and thus it must be forbidden' mindset seems disturbingly common among the ex-Protestant convert set.
 

William T

Archon
Joined
May 22, 2015
Messages
2,545
Reaction score
2
Points
0
Age
39
Location
Chicago
Faith
Orthodox
Jurisdiction
Antioch
Porter ODoran said:
William T said:
Iconodule said:
Something I like to cite often, from the book Wounded by Love about Elder Porphyrios:

At one point we stood before a statue of Zeus. Zeus was on his throne and was in the act of hurling a thunderbolt at mankind. Once the guide had finished telling them what she knew, she turned to me and said: 'What do you have to say about this, Pappouli? How do you see the statue?'

'I don't know much about these things,' I said. 'But as I see it, I marvel at the work of the artist and also at the human form, such a perfect divine creation. And I see that the artist who made it had a great sense of the divine. Look at Zeus. Although he is hurling his thunderbolt at mankind, yet his face is serene. He is not angry. He is impassionate.'


On the surface level (which, in certain contexts, is important) Zeus is, of course, an idol, and Saint Porphyrios has no sympathy with idolatry. But he is able to look at this pagan statue and find that it says something about the true God. This is very different from an attitude toward art where everything needs to directly promote or correspond with someone's religion or ideology.
I never thought about that, but yes the "no fantasy" mentality might have some Iconoclasm in the mindset.  Blowing up things like those Assyrian Cherubim is one of many things those ISIS fanatics have done that has tested me.  I think by this logic we would have to blow up the works of Raphael, etc because they weren't Orthodox, nor was their art.
Because there's no ground between consuming something and destroying it? I'm thinking you've played too many videogames.
I havent played video games since they shut down arcades in the mall when I was a teenage degenerate.  Either way, a video game is meant to be played...anything visual, religious or not is meant to be looked at..such as pagan Assyrian Cherubium, which interestingly enough are probably more "correct" than the Christian Raphael's "Cherubs".
 

Iconodule

Hoplitarches
Joined
Jan 2, 2010
Messages
16,486
Reaction score
23
Points
38
Age
40
Location
PA, USA
Faith
Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction
Patriarchate of Johnstown
Arachne said:
William T said:
I never thought about that, but yes the "no fantasy" mentality might have some Iconoclasm in the mindset.  Blowing up things like those Assyrian Cherubim is one of many things those ISIS fanatics have done that has tested me.  I think by this logic we would have to blow up the works of Raphael, etc because they weren't Orthodox, nor was their art.
I don't have direct experience with the phenomenon, as the Orthodox in Greece are completely at peace with their pagan past, but the 'unless explicitly Orthodox, it can't possibly be wholesome, and thus it must be forbidden' mindset seems disturbingly common among the ex-Protestant convert set.
Eh, as I recall, that crazy pamphlet on Harry Potter originated from Mount Athos and was distributed in Greek monasteries.
 

biro

Protostrator
Site Supporter
Warned
Post Moderated
Joined
Aug 31, 2010
Messages
24,330
Reaction score
696
Points
113
Age
49
Website
archiveofourown.org
Faith
Episcopal
Jurisdiction
Diocese of Florida
I would say they're okay as long as you don't take them literally.

People have played chess for centuries, and that's a fantasy game in its way. :)
 

Arachne

Matriarch
Staff member
Moderator
Site Supporter
Joined
Dec 22, 2012
Messages
13,021
Reaction score
701
Points
113
Age
50
Location
Camulodunum
Faith
Cradle Greek Orthodox. Cope.
Jurisdiction
Antiochian Archdiocese, UK
Iconodule said:
Arachne said:
William T said:
I never thought about that, but yes the "no fantasy" mentality might have some Iconoclasm in the mindset.  Blowing up things like those Assyrian Cherubim is one of many things those ISIS fanatics have done that has tested me.  I think by this logic we would have to blow up the works of Raphael, etc because they weren't Orthodox, nor was their art.
I don't have direct experience with the phenomenon, as the Orthodox in Greece are completely at peace with their pagan past, but the 'unless explicitly Orthodox, it can't possibly be wholesome, and thus it must be forbidden' mindset seems disturbingly common among the ex-Protestant convert set.
Eh, as I recall, that crazy pamphlet on Harry Potter originated from Mount Athos and was distributed in Greek monasteries.
Our own pagan past is fine and dandy, but a line is drawn at kaina daimonia from the West. ;)
 

William T

Archon
Joined
May 22, 2015
Messages
2,545
Reaction score
2
Points
0
Age
39
Location
Chicago
Faith
Orthodox
Jurisdiction
Antioch
Arachne said:
William T said:
I never thought about that, but yes the "no fantasy" mentality might have some Iconoclasm in the mindset.  Blowing up things like those Assyrian Cherubim is one of many things those ISIS fanatics have done that has tested me.  I think by this logic we would have to blow up the works of Raphael, etc because they weren't Orthodox, nor was their art.
I don't have direct experience with the phenomenon, as the Orthodox in Greece are completely at peace with their pagan past, but the 'unless explicitly Orthodox, it can't possibly be wholesome, and thus it must be forbidden' mindset seems disturbingly common among the ex-Protestant convert set.
As a boy I unwittingly and naively took it as a compliment when evangelicals said Orthodoxy (and the homes of much of my family and friends) was "semi-pagan".  I was raised by almost as many pagan myths as I was Bible stories.
 

William T

Archon
Joined
May 22, 2015
Messages
2,545
Reaction score
2
Points
0
Age
39
Location
Chicago
Faith
Orthodox
Jurisdiction
Antioch
Iconodule said:
Arachne said:
William T said:
I never thought about that, but yes the "no fantasy" mentality might have some Iconoclasm in the mindset.  Blowing up things like those Assyrian Cherubim is one of many things those ISIS fanatics have done that has tested me.  I think by this logic we would have to blow up the works of Raphael, etc because they weren't Orthodox, nor was their art.
I don't have direct experience with the phenomenon, as the Orthodox in Greece are completely at peace with their pagan past, but the 'unless explicitly Orthodox, it can't possibly be wholesome, and thus it must be forbidden' mindset seems disturbingly common among the ex-Protestant convert set.
Eh, as I recall, that crazy pamphlet on Harry Potter originated from Mount Athos and was distributed in Greek monasteries.
Maybe it's best stated as a general rule.  I doubt any religion, political thought, cultural philosophy, or whatever that has broad appeal and applications is going to be immune to these kind of thoughts.  It's probably not appropriate to harp on this too much, but the natural sectarian nature of much of Protestantism has probably less guards and checks on it than Orthodoxy. 

lol, One obvious strike against it is that Luther opened a Pandora's box (pagan reference!) when he let all those monks out of the monastery and into the world.
 

ironchapman

High Elder
Joined
Oct 22, 2011
Messages
829
Reaction score
2
Points
18
Location
North Dakota
Faith
Serious inquirer.
I freely admit that this might qualify as overthinking things (which I am VERY good at), but there has been something that's been on my mind about a number of fantasy video games and regular games.

I'm well aware that using magic in video games and the like and such isn't the same as attempting real magic, pagan rites, etc. Summoning a fire spell to burn your enemies, for example, isn't anything close to any spells people attempt in real life. That much doesn't bother me. However, I do sometimes wonder about the utilization of things like "cursed," "demon," or "evil" weapons, items, or similar things (lots of games, for example, have a cursed sword of some sort). There's one game series I play where you can use an item that causes "evil spirits" to lurk around you to make it easier to fight enemies. Even if it isn't real, you're still making use of something supposedly designed for evil. I recognize that this might extend into a ridiculous level of abstraction, but it's still something that has sat on my mind for a while.
 

TheTrisagion

Hoplitarches
Joined
Nov 9, 2012
Messages
18,010
Reaction score
358
Points
83
Age
42
Location
PA, USA
Faith
Orthodox
Jurisdiction
Antiochian
I don't see anything wrong with them unless you are spending too much of your time ogling the succubus' boobs.
 

William T

Archon
Joined
May 22, 2015
Messages
2,545
Reaction score
2
Points
0
Age
39
Location
Chicago
Faith
Orthodox
Jurisdiction
Antioch
TheTrisagion said:
I don't see anything wrong with them unless you are spending too much of your time ogling the succubus' boobs.
please define with absolute precision: "ogling", "the", "succubus", and "boobs".  please define the last word as long and slow as possible please.
 
Top