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Best Books on the Assyrian Church of the East

bwallace23350

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I know very little about them and would like to read up on them. What is everyones opinion on them?
 

David Young

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Dalrymple's book (mentioned above) has perhaps a misleading title. It is called from the Holy Mountain because he makes a journey eastwards, starting from Mt Athos. It is not primarily about Mt Athos.
 

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Christoph Baumer, The Church of the East: An Illustrated History of Assyrian Christianity is probably the most accessible starting-point. If you have access to a library that has it or interlibrary loan, also very good is Wilhelm Baum and Ditmar Winkler, The Church of the East: A Concise History.
 

bwallace23350

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How does the Orthodox view the Assyrian Church of the East?
 

Samn!

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How does the Orthodox view the Assyrian Church of the East?

There's not too much interaction between the two churches in the Middle East, since the latter only have a large presence in Iraq. A handful of Assyrian parishes in Baghdad became Orthodox in the 1940s, but since then relations appear to be cordial, if distant. In the wider Middle East the Church of the East is blocked from membership in the Middle Eastern Council of Churches by the Copts, who take a very aggressive line against them.

In the past 5 or so years, there has been greatly increased contact between the Moscow Patriarchate and the Church of the East (which has a largish population in Russia) including an official theological dialogue that, from the one participant in it that I spoke to, is apparently going well. Mar Awa Royel, the Assyrian bishop of California, seems to be especially interested in rapprochement with Orthodoxy and has reintroduced some Orthodox practices that had disappeared in the Church of the East over the past 500 or so years, including icon veneration and, amazingly, monasticism.
 

Dominika

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There's not too much interaction between the two churches in the Middle East, since the latter only have a large presence in Iraq. A handful of Assyrian parishes in Baghdad became Orthodox in the 1940s, but since then relations appear to be cordial, if distant. In the wider Middle East the Church of the East is blocked from membership in the Middle Eastern Council of Churches by the Copts, who take a very aggressive line against them.

In the past 5 or so years, there has been greatly increased contact between the Moscow Patriarchate and the Church of the East (which has a largish population in Russia) including an official theological dialogue that, from the one participant in it that I spoke to, is apparently going well. Mar Awa Royel, the Assyrian bishop of California, seems to be especially interested in rapprochement with Orthodoxy and has reintroduced some Orthodox practices that had disappeared in the Church of the East over the past 500 or so years, including icon veneration and, amazingly, monasticism.
I know about those Assyrians converted to Orthodoxy as I have friends among them. But I'm very surprised that have been not monasticiism amogn Assyrians for such long time, quite paradox things. Do you have any more info or sources about this?
 

Samn!

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I know about those Assyrians converted to Orthodoxy as I have friends among them. But I'm very surprised that have been not monasticiism amogn Assyrians for such long time, quite paradox things. Do you have any more info or sources about this?
Basically, two things happened- after the Mongols, the Church of the East was largely limited to the mountains of Kurdistan and its people re-tribalized (for lack of a better word) in terms of adopting Kurdish social patterns, which were not favorable to monasticism, and the office of patriarch even became hereditary uncle-to-nephew. Then also, in the 16th century, what was left of the church's monasticism (in particular, the Monastery of Mar Hormizd in Alqosh) went over to the Unia. Baum and Winkler may discuss this some-- I don't recall exactly.
 

Dominika

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Basically, two things happened- after the Mongols, the Church of the East was largely limited to the mountains of Kurdistan and its people re-tribalized (for lack of a better word) in terms of adopting Kurdish social patterns, which were not favorable to monasticism, and the office of patriarch even became hereditary uncle-to-nephew. Then also, in the 16th century, what was left of the church's monasticism (in particular, the Monastery of Mar Hormizd in Alqosh) went over to the Unia. Baum and Winkler may discuss this some-- I don't recall exactly.
Yeah, I knew about the patriarch office beind hereditary, and also I was assiocaiting Assyrians in last centuries with the Kurdinstan mountains, but frankly, I thought they were perfect place for monastic life. I didn't think about the social patterns.
Thank you, in spare time I'll look more into it.
 

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Here are some worthwhile introductory videos on the Assyrian Churches theology:


 
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