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By God's Grace In Arabic

Bizzlebin

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I'm looking for the equivalent idiomatic phrase in Arabic for "by God's grace" or "by the grace of God" (Latin: Dei gratia); I think "billah" is close, but I want the idiom that specifically mentions grace. Please provide the Arabic as well as the English transliteration. Thanks!
 

Dominika

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I'm not sure if I undestand correctly, that's what comes to my mind:

Thanks God: Nashkour Allah نشكر الله
Praise God: Al7amdu Allah الحمد الله

If God's Willing: In sza2 Allah ان شاء الله
If God wants: Iza Allah rad اذا الله اراد

Of course it's not exact pronunciation.
 

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I'm not sure if I undestand correctly, that's what comes to my mind:

Thanks God: Nashkour Allah نشكر الله
Praise God: Al7amdu Allah الحمد الله

If God's Willing: In sza2 Allah ان شاء الله
If God wants: Iza Allah rad اذا الله اراد

Of course it's not exact pronunciation.
The first phrases are common, but don't mention grace. The second are more a translation of "God willing" (Latin: Deo volente), and one I'm trying to avoid: based on my conversations with a Muslim friend, she also seems to think there is some connection there to an "evil eye", superstitions, etc and so it is as much of a cuss word and/or profanity (AIUI) as a genuinely faithful exclamation. What I'm after may not be as common—I don't know—but I'm still looking for a clear way to mention that something is not just by God's "general plan" (inasmuch as some people think that way), but directly by His *grace*.
 

Dominika

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The first phrases are common, but don't mention grace. The second are more a translation of "God willing" (Latin: Deo volente), and one I'm trying to avoid: based on my conversations with a Muslim friend, she also seems to think there is some connection there to an "evil eye", superstitions, etc and so it is as much of a cuss word and/or profanity (AIUI) as a genuinely faithful exclamation. What I'm after may not be as common—I don't know—but I'm still looking for a clear way to mention that something is not just by God's "general plan" (inasmuch as some people think that way), but directly by His *grace*.
So the two quotations. The translation cannot be always (actually, plenty of times), literal. You can say bi-ni3mat Allah that literally means "By God's grace" but it sounds strange, it is not used except maybe some theological essays in given context.

BTW, the expressions I've shared are used also by Arab Christians, including Orthodox. I also use them when speaking Arabic (so, every day).
 

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Maltese, being a Semitic language, has some similarities with this.

"If God wants: Iza Allah rad اذا الله اراد " in Maltese would be "Jekk Alla jrid".

We have "by the Grace of God" - "Għall-grazzja t'Alla", but "grazzja" is Romance not Semitic.
 

Dominika

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Maltese, being a Semitic language, has some similarities with this.

"If God wants: Iza Allah rad اذا الله اراد " in Maltese would be "Jekk Alla jrid".

We have "by the Grace of God" - "Għall-grazzja t'Alla", but "grazzja" is Romance not Semitic.
Some even would say that Maltese is an Arabic dialect (a type of Levantine?...) with strong Italian influence ;) sometimes I watch a bit of Maltese Catholic Church to check how much I understand and what kind of vocabulary is used ;)
 
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I'm not sure if I undestand correctly, that's what comes to my mind:

Thanks God: Nashkour Allah نشكر الله
Praise God: Al7amdu Allah الحمد الله

If God's Willing: In sza2 Allah ان شاء الله
If God wants: Iza Allah rad اذا الله اراد

Of course it's not exact pronunciation.
How do you pronounce numbers?
 

Dominika

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How do you pronounce numbers?
Well they are used in Arabic Intertnet and text messages "slang", In scientific transctipion (generally as they are various), 2 is ʾ (hamza), 3 is ʿ (ein), 7 is ḥ.
And I see of course it should be in sha2 Allah, I've written it in Polish way 😁
 

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Some even would say that Maltese is an Arabic dialect (a type of Levantine?...) with strong Italian influence ;) sometimes I watch a bit of Maltese Catholic Church to check how much I understand and what kind of vocabulary is used ;)
It resembles the Arabic spoken by the Tunisians and Lebanese. But it had influence from Andalusian Arabic and then drifted, so to speak, away from Semitic languages. Very few words are actually from Punic too. As far as I know it's the only Semitic language written in Latin letters.
 

Dominika

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It resembles the Arabic spoken by the Tunisians and Lebanese. But it had influence from Andalusian Arabic and then drifted, so to speak, away from Semitic languages. Very few words are actually from Punic too. As far as I know it's the only Semitic language written in Latin letters.
Yes, type of Levantine as I said, and since I use Lebanese dialect daily, so yes.. that's it ;)
 

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It resembles the Arabic spoken by the Tunisians and Lebanese.
To be a dork, the Arabic layer in Maltese is what's called "Pre-Hilalian" Western Arabic. That is, prior to the 11th century, Arabic in North Africa (and so also in Sicily and Malta) was a primarily urban phenomenon, sharing some phonological features with non-Bedouin Eastern Arabic (e.g., qaf articulated as a glottal stop). Then the Bani Hilal swept through, Arabizing the hinterland with a Bedouin dialect, so now pre-Hilalian features on the mainland of Africa are only found in some urban sociolects (for example, the speech of old families in Fès, Morocco stands out because of how sharp the contrast is to adjacent dialects). But you can tell that Maltese is Western Arabic from telltale morphological features like ni- as the first person performative prefix in both the singular and plural of the imperfect and the lack of a distinction between masculine and feminine 2nd person perfective verbs.
 
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Samn!

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That said, the fact that ecclesiastical terminology in Maltese is largely borrowed from Levantine Christian Arabic-- a striking one is 'qassis' for priest, ultimately a very early Syriac borrowing into Arabic (you can tell this because the root q-sh means "to be old" in Syriac, but no such root q-s-s exists in Arabic with a similar sense)-- probably indicates some connections between Arabic-speaking Sicilian Christians and the Levant that we don't have much evidence for in literary sources. We know, for example, that there were Orthodox Christians on Sicily who were theoretically under Constantinople during the period of Arab rule, but we have no clue how their ecclesiastical life was organized.
 
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