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Deuterocanonical books listed by chronological theme

rakovsky

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Apostolic Canon 85 that Trullo Canon 2 accepts - alone among the sources in Canon 2 - affirms not only 2-3 Macc, putting them in the Deuterocanon, but seemingly also 1 to 2 Clement , which the Church seems to unanimously currently consider noncanonical.

Apostolic Canon 85 says,
Our own books, that is, those of the New Testament, are: the four Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John; fourteen Epistles of Paul; two Epistles of Peter; three of John; one of James, and one of Jude. Two Epistles of Clemens, and the Constitutions of me Clemens, addressed to you Bishops, in eight books, which are not to be published to all on account of the mystical things in them. And the Acts of us the Apostles.
This sounds a little confusing because it seems to list them with the NT Canon, but the translator puts a period before the mention of Clement and the Constitutions, which seems reasonable because the prior sentence ends with "and one of Jude.", as if Jude is the end of the list of the NT Canon.

Also, Trullo Canon 2 specifies that the above mentioned Apostolic Constitutions are not in the NT Canon.
 

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In her Tales From Exile series on Judith 5.1-5.3, Kristin the presenter theorizes that Judith's story is a parable, rather than a factual historical narrative.

I find her theory persuasive. Judith as a name is the female form of Judah, and Bethulyah/Bethulia, her city, means virginity. WIkipedia's article on Bethulia notes:
Greek: Βαιτυλούᾳ, Baituloua; Hebrew: בתוליה)
...
The name "Bethuliah" in Hebrew can be associated, in an allegorical sense, with "Beth-el" (house of God).[2] If treated as a real geographical name, it can be explained as a composite word built from "betulah", virgin, and "Jah", the proper name of God, so literally "Yhwh's virgin".
The story declares that the Nebuchadnezzar of the account is the king of Assyria, and that the Jews have returned from Exile and rebuilt their Temple, and then reconsecrated it. In real history, Nebuchadnezzar was the king of Babylon in the 6th century BC, and the Jews returned from exile and rebuilt their Temple after the Persians defeated the Babylonian Empire. A "reconsecration" of their Temple occurred in the time of the Maccabees in the 2nd century BC.

Kristin notes that a Jewish writer in the 6th-1st centuries BC would certainly have known that these details were not historically correct, and she reasonably concludes that therefore the author was intending to write a fictional parable. She compared it to a story in which "Lady Liberty" would be depicted by the feminine "We can do it! poster" and would have defended the United States in WWII.
 

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In "Catholic Introduction to the Old Testament: Judith", Fr. Larry Young makes three interesting points. One is that Judith stayed 3 days at the Assyrian invaders' camp when she went there to deceive and kill their leader, Holofernes. Judith 12 has:
7. So Holofernes ordered his guards not to hinder her. Thus she stayed in the camp three days. Each night she went out to the valley of Bethulia, where she bathed herself* at the spring of the camp.c
8. After bathing, she prayed to the Lord, the God of Israel, to direct her way for the triumph of her people.
9. Then she returned purified to the tent and remained there until her food was brought to her toward evening.d

He notes that the three day theme comes up repeatedly in the Bible.

Second, Fr. Larry notes that Jerome's Vulgate Latin version of the Bible has verses that are not in the Greek version, about how her beauty was enhanced greatly by her virtue. This brings up an interesting question of whether Jerome was using a Hebrew/Aramaic original version of Judith that had these extra verses.

To explain better what I mean, sometimes there are noticeable differences between the Masoretic and LXX, even putting aside particularly Christological passages. One that comes to mind is Zechariah 12:11. The KJV, using the Vulgate and the Masoretic, has: " In that day shall there be a great mourning in Jerusalem, as the mourning of Hadadrimmon in the valley of Megiddon." Instead, the LXX for that verse talks about the pomegranate tree being cut down in the plain. ( Rimmon in Hebrew means pomegranate. )

St Jerome was working with a Hebrew version of the Old Testament and translating it into Latin. One explanation about the difference in Judith between the Vulgate and the LXX could be that Jerome was working with a Hebrew text version of Judith. In Qumran among the Dead Sea Scrolls, some Hebrew and Aramaic scrolls like Tobit (but not Judith) were found for Deuterocanonical books, so apparently the original versions of some of them were made in Semitic.

Third, in the last part (around 55 min. into the video lecture), Fr. Larry refers to the ending section of Judith that talks about people rejoicing with musical instruments. Judith 15-16 has Judith's celebration and her song of deliverance:
and she and the other women crowned themselves with olive leaves. Then, at the head of all the people, she led the women in the dance, while the men of Israel followed, bearing their weapons, wearing garlands and singing songs of praise.
Judith led all Israel in this song of thanksgiving, and the people loudly sang this hymn of praise:

And Judith sang:
“Strike up a song to my God with tambourines,
sing to the Lord with cymbals;
Improvise for him a new song,
exalt and acclaim his name...."
He concludes from this that Charismatic Catholic modes of music can be acceptable when they play on some instruments, but that he doesn't agree with extreme cases of Charismatic services.
He says:
So anybody that says "Oh, there is no place for tambourines, or drums or anything other than an organ in a church and we can't use anything other than an organ in a church, and we can only sing Gregorian chant,"
I get that, I understand that, it is part of our liturgical patrimony, I love all that stuff. But they just disparage stringed instruments and say "This has no part in our liturgy and this is degrading the mass and blah blah blah."
I'm like 'Read the Old Testament, man, they were banging on lyres and harps and stuff and clashing cymbals and banging on tamborines and things and dancing around and their arms up in the air. Sounds like charismatic style worship to me.
One difference between the celebration in Judith and liturgical Charismatic worship is that the dancing musical celebration in Judith was part of celebrating a national victory, rather than a ritual liturgical service, like in a Temple or synagogue. If we were to relate this to the Christian era, this would be like a victory parade with dancers and music in Emperor Constantine's time, rather than performing a Latin mass in 4th century Rome with dancing.

To make the case for Charismatic style worship, you would really want to look for examples of instruments and dancing, etc. being used as part of a formal OT synagogue or Temple service. Paul in his correspondence to the Corinthians talks about them speaking in tongues at their gatherings, but it's not clear that they were doing this as part of a formal service, as opposed to at non-liturgical gatherings.
 

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Here are readings of the Book of Judith:
  • The Book of Judith (KJV) read by Christopher Glyn
  • The Book Of Judith - King James Version (KJV), uploaded by Classic Catholic Audiobooks
  • The Book of Judith (Apocrypha), KJV, uplaoded by Sons of Jacob Ministries
  • The Book Of Judith - Douay–Rheims Bible, recorded by Sam Stinson
  • The Book of Judith 📚 The Bible 🕎, narrated by Sean McKinley
  • The Book of Judith, RSVCE (Audio with Caption)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TTjqmmAnkos&ab_channel=CatholicFaith
 

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These are documentaries and talks on Italian artist Artemisia Gentileschi, who painted scenes of Judith and Holofernes:
  • Artemisia Undaunted
  • Judith Slaying Holofernes, Artemisia Gentileschi: Great Art Explained
    youtube.com/watch?v=LejFaCncuc4&ab_channel=GreatArtExplained
  • Judith and Holofernes: Two Baroque Masterpieces (This talk also discusses Caravaggio's artwork on the subject)
  • ARTEMISIA GENTILESCHI'S JUDITH BEHEADING HOLOFERNES: Painterly Revenge?
  • "Judith Slaying Holofernes", uploaded by The Canvas compares Artemisia's and Caravaggio's paintings on the subject.
"Cranach the Elder, Judith with the Head of Holofernes". This is a talk about a c.1530 painting by Lucas Cranach the Elder on the same theme:

"Story behind… Judith & Holofernes" by Slava S. links to several videos and lectures on Gustav Klimt's paint of Judith and Holofernes' head, including a 3D rendition version of his painting:
 

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Here are Bible Studies on Judith that I heard:
 

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I also saw lectures connecting Judith's story to the Hanukkah story. For instance, Judith is the female form of the name Judah, Judah Maccabee being one of the leaders of the Jewish revolt.
  • The Story of Judith: A Hanukkah Heroine
  • Hanukkah and Judith
  • Judith and the Hanukkah Story
  • Judith: The Forgotten Hanukkah Heroine
  • Judith: Hanukkah Heroine | History, by the History Channel
 

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"The Book of Judith" is a 2009 Canadian drama play that partly uses the Biblical story of Judith:
"The Book of Judith" is also a US-Mexican movie by Alex Giner:
"Judith"/"Judita" is a Croatian musical play by Ensemble Dialogos and Katarina Livljanic:
  • Here are excerpts from the 2010 DVD recording of the play:
  • Apparently, this is a song from the play with musical accompaniment:
"Judith of Bethulia" is a 1913-1914 silent movie:
  • Here is the movie in full, for 1 hour 12 minutes:
  • Here is the movie with musical accompaniment, for almost 47 minutes:
 
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