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EC vs. OC

J Michael

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You could always consider the Eastern Catholic Church. But then....it's still "Catholic" and under the authority of Rome, though many EC's pretty much just ignore Rome and the Pope.

To your original question, though--If you leave the Catholic Church for the OC, you are, as far as the Catholics are concerned, committing the sin of schism. But you will be welcomed by the Orthodox by entering the true Church. If you leave the Orthodox Church for the Catholic Church, yo will be committing the sin of schism, as far as the OC is concerned. But you will be welcomed by the Catholics by entering the true Church. Either way, according to each Church, you will have to "give an account to God". Interesting.....(I'll say no more, as I'll just get myself into trouble :) .)
 

PorphyriosK

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You could always consider the Eastern Catholic Church. But then....it's still "Catholic" and under the authority of Rome, though many EC's pretty much just ignore Rome and the Pope.

To your original question, though--If you leave the Catholic Church for the OC, you are, as far as the Catholics are concerned, committing the sin of schism. But you will be welcomed by the Orthodox by entering the true Church. If you leave the Orthodox Church for the Catholic Church, yo will be committing the sin of schism, as far as the OC is concerned. But you will be welcomed by the Catholics by entering the true Church. Either way, according to each Church, you will have to "give an account to God". Interesting.....(I'll say no more, as I'll just get myself into trouble :) .)
And yet strangely Rome now allows Orthodox to commune if they wish to without conversion. (Not that Orthodox are allowed or would wish to do so). I don't know what theological reasons they have claimed for allowing this
 

hecma925

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And yet strangely Rome now allows Orthodox to commune if they wish to without conversion. (Not that Orthodox are allowed or would wish to do so). I don't know what theological reasons they have claimed for allowing this
Something about lungs or some such nonsense.
 

J Michael

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And yet strangely Rome now allows Orthodox to commune if they wish to without conversion. (Not that Orthodox are allowed or would wish to do so). I don't know what theological reasons they have claimed for allowing this
I'm sure there might be situations in which an Orthodox Christian might want to receive Holy Communion in a Catholic church, but I'd guess it would be pretty rare and unusual. I have heard from family in PA., though, that it does occur that Eastern Catholics and Orthodox commune at each other's churches. But don't tell anybody....
What then about non-Catholics? Sadly, since the time our Lord founded the Church upon the apostles, we have witnessed divisions, the first major one being with the Orthodox churches in 1054 and then followed by the Protestant churches beginning in 1517. While all Christians share many beliefs — for instance in Jesus Christ, in Baptism, and in the Bible as the Word of God — and can work and pray together in serving the mission of our Lord, major differences in beliefs still do exist, including the primacy of the Pope, the sacrificial priesthood, and the nature of sacraments, including what the Holy Eucharist is. Indeed, much progress has been made since the Second Vatican Council to discuss these differences with various Christian groups. Nevertheless, these differences still "break the common participation in the table of the Lord" (Catechism, No. 1398). Here we find some distinction. Concerning the Orthodox churches, who primarily disagree with Catholics over the authority of the Pope, Vatican II's "Decree on Ecumenism" ("Unitatis Redintegratio," 1964) stated, "These Churches, although separated from us, yet possess true sacraments, above all — by apostolic succession — the priesthood and the Eucharist, whereby they are still joined to us in closest intimacy." A certain communion in sacris including the Holy Eucharist, "given suitable circumstances and the approval of Church authority, is not merely possible but is encouraged" (No. 15). Along these lines, the Code of Canon Law stipulates that the Sacraments of Penance, Eucharist, and Anointing of the Sick may be administered to members of the Orthodox churches if they ask on their own for these sacraments and are properly disposed (Canon 844, No. 3).
https://www.catholiceducation.org/en/culture/catholic-contributions/who-can-receive-communion.html
 

LizaSymonenko

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I'm sure there might be situations in which an Orthodox Christian might want to receive Holy Communion in a Catholic church, but I'd guess it would be pretty rare and unusual. I have heard from family in PA., though, that it does occur that Eastern Catholics and Orthodox commune at each other's churches. But don't tell anybody....
https://www.catholiceducation.org/en/culture/catholic-contributions/who-can-receive-communion.html
This is soooo true. Because the two "look" similar - church structure is similar, ikonostas, clergy vestments, etc... most people do not realize they are not the same Church.

...and often the parishes are located near one another. I know people who willfully jump back and forth. At the ByzCath for their event, back at the EO for their event... confessing and communing at both.

They simply do not realize they are not the same... or maybe just do not care.

We have much mission work to be done in our own parishes. No need to travel halfway across the world.
 

J Michael

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This is soooo true. Because the two "look" similar - church structure is similar, ikonostas, clergy vestments, etc... most people do not realize they are not the same Church.

...and often the parishes are located near one another. I know people who willfully jump back and forth. At the ByzCath for their event, back at the EO for their event... confessing and communing at both.

They simply do not realize they are not the same... or maybe just do not care.

We have much mission work to be done in our own parishes. No need to travel halfway across the world.
I'm gonna go out on a limb and suggest that it's the latter--they just do not care. Not only are the items you mentioned above similar to the point of being the same; in many, many instances the Divine Liturgy is the same, except in the EC version the references to the Pope, etc. The theology and ecclesiology, as far as I'm aware, are virtually identical. But again, there's that little thing about that Pope guy and his "supremacy". Or, is it "primacy"? :). And yes, I do know that there are other "issues" as well.

I remember reading a few years ago, I think on the Melkite Catholic website, a letter or article from one of the bishops bemoaning the lack of formal communion between the Orthodox and Eastern Catholics. He referred to the things I wrote in the above paragraph, amongst other things, saying, in essence, that we are virtually the same but for a few differences that CAN be overcome given goodwill and willingness. Or something like that. If I find the letter or article again, I'll post it somewhere.
 

LizaSymonenko

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The theology and ecclesiology, as far as I'm aware, are virtually identical.
The Ukrainian Greek Catholics were once Orthodox, therefore, the similarity. They were forced to convert, and yet were permitted to retain the outward appearance they were familiar with. Today, they are free to return to their mother Orthodox Church, but, the vast populace are uneducated and unaware of the major differences, and stay where they are for ease, and comfort. Change is hard.

But again, there's that little thing about that Pope guy and his "supremacy". Or, is it "primacy"? :). And yes, I do know that there are other "issues" as well.
Sadly, it goes deeper than the "Pope guy". The Greek Catholics/ByzCatholics accept the Pope and therefore, all RC Doctrine.
 

J Michael

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If it's "virtually the same", what stops EC from becoming Orthodox?
Lots of things. Not everyone has the same reason(s). Liza provided some of the answer in her post above, though I'm pretty sure she's referring to Ukrainian Catholics in Ukraine, not in Canada or the U.S.
 

LizaSymonenko

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Lots of things. Not everyone has the same reason(s). Liza provided some of the answer in her post above, though I'm pretty sure she's referring to Ukrainian Catholics in Ukraine, not in Canada or the U.S.
I am referring to them all... Why would it be any different in the U.S. than in Ukraine?

I know many people (in the U.S.) who regularly attend parishes of both Churches... partake of the Sacraments at both... not because they are callous, but, because they do not realize there is a difference. It's a matter of convenience, or where their friends are going that Sunday, or they prefer their school, or there's a cool program going on, etc.
 
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