• For users new and old: the forum rules were streamlined when we transitioned to the new software. Please ensure that you are familiar with them. Continued use of the forum means that you (a) know the rules, and (b) pledge that you'll abide by them. For more information, check out the OrthodoxChristianity.Net Rules section. (There are only 2 threads there - Rules, and Administrative Structure.)

Episcopal church's 'U2 Eucharist' a growing trend

TomS

Archon
Joined
Apr 6, 2003
Messages
3,186
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
63
Location
Maryland
In the name of the Father, the Son, and Bono
'U2 Eucharist' a growing trend

PROVIDENCE, Rhode Island (AP) -- As the electric guitar in the U2 anthem "Pride (In the Name of Love)" faded from four speakers, the Rev. Robert Brooks welcomed worshippers to Grace Episcopal Church with an unusual suggestion: He warned them to protect their hearing.

"If the sound's an issue, we do have earplugs available," he said.

Ushers handed out earplugs and fluorescent glow sticks for the "U2 Eucharist," a communion service punctuated by the Irish rock band's music. Episcopal parishes from California to Maine have hosted similar events, weaving U2's tunes -- laced with biblical references -- into the liturgy.

Streamers flew over worshippers' heads at the recent gathering in Providence. Children danced by the altar. Plasma-screen TVs illuminated the gothic sanctuary. Some people sang and clapped, while a few looked puzzled.

Brooks said the evening was designed to invigorate his once-aging congregation -- attracting young people and those interested in social activism. "We absolutely need to grow in order to survive," he said.

Weeks before the service, church members conducted what Brooks called "guerrilla marketing," posting fliers at coffee and sandwich shops, bars and colleges. About 130 people showed up for the Friday night service, roughly the same turnout as a Sunday morning. The event included an offering for local charities and enlisted volunteers for the One Campaign, an effort to alleviate global poverty backed by U2's lead singer, Bono.

A similar U2 Eucharist in November proved popular at All Saints' Church in Atlanta. Organizer Laurie Haynes Burlington said she and her husband planned on 300 worshippers. About 500 showed up.

No one tracks how many parishes have hosted similar events, but the service in Providence was based on a playlist created by the Rev. Paige Blair, a parish priest in York Harbor, Maine.

'Liturgical resonances'
Her format has spread by word-of-mouth and on clergy e-mail lists. She's received calls from more than a dozen interested churches and helped put on the service in Providence. (Episcopal parishes seem to be the only ones that have latched on to U2 in such an organized way.)

Christian Scharen, 39, a Lutheran pastor and professor at Yale Divinity School, said he's often argued to older colleagues that U2 is heavily influenced by Christianity. He wrote a book on the subject, "One Step Closer: Why U2 Matters to Those Seeking God," and says it doesn't surprise him that some congregations have caught on.

"People who have these liturgical resonances in their bones, they go to a U2 concert and they just get it," Scharen said.

Bono, meanwhile, has told interviewers that he worships God through music. He once belonged to an ascetic Christian community, and in February, he spoke at the National Prayer Breakfast. The band's early tapes were sold in religious bookstores.

Still, the band members are traditional rock 'n' rollers -- they swear, drink and sing about sex. It's also not known whether U2 endorses the services using their songs: Blair said she received permission from U2's publishing company to use the group's music, but never talked to the band. Representatives for U2 did not return phone calls seeking comment.

In Providence, Blair delivered a homily to pitch the One Campaign, which the Episcopal Church supports. She ticked off statistics about poverty and infant mortality in Africa, underscoring her points with equal parts Bono and Bible.

"If you're a Bono fan, you know the next line: Where you live should not determine whether you live or die," she said, then reminding worshippers of a Gospel passage warning that taking care of the needy is what will separate the good from the bad at the final judgment.

The opening hymn was "Pride (In the Name of Love)," an early hit. As the music played, pictures of famous believers including Harriet Tubman, Rosa Parks and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. flashed on a 10-by-14 foot screen set up behind the church's altar.

Several songs included in the service sound more like angry lamentations than hymns of praise. "Peace on Earth," inspired by a deadly bombing in Northern Ireland, questions why God won't halt human suffering.

"Jesus can you take the time to throw a drowning man a line," Bono sings.

Some Christians might not be able to relate to the shades of doubt and anger, but Blair said that struggle is evident in the Bible.

For example, Bono echoes the 40th Psalm in the opening lines of the band's song "40," belting out, "I waited patiently for the Lord. He inclined and heard my cry."

Copyright 2006 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Find this article at:
http://www.cnn.com/2006/SHOWBIZ/Music/04/14/u2.eucharist.ap/index.html

 

Amdetsion

High Elder
Joined
Nov 22, 2004
Messages
931
Reaction score
0
Points
0
WOW!!!

And I thought the John Coltrane Church which started in LA was shocking with the JAZZ liturgy and praise worship services.

Even yet there is a church group in LA which pays people to come to church services....YES PAYS people. The people who are being hired to serve god in their church must first and foremost be White. White attendance at this once majority black parish has doubled. Maybe they will get smart and start paying Muslims to worship Christ with them.

It seems we are entering a period where secularism serves as the main attraction; the focus even to bring people to God. The message of Jesus Christ does not seem to be good enough for some of these so-called "Christian" ministers. Like the Guy said in the article ' he needed to do something to attract people'.

We must pray for this.

Thanks

 

Elisha

Protokentarchos
Joined
Feb 21, 2003
Messages
4,908
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
45
Location
NorCal
Amdetsion said:
WOW!!!

And I thought the John Coltrane Church which started in LA was shocking with the JAZZ liturgy and praise worship services.
I thought it started in San Fran? A friend of mine from church went to a John Coltrane service in SF one time several years ago. He said is was very interesting.

Amdetsion, btw, where do you live and what church do you attend? It would help to know where you're coming from in order to discuss things better. Thanks.
 

Keble

Protokentarchos
Joined
Mar 31, 2003
Messages
3,623
Reaction score
1
Points
0
Age
61
Location
Maryland
Considering how the AP was suckered by the "Gospel of Judas" hype, I pretty much ignore any religion trend story they put out. They are just clueless.
 

Amdetsion

High Elder
Joined
Nov 22, 2004
Messages
931
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Elisha

I am an Orthodox Christian baptised in the One Holy Universal and Apostolic Church of Ethiopia.

I am not being sarcastic. I try to refer to the faith and Christ' Church in a way that is not nationalistic.; avoiding usages like 'Ethiopian Church', 'Greek Church', Coptic Church etc. The CHURCH is not Greek or Ethiopian etc. but is UNIVERSAL and APOSTOLIC, ORTHODOX IN THE LORD.

I believe over time this has caused such a carving up of the Holy Orthodox Church creating property lines if you will. It has caused the 'us' and the 'them' and the "we do this' and 'They do that'. We barely see each other as being of the same faith sometimes.

I was saddened to find that their is an Orthodox seminary near me. WHY? Because it is called an 'Armenian' seminary. Compare protestant or RC seminaries such as 'Union Theological'...no mention of Rome or Romans. This is just one example of course. The Church serves all who need and thirst for righteousness; we are obligated to make this clear to people first and foremost and that "first" is how WE see ourselves.

Seems that we (Orthodox) tend to want to own things that are the property of the Holy Spirit just because it has been such a part of our lives and thus national heritage.

Anyway .... that is my situation

Thanks for Asking.

 

Elisha

Protokentarchos
Joined
Feb 21, 2003
Messages
4,908
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
45
Location
NorCal
Amdetsion,
Thanks. Are you in the USA right now or posting from Ethiopia? Just curious. You could ad this info in your profile so that we know. Since it is a different language, I have no idea what 'Sebhat le Timketew' means. Btw, there are many Eritreans at my OCA parish. Over 100 will show up at Pascha and there are usually 20-50 on the average Sunday. On a local level, I know Ethiopians and Eritreans can be adversaries because of their civil war history, but what about in America? They recognize that one comes from this or that country? Do they get along in public (like around town) or try to avoid each other? There are a few Ethiopians at my workplace as well and one who works at the local supermarket (Safeway). Just curious. Thanks.
 
Joined
Aug 8, 2004
Messages
2,743
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Elisha said:
 Btw, there are many Eritreans at my OCA parish.  Over 100 will show up at Pascha and there are usually 20-50 on the average Sunday.
They don't have any OO parishes nearby?
 

Nacho

OC.Net Guru
Joined
Jan 10, 2004
Messages
1,482
Reaction score
0
Points
36
Location
Sacramento
Anyone know where I could catch a "Depeche Mode" Eucharist...... ::)
 

Amdetsion

High Elder
Joined
Nov 22, 2004
Messages
931
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Elisha

I am posting in the United States; NYC.
I forgot to answer that part of your query before ...sorry.

Eritrean and Ethiopian people are one and the same. Our differences are ideological - sociopolitical.

Compare the huge senseless loss of life and property caused by the American civil war. Most people are not aware that in this event brothers were fighting brothers and sons were fighting fathers literally. The death toll is still the largest on record. More Americans lost their lives in the civil war then world war1, 2, and Vietnam combined. The shear loss of life is staggering. The point is that all these people are the same people...White, English/french descent (mainly) and at the very lease all were European descent. I have not included the brutal killing of African descent and native peoples who were caught up in this unfortunate mess.

Ethiopia / Eritrea is much like that. The prime minister of Ethiopia (Meles) and the prime minister of Eritrea (Isias) grew up together....I am told they have direct family ties ( this I am not sure).

We are all African people and regardless of our specific local (tribal ?) or as some may refer ethnic differences this is our common fact of life. Some may argue this....They just have to be reminded of the slaughter brought by Mussolini just before world war 2. He gassed, chopped and shot up Ethiopians and Eritreans with absolutely no regard for distinction....He wanted to kill 'blacks' in this region to make room for his new colony. Thanks be to God he failed.

There is a low level tension here in the states. The Eritrea's prefer to keep a firm community of "national' identity. Ethiopians are more apt to just keep going as would be normal for American life with a reserved although low level of grievance with Eritrea's. In general they atmosphere is civil and respectful. Their is a beautiful Eritrean owned restaurant in NJ which th owners call "ETHIOPIAN CUISINE". Me and Other Ethiopians eat there. I Also worship and take communion in Eritrean Orthodox Churches. Eritreans also worship and take communion at Ethiopian Orthodox Churches...my parish in particular has quite a few who attend regularly and our "Ethiopian" clergy celebrate with "Eritrean clergy" on special feast days.

As for "Sebhat Le Timketew" this is Ethiopic (geez) for: "Glory be to His baptism"
It is a phrase we use during the celebration of the Baptism of Jesus Christ...we all it Timket. I forgot how to say this in English.

Thanks for your interest.

 

Elisha

Protokentarchos
Joined
Feb 21, 2003
Messages
4,908
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
45
Location
NorCal
Amdetsion said:
Elisha

I am posting in the United States; NYC.
I forgot to answer that part of your query before ...sorry.
No problem. Again, click on 'Profile' at the top and you can add this information to display for everyone.

Amdetsion said:
Eritrean and Ethiopian people are one and the same. Our differences are ideological - sociopolitical.

Compare the huge senseless loss of life and property caused by the American civil war. Most people are not aware that in this event brothers were fighting brothers and sons were fighting fathers literally. The death toll is still the largest on record. More Americans lost their lives in the civil war then world war1, 2, and Vietnam combined. The shear loss of life is staggering. The point is that all these people are the same people...White, English/french descent (mainly) and at the very lease all were European descent. I have not included the brutal killing of African descent and native peoples who were caught up in this unfortunate mess.
I was told this before....but regarding the American Civil war, I knew it was bad but didn't know how bad.

Amdetsion said:
Ethiopia / Eritrea is much like that. The prime minister of Ethiopia (Meles) and the prime minister of Eritrea (Isias) grew up together....I am told they have direct family ties ( this I am not sure).

We are all African people and regardless of our specific local (tribal ?) or as some may refer ethnic differences this is our common fact of life. Some may argue this....They just have to be reminded of the slaughter brought by Mussolini just before world war 2. He gassed, chopped and shot up Ethiopians and Eritreans with absolutely no regard for distinction....He wanted to kill 'blacks' in this region to make room for his new colony. Thanks be to God he failed.
Very interesting.

Amdetsion said:
There is a low level tension here in the states. The Eritrea's prefer to keep a firm community of "national' identity. Ethiopians are more apt to just keep going as would be normal for American life with a reserved although low level of grievance with Eritrea's. In general they atmosphere is civil and respectful. Their is a beautiful Eritrean owned restaurant in NJ which th owners call "ETHIOPIAN CUISINE". Me and Other Ethiopians eat there. I Also worship and take communion in Eritrean Orthodox Churches. Eritreans also worship and take communion at Ethiopian Orthodox Churches...my parish in particular has quite a few who attend regularly and our "Ethiopian" clergy celebrate with "Eritrean clergy" on special feast days.

As for "Sebhat Le Timketew" this is Ethiopic (geez) for: "Glory be to His baptism"
It is a phrase we use during the celebration of the Baptism of Jesus Christ...we all it Timket. I forgot how to say this in English.

Thanks for your interest.
This is about what I thought (and my priest thinks). Economically/organizationally, he seems to think that the Ethiopians have their act together better than the Eritreans, as there are some Ethiopian churches in the SF Bay Area but I don't think there are any Ertitrean churches - just a few scattered priests.
 

Amdetsion

High Elder
Joined
Nov 22, 2004
Messages
931
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Elisha

I will update my profile. Had intended long before but just had not got to it.

I Found the word I was looking for 'Epiphany'. This word is equal to our "Timketew".
 
Top