Give me five ...

biro

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The Orthodox Church and The Orthodox Way - Bp. Kallistos Ware

Great Lent - Fr. Alexander Schmemann

Icons and Saints of the Eastern Orthodox Church - Alfredo Tradigo

Living the Liturgy - Fr. Stanley Harakas


Just some ideas.  :)
 

ozgeorge

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The Orthodox Study Bible (if they are English Speaking)

The Epistle of St. James- (every day for the rest of their lives)

The Orthodox Church and The Orthodox Way - Bp. Kallistos Ware

The Sayings of the Desert Fathers

The Evergetinos
 

orthonorm

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ozgeorge said:
The Epistle of St. James- (every day for the rest of their lives)

The Evergetinos
ozgeorge,

I respect and enjoy your thoughtful posts, could you amplify why you think St. James' Epistle is so important? And why the Evergetinos? Never heard recommended for new folks before.

Thanks.
 

orthonorm

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New here, so grain of salt and all that:

The Bible. Not being sarcastic. Don't like the OSB. Single-paragraph NKJV for "simple" reading. The Oxford Annotated RSV for a more studied approach.

Read along during Liturgy time from time. (This is my sneaky way of suggesting going to Liturgy in the long run probably going to be more helpful than any text. Has been for me)

ozgeorge mentioned the Sayings of the Desert Fathers. I could reduced that to the sayings of St. Anthony. I could even reduce that to his first two sayings.

Fr. Alexander Schemann's Great Lent. I know it ain't Lent right now, but not only did it make Lent much more accesible, it makes the liturgy, prayer, fasting, acts of mercy, the life of a Christian, clear and concise. I read it over and over. A treasure.

Bp. Kallistos Ware's texts I guess, since a lot of people seem to get a lot out of them, not me so much. But so many people do, so I am tossing them in here.

biro! I just noticed you listed Great Lent as well! Glad my suggestion doesn't sound so odd afterall.
 

Ioannis Climacus

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The Bible

The Way of the Pilgrim

The Ladder of Divine Ascent

Eusebius' Church History

Everything St. John Chrysostom ever wrote*

*Yeah, technically its not just one book, but read it anyway.
 

Jibrail Almuhajir

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orthonorm said:
ozgeorge mentioned the Sayings of the Desert Fathers. I could reduced that to the sayings of St. Anthony. I could even reduce that to his first two sayings.
I wouldn't sacrifice the entire treasury of saints in favor of a few saying of just one.  After all, the Bible is an empty letter without the experience and testimonies of the saints.  You'll rob and do yourself a huge disservice by not feasting on all of their words.

And why don't you like the OSB?
 

ozgeorge

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orthonorm said:
ozgeorge said:
The Epistle of St. James- (every day for the rest of their lives)

The Evergetinos
ozgeorge,

I respect and enjoy your thoughtful posts, could you amplify why you think St. James' Epistle is so important? And why the Evergetinos? Never heard recommended for new folks before.

Thanks.
The Epistle of St. James is, in my opinion, "The Practical Guide to Being a Christian". It is an excellent "examination of the conscience". I have been reading it daily for about 10 years and it never fails to provide me with something new each day. The reason I started this practice of it's daily reading was that it was recommended by Eldress Gavrilia. She recommends reading one chapter of the Gospel, one chapter of Acts or the Epistles and the entire epistle of St. James daily.
The Evergetinos is, like the Sayings of the Desert Fathers, a treasury of wisdom and again, a practical guide to being a Christian. And like GabrieltheCelt above, I wouldn't exclude anything from them in favour of just one Father. But I think it is important to read only one Father at a time.


 

wayseer

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ozgeorge said:
The Orthodox Study Bible (if they are English Speaking)

The Epistle of St. James- (every day for the rest of their lives)

The Orthodox Church and The Orthodox Way - Bp. Kallistos Ware

The Sayings of the Desert Fathers

The Evergetinos
Thank you.  Have Ware and The Sayings.  Will look into the others.
 

wayseer

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Ioannis Climacus said:
The Bible

The Way of the Pilgrim

The Ladder of Divine Ascent

Eusebius' Church History

Everything St. John Chrysostom ever wrote*

*Yeah, technically its not just one book, but read it anyway.
I can tick Eusebius.  The Way is a definite must for the future.   Will look into the others.
 

biro

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Just a thought- if you go to Google Books and look up the name of St. John Chrysostom, they have some files of his books, which I think you can get as PDFs.  :) 
 

88Devin12

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I'll recommend Fr. Thomas Hopko's four books entitled "The Orthodox Faith", they are a very good spot to begin.

There are free, online versions here on the OCA's website:
http://www.oca.org/OCorthfaith.asp
 

Cognomen

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Ioannis Climacus said:
The Ladder of Divine Ascent
Everything St. John Chrysostom ever wrote*
*Yeah, technically its not just one book, but read it anyway.
These are wonderful and potentially transforming selections, but they also may not be the best for someone "new to Orthodoxy."  Stringent monastic instructions/advanced spiritual warfare and heavy, sometimes uncompromising Patristics can be a bit overwhelming for those beginning their inquiry.  Obviously it depends on the mindset of the inquirer, but I don't know too many priests who would advise similarly for intro material.  That said, these works greatly inspired and informed me.  [Edit: Didn't see your introductory post stating that you were studying Theology in University.  If this book request is for you, probably disregard or at least alter my caution accordingly.  Oh, and welcome!].

Some great ones listed in this thread though.  

The Divine Liturgy "clicks" better for some people than others.  I think it's important not to neglect this aspect, so buying a copy to read could be very helpful.  Additionally, while I don't think Living the Liturgy is a great book (almost a lengthy pamphlet), it helped me understand what is going on and what is expected during the worship service.  

I'll third the recommendation for Great Lent.  

I also found the Orthodox Study Bible helpful.  Is it perfect? Certainly not, but it has a lot of introductory information and explanations from Orthodox perspectives, usually within a scriptural context.  Additionally, many Inquiry/Catechumen classes use it.  I think it's a good starting point.  
 

orthonorm

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GabrieltheCelt said:
orthonorm said:
ozgeorge mentioned the Sayings of the Desert Fathers. I could reduced that to the sayings of St. Anthony. I could even reduce that to his first two sayings.
I wouldn't sacrifice the entire treasury of saints in favor of a few saying of just one.  After all, the Bible is an empty letter without the experience and testimonies of the saints.  You'll rob and do yourself a huge disservice by not feasting on all of their words.

And why don't you like the OSB?
Seems rhetoric gets parsed here very literally. My point being, those first quotes for ME as a NEWBIE say a lot and answer a lot. I was using a hyperbole to suggest a nugget of truth about those first two sayings.

Work.
Pray.
Mind your business.

Now since I usually ignore all that, I keep reading them.

And the question wasn't: What should I read for the rest of my life?
 

orthonorm

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ozgeorge said:
orthonorm said:
ozgeorge said:
The Epistle of St. James- (every day for the rest of their lives)

The Evergetinos
ozgeorge,

I respect and enjoy your thoughtful posts, could you amplify why you think St. James' Epistle is so important? And why the Evergetinos? Never heard recommended for new folks before.

Thanks.
The Epistle of St. James is, in my opinion, "The Practical Guide to Being a Christian". It is an excellent "examination of the conscience". I have been reading it daily for about 10 years and it never fails to provide me with something new each day. The reason I started this practice of it's daily reading was that it was recommended by Eldress Gavrilia. She recommends reading one chapter of the Gospel, one chapter of Acts or the Epistles and the entire epistle of St. James daily.
The Evergetinos is, like the Sayings of the Desert Fathers, a treasury of wisdom and again, a practical guide to being a Christian. And like GabrieltheCelt above, I wouldn't exclude anything from them in favour of just one Father. But I think it is important to read only one Father at a time.
Thanks, I've been following Fr. Hopko's advice in If We Confess our Sins in terms of examination.

My daily Scripture reading practice has been to try to read:

Chapter of a Gospel through to the end before moving onto the next Gospel.
Chapter of an Epistle of Acts or the Apocalypse through to before moving on the next text
Some Psalms
And a Chapter of book from the OT again through till the end, then move on to another.

That keeps me busy with work and other reading an all, but will sub in for a while St. James' Epistle for a while for the non-Gospel NT reading. Per your advice.

Thank you.

 

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On the Incarnation by St Athanasius is the only one I can think of that hasn't been offered.
 

Jibrail Almuhajir

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wayseer said:
ozgeorge said:
The Orthodox Study Bible (if they are English Speaking)

The Epistle of St. James- (every day for the rest of their lives)

The Orthodox Church and The Orthodox Way - Bp. Kallistos Ware

The Sayings of the Desert Fathers

The Evergetinos
Thank you.  Have Ware and The Sayings.  Will look into the others.
I'm certain you didn't know, but we should avoid calling a Metropolitan by his last name.  If you want the correct etiquette, it's Metropolitan KALLISTOS Ware.
 

Jibrail Almuhajir

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orthonorm said:
GabrieltheCelt said:
orthonorm said:
ozgeorge mentioned the Sayings of the Desert Fathers. I could reduced that to the sayings of St. Anthony. I could even reduce that to his first two sayings.
I wouldn't sacrifice the entire treasury of saints in favor of a few saying of just one.  After all, the Bible is an empty letter without the experience and testimonies of the saints.  You'll rob and do yourself a huge disservice by not feasting on all of their words.

And why don't you like the OSB?
Seems rhetoric gets parsed here very literally. My point being, those first quotes for ME as a NEWBIE say a lot and answer a lot. I was using a hyperbole to suggest a nugget of truth about those first two sayings.

Work.
Pray.
Mind your business.

Now since I usually ignore all that, I keep reading them.

And the question wasn't: What should I read for the rest of my life?
Sure thing, bubba.  But I didn't realize there was a question.  I could be way off, but you seem to be wound up pretty tight.  I've got a piece of coal... can I get a diamond back?  :)
 

wayseer

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Cognomen said:
Ioannis Climacus said:
The Ladder of Divine Ascent
Everything St. John Chrysostom ever wrote*
*Yeah, technically its not just one book, but read it anyway.
These are wonderful and potentially transforming selections, but they also may not be the best for someone "new to Orthodoxy."  Stringent monastic instructions/advanced spiritual warfare and heavy, sometimes uncompromising Patristics can be a bit overwhelming for those beginning their inquiry.  Obviously it depends on the mindset of the inquirer, but I don't know too many priests who would advise similarly for intro material.  That said, these works greatly inspired and informed me.  [Edit: Didn't see your introductory post stating that you were studying Theology in University.  If this book request is for you, probably disregard or at least alter my caution accordingly.  Oh, and welcome!].

Some great ones listed in this thread though.  

The Divine Liturgy "clicks" better for some people than others.  I think it's important not to neglect this aspect, so buying a copy to read could be very helpful.  Additionally, while I don't think Living the Liturgy is a great book (almost a lengthy pamphlet), it helped me understand what is going on and what is expected during the worship service.  

I'll third the recommendation for Great Lent.  

I also found the Orthodox Study Bible helpful.  Is it perfect? Certainly not, but it has a lot of introductory information and explanations from Orthodox perspectives, usually within a scriptural context.  Additionally, many Inquiry/Catechumen classes use it.  I think it's a good starting point.  
Thank you for your thoughts and words of welcome.

And I will certainly be acquiring the Orthodoxy Study Bible.
 

Volnutt

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GabrieltheCelt said:
I'm certain you didn't know, but we should avoid calling a Metropolitan by his last name.  If you want the correct etiquette, it's Metropolitan KALLISTOS Ware.
Oh and in case you didn't know, Poppy, he's not yelling at you-allcaps is just traditional for a Metropolitan's first name.
 

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I would suggest "Unseen Warfare" (by Lorenzo Scupoli / St. Nicodemus of the Holy Mountain / St. Theophan the Recluse), rather than "The Ladder of Divine Ascent". They are similar books, but the former is more suitable to the layman, while the latter is better for more advanced people and monastics.
 

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wayseer said:
... books that you think someone who is new to Orthodoxy should read.
My personal favs, in no particular order:

The Way of the Pilgrim
(and The Pilgrim Continues His Way), usually printed together in the same volume

Searching for Icons in Russia by Vladimir Soloukhin

Unseen Warfare


The Arena, by St. Ignatius Brianchaninov

The Orthodox Church
by Timothy Ware (for a general overview of the Church)

The Orthodox Church
was the first book I ever read on Orthodoxy (over 40 years ago) and I still think it is a good introduction for those with little knowledge of the Orthodox Church.

The other four are just my favorite Orthodox books (other than the Scriptures, the Lives of the Saints [this could be its own category] and, especially, the Psalter) - books that I re-read at least every few years. The Psalter I read every day.

The best thing for a newbie, though, is to just go to the services.
 

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When I saw the title I thought the rest of it would be "minutes alone". Am disappoint. Anyway, my tippy-top five...

- Sayings of the Desert Fathers
- Way of the Ascetics, by Tito Colliander
- Gregory of Nazanzus: An Intellectual Biography, by Fr. John Anthony McGuckin
- Man and the God-Man, by St. Justin Popovich
- Sex and Society in the World of the Orthodox Slavs, 900-1700, by Eve Levin

If people can get through those they'll be on their way...  8)
 

trevor72694

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-The Orthodox Study Bible (or an Orthodox interpretation of the NT), unless you can read the original.

-Fr. Arsenei

-The Way of a Pilgrim

-The Forgotten Medacine: The mystery of repentance by Seraphim Aleksiev

-The Orthodox Church by Timothy Ware

Also, I would throw in a catechism.  There isn't an official Church catechism, but it's good to have one for reference.  I prefer the one by Bishop (Saint) Nickolai Velemirovich.

 

Ioannis Climacus

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In light of what I know now, I would recommend these (in this order) :

Patristic Theology by Fr. John Romanides

Monastic Wisdom by Elder Joseph the Hesychast

The Way of the Pilgrim

The Ascetical Homilies of St. Isaac the Syrian

The Ladder of Divine Ascent

The first is pretty much essential. Fr. John, out of every Orthodox writer I have ever read or even heard of, provides the single most accurate description of Orthodoxy. There is a good deal of misinformation on the subject (from both Orthodox and non-Orthodox sources alike), and this book is invaluable in acquiring a correct understanding. The rest will assist in learning noetic prayer, which should be a priority from the beginning.
 
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