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Historic unions of EO with the Armenians

Iconodule

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Some tantalizing incidents came to my attention, of which I can find only scattered and vague online information:

1. Supposedly, in 1885 or 1886 a decision was taken by the EO Church of Constantinople for intercommunion with Armenians, recognizing their priesthood and sacraments. Whether this was for Armenians in Constantinople or with the Armenian church generally, I don't know. Nor can I tell if the decision was ever officially rescinded.

2. Several local synods (e.g. Tarsus) were held in the late 12th-early 13th century agreeing to union with the Armenians; the final ratification of this was prevented by the sack of Constantinople in the 4th Crusade.

3. Even earlier, Patriarch Photius' legate approved a union at the Synod of Ani. I did find mention of a "Council of Ani" in an online book about Armenian canon law but it describes a council held well after St. Photius' repose and dealing with a purely internal matter.

Does anyone with access to relevant Greek or Armenian material know anything about this?
 

Iconodule

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After some google magic I found this article on the 12th century negotiations... a fascinating read: https://www.academia.edu/31531275/_Breathing_life_into_those_who_were_like_corpses_Byzantine-Armenian_Negotiations_for_Church_Union_c.1165-1180_and_their_consequences_until_c.1265

 

KostaC

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Iconodule said:
Some tantalizing incidents came to my attention, of which I can find only scattered and vague online information:

1. Supposedly, in 1885 or 1886 a decision was taken by the EO Church of Constantinople for intercommunion with Armenians, recognizing their priesthood and sacraments. Whether this was for Armenians in Constantinople or with the Armenian church generally, I don't know. Nor can I tell if the decision was ever officially rescinded.

2. Several local synods (e.g. Tarsus) were held in the late 12th-early 13th century agreeing to union with the Armenians; the final ratification of this was prevented by the sack of Constantinople in the 4th Crusade.

3. Even earlier, Patriarch Photius' legate approved a union at the Synod of Ani. I did find mention of a "Council of Ani" in an online book about Armenian canon law but it describes a council held well after St. Photius' repose and dealing with a purely internal matter.

Does anyone with access to relevant Greek or Armenian material know anything about this?
There's an article on academia.edu about the almost-reunions during the late 1000's to about the mid-1100's. Let me see if I can find it in my list of articles I've requested links for, it's good stuff.

I don't think that it's a coincidence that the Komnenoi were of Armenian descent and they were the ones to push for it on the Roman side. I doubt that all of the big dynasties had generational-amnesia and had no recollection of their ancestors being Armenian-speakers.
 

KostaC

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Iconodule said:
After some google magic I found this article on the 12th century negotiations... a fascinating read: https://www.academia.edu/31531275/_Breathing_life_into_those_who_were_like_corpses_Byzantine-Armenian_Negotiations_for_Church_Union_c.1165-1180_and_their_consequences_until_c.1265
Kill myself, it's the very link I was about to go look for. I wish I had read the above first.
 

Iconodule

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Armenian lineage was pretty common in the noble families in Constantinople (didn't stop them from being insufferable snobs though) but I don't think the Komnenoi had any major descent from Armenia.
 

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In the 12th century, a Byzantine emperor was impressed by an Armenian emissary, who told him about the Armenian faith.  The Byzantine emperor was deeply convinced enough to start all procedures and get things going -- to allow the Churches to reunite.  In the height of his efforts, the Byzantine emperor suddenly died.  No one knows the cause of his death.

The matter of reunion was then shelved till 19th/20th/21st centuries  . . .

--Sv.
 

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Another interesting fact:  Emperor Justinian was most impressed with the Armenian Apostolic Orthodox cathedral in the city of Shusha, capital of Karabagh (now in Azerbajian).

-- Sv.
 

CoptoGeek

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Svetlana said:
In the 12th century, a Byzantine emperor was impressed by an Armenian emissary, who told him about the Armenian faith.  The Byzantine emperor was deeply convinced enough to start all procedures and get things going -- to allow the Churches to reunite.  In the height of his efforts, the Byzantine emperor suddenly died.  No one knows the cause of his death.

The matter of reunion was then shelved till 19th/20th/21st centuries  . . .

--Sv.
I think that was during the time of Saint Nerses the Gracious. That history is chronicled here:

Saint Nerses the Gracious and Church Unity: Armeno-Greek Church Relations (1165-1173)
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/9953014426/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o01__o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
 

IreneOlinyk

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Iconodule said:
Some tantalizing incidents came to my attention, of which I can find only scattered and vague online information:

1. Supposedly, in 1885 or 1886 a decision was taken by the EO Church of Constantinople for intercommunion with Armenians, recognizing their priesthood and sacraments. Whether this was for Armenians in Constantinople or with the Armenian church generally, I don't know. Nor can I tell if the decision was ever officially rescinded.
Can you provide a reference to this?  Where did you find your info?  An act of a synod for example?  1885-86 is already the modern era.  For example, in 1848 there is the famous "Encyclical of the Eastern Patriarchs, A Reply to the Epistle of Pope Pius IX, "to the Easterns".  Secondly, The Patriarchal Encyclical of 1895:
A Reply to the Papal Encyclical of Pope Leo XIII, on Reunion. 

 

Alpha60

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Iconodule said:
Some tantalizing incidents came to my attention, of which I can find only scattered and vague online information:

1. Supposedly, in 1885 or 1886 a decision was taken by the EO Church of Constantinople for intercommunion with Armenians, recognizing their priesthood and sacraments. Whether this was for Armenians in Constantinople or with the Armenian church generally, I don't know. Nor can I tell if the decision was ever officially rescinded.

2. Several local synods (e.g. Tarsus) were held in the late 12th-early 13th century agreeing to union with the Armenians; the final ratification of this was prevented by the sack of Constantinople in the 4th Crusade.

3. Even earlier, Patriarch Photius' legate approved a union at the Synod of Ani. I did find mention of a "Council of Ani" in an online book about Armenian canon law but it describes a council held well after St. Photius' repose and dealing with a purely internal matter.

Does anyone with access to relevant Greek or Armenian material know anything about this?
This to me sounds a lot like the planned merger of the Greek and Coptic churches of Alexandria in the 19th century, which was thwarted by the Albanian Khedive, who feared the implications of a united Egyptian Orthodox church. 
 
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