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How are your computers?

Alpha60

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So, how is everyone’s gear running?  Anyone having any technical problems, or questions?
 

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In regards to the forum or in general?! IS THERE SOMETHING ON THE OCNET END I SHOULD KNOW?!!!!

;D

For the most part, my gear is fine. Though at this point, I think HP should just pack it in and tell everyone to run Linux on their rigs. Out of all the PCs I've had and: the two I currently have and the one relative who always asks you for IT help has, only HP computers are this finicky with Windows 10. Everytime I update some crazy esoteric thing (registry, power modes, etc) after any W10 update all the HP computers decide they have been specifically designed for Amish communities. I don't have this problem with any other PC, just Hewlett Packard. Seriously, my dual boot Mac plays nicer with Windows 10 than the HP computers that have, in theory, been designed for it.
 

Arachne

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Chugging along. Six-year-old laptop that needed a replacement battery recently and can hiccup a little following a big Windows update, but (touch wood) not looking for a replacement yet. Not a whiz, but trusty little thing.
 

Alpha60

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FormerReformer said:
In regards to the forum or in general?! IS THERE SOMETHING ON THE OCNET END I SHOULD KNOW?!!!!

;D

For the most part, my gear is fine. Though at this point, I think HP should just pack it in and tell everyone to run Linux on their rigs. Out of all the PCs I've had and: the two I currently have and the one relative who always asks you for IT help has, only HP computers are this finicky with Windows 10. Everytime I update some crazy esoteric thing (registry, power modes, etc) after any W10 update all the HP computers decide they have been specifically designed for Amish communities. I don't have this problem with any other PC, just Hewlett Packard. Seriously, my dual boot Mac plays nicer with Windows 10 than the HP computers that have, in theory, been designed for it.
What kind of HP products are you running?  The EliteBook series is comparable to Thinkpads.

Historically I always disliked HP hardware, but last year I purchased an HP pavillion laptop, running Windows 10, and it is quite a nice laptop in terms of its cooling system; however, I am not sure there is a Linux driver available that implements the unique cooling system (which requires, however, that the operating system poll various sensors on the underside of their box; a better solution would use sensors tied into a separate hardware management console, and indeed the newest Macs have a very interesting hardware management console). 

The main headache with Macs is the keyboard layout, which is different from the PC and UNIX layouts.  The three best keyboards you can get which are still mass produced, by the way, are the UniComp M seriee, derived from the legendary IBM model M, which uses a classic buckling spring mechanism for glorious clickyness; the Keytronics generic USB keyboards, which are still made using vintage beige plastic, but which are made by one of the largest keyboard OEMs in the business, and which have the best modern style internal switch in responsiveness on a desktop keyboard (an honorable mention goes to the IBM/Lenovo keyboards from the mid 2000s are also very good in this regard; much quieter then, but not as fun as the Model M which had been replaced by its predecessor), and finally the Sun Microsystems / Oracle Sun Type 7 USB keyboard in UNIX layout.  Not the PC version, but the -U for Unix option.  This layout closely resembles that on a standard PC, the chief difference being the control key is where Capslock also is located, and the Escape key is where ~ usually is; far from being annoying, this layout is paradise on Unix/Linux/BSD and even helpful in Windows if you are frequently sshing into Linux / UNIX shells, OSes which implement EMACS in-line editing shortcuts, chiefly, Cisco IOS (not to be confused with Apple iOS; IOS proper is a highly specialized OS that runs mainly on MIPS and Power CPUs on different Cisco machines), people who like to use UNIX software on Windows (ports of vim, emacs, or a system like Cygwin or Microsoft’s own SUA subsystem), and pretty much anyone else who finds they are making too many very wide keystrokes with their left pinky and ring fingers).

Of course you can remap any of the above, but the width of the relocated keys is altered, just like on a Mac keyboard.  On my iMac, I use an Apple bluetooth keyboard which came with it for Mac control sequences and one of the three mentioned best keyboars mentioned above.

The very best keyboard is the full width IBM ThinkPad style keyboard; I used to have five of them, I still have one, and they rock, because it gives you ThinkPad keyboard functions.  The downside is they are fragile.  The model number you want if your goal is to find a used one (these and the Sun type 7 are no longer made, but occasionally you can get them New In Box) is the 31P8950.  The non full width variety is still fairly common and I have two of these for use on some new desks I bought which feature rather too narrow keyboard trays.
 

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FormerReformer said:
In regards to the forum or in general?! IS THERE SOMETHING ON THE OCNET END I SHOULD KNOW?!!!!

;D

For the most part, my gear is fine. Though at this point, I think HP should just pack it in and tell everyone to run Linux on their rigs. Out of all the PCs I've had and: the two I currently have and the one relative who always asks you for IT help has, only HP computers are this finicky with Windows 10. Everytime I update some crazy esoteric thing (registry, power modes, etc) after any W10 update all the HP computers decide they have been specifically designed for Amish communities. I don't have this problem with any other PC, just Hewlett Packard. Seriously, my dual boot Mac plays nicer with Windows 10 than the HP computers that have, in theory, been designed for it.
No kidding. I bought a cheap HP notebook for writing papers and occasional work notes in February, and I used it exactly three times before an update corrupted the mousepad driver.

I was able to fix it with a driver from freakin' 2006, but I was really amazed at how quickly my skepticism about buying the HP had proved true.
 

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Arachne said:
Chugging along. Six-year-old laptop that needed a replacement battery recently and can hiccup a little following a big Windows update, but (touch wood) not looking for a replacement yet. Not a whiz, but trusty little thing.
Brilko said:
Ancient and slow.
biro said:
Mediocre.
Might I ask you all what specs and what brand you are running?
 

Alpha60

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Agabus said:
FormerReformer said:
In regards to the forum or in general?! IS THERE SOMETHING ON THE OCNET END I SHOULD KNOW?!!!!

;D

For the most part, my gear is fine. Though at this point, I think HP should just pack it in and tell everyone to run Linux on their rigs. Out of all the PCs I've had and: the two I currently have and the one relative who always asks you for IT help has, only HP computers are this finicky with Windows 10. Everytime I update some crazy esoteric thing (registry, power modes, etc) after any W10 update all the HP computers decide they have been specifically designed for Amish communities. I don't have this problem with any other PC, just Hewlett Packard. Seriously, my dual boot Mac plays nicer with Windows 10 than the HP computers that have, in theory, been designed for it.
No kidding. I bought a cheap HP notebook for writing papers and occasional work notes in February, and I used it exactly three times before an update corrupted the mousepad driver.

I was able to fix it with a driver from freakin' 2006, but I was really amazed at how quickly my skepticism about buying the HP had proved true.
Now I haven’t had any problems with my HP at all from an OS standpoint.  The main reason I might sell it is simply because I am, as stated in my post on keyboards above, a ThinkPad man, and the HP keyboard is radically different from, indeed a polar opposite to, ThinkPad keyboards.  This was not always the case; their EliteBooks in many cases closely resemble ThinkPads.

I like laptop hardware from the period of Windows Vista and Windows 7, when, running Linux, are more than adequete for a lot of what I do (Windows 7 is also still fun to play with and run older computer games on; I also have virtual machines running Windows 98 for this purpose and I have one remaining box with XP, among other OSes, installed.
 

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Alpha60 said:
Arachne said:
Chugging along. Six-year-old laptop that needed a replacement battery recently and can hiccup a little following a big Windows update, but (touch wood) not looking for a replacement yet. Not a whiz, but trusty little thing.
Might I ask you all what specs and what brand you are running?
Asus, no idea what generation (10.1' netbook family). Came with Win8, transitioned smoothly to Win10. Browser of choice remains Firefox, with Chrome only as backup.
 

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Arachne said:
Alpha60 said:
Arachne said:
Chugging along. Six-year-old laptop that needed a replacement battery recently and can hiccup a little following a big Windows update, but (touch wood) not looking for a replacement yet. Not a whiz, but trusty little thing.
Might I ask you all what specs and what brand you are running?
Asus, no idea what generation (10.1' netbook family). Came with Win8, transitioned smoothly to Win10. Browser of choice remains Firefox, with Chrome only as backup.
Do you know how much RAM and CPU you have?  It sounds like you have a trusty little thing.  Are you on a solid state disk?  One thing you should make sure you are doing, especially for older laptops, where this can be more of a risk, is backing up, to a USB stick, the cloud, a home NAS, or other device, as wear and tear from laptop movement on hard disks, especially mechanical ones, but also SSDs, which can and do fail in the wild, can be deadly to your data.

By the way, browser-wise, that sounds very good.  :)

My personal favorite on the PC has always been Opera, which used to be very eccentric and do very weird things, routinely requiring me to fall back to a more common browser, until at last, they scrapped the Presto rendering engine and started using WebKit (which is, like Firefox, fully open source; it started out as the KHTML rendering engine in Konqueror, the default browser in the KDE desktop environment used on many Linux operating systems, then Apple adopted it for Safari, and it blossomed from there to being the most widely used rendering engine, powering Chrome, Opera, and other browsers, although there are modifications and performance tweaks, so not all KHTML/WebKit browsers are identical, they merely share a bothersome and high maintenance portion of their codebase.
 

Arachne

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Alpha60 said:
Arachne said:
Alpha60 said:
Arachne said:
Chugging along. Six-year-old laptop that needed a replacement battery recently and can hiccup a little following a big Windows update, but (touch wood) not looking for a replacement yet. Not a whiz, but trusty little thing.
Might I ask you all what specs and what brand you are running?
Asus, no idea what generation (10.1' netbook family). Came with Win8, transitioned smoothly to Win10. Browser of choice remains Firefox, with Chrome only as backup.
Do you know how much RAM and CPU you have?
Celeron 1007U @1.50 GHz, 4.00 GB RAM. Not too shabby.
 

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Arachne said:
Alpha60 said:
Arachne said:
Alpha60 said:
Arachne said:
Chugging along. Six-year-old laptop that needed a replacement battery recently and can hiccup a little following a big Windows update, but (touch wood) not looking for a replacement yet. Not a whiz, but trusty little thing.
Might I ask you all what specs and what brand you are running?
Asus, no idea what generation (10.1' netbook family). Came with Win8, transitioned smoothly to Win10. Browser of choice remains Firefox, with Chrome only as backup.
Do you know how much RAM and CPU you have?
Celeron 1007U @1.50 GHz, 4.00 GB RAM. Not too shabby.
Indeed.  I remember my first computer with 4 GB of memory; it was a glorious experience.  A Sun Ultra 24 workstation with 4 GB of ECC RAM, the kind used on servers, to provide increased reliability.
 

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I have a Hewlett Packard laptop. One TB of memory. Most of it is filled with music and video games. :) I use it for writing as well.

My browser is Firefox.
 

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biro said:
I have a Hewlett Packard laptop. One TB of memory. Most of it is filled with music and video games. :) I use it for writing as well.

My browser is Firefox.
1 TB of disk space surely?  1 TB of memory, that is to say, RAM, is an extremely high amount; that kind of memory you get only on an expensive, relatively high end server.  I would be surprised to find even a gaming rig with a terabyte of memory. :)

I remember back in 2009 IBM came out with a mainframe which had 2 TB of RAM and it was love at first sight.  It was a special configuration of the IBM z/10, which is my favorite model of IBM mainframe, capable of running Linux, but lacking the Intel cpus of the later mainframes; it consisted solely of classic IBM mainframe CPUs compatible with software written in the 1960s, running at a breathtaking 5 GhZ.  It had a nice range of operating systems, too: z/VM, which is a virtualization OS or hypervisor similiar to VMware, which can run any of the other OSes that are compatible with IBM system Z, z/CPM, a single user OS designed to be operated as a virtual machine on top of z/VM, two varieties of Linux officially supported (Red Hat and Novell), z/OS, which is the flagship general purpose operating system with the most advanced facilities for software development, security, and reliability, and a direct descendant of the groundbreaking OS/360 operating system developed by IBM in the 1960s, z/VSE, a stripped down mainframe OS that lacks some of the nice features of z/OS and is kind of a legacy system; it is descended from DOS/360, which was intended as a stopgap when the OS/360 project experienced delays, and finally, z/TPF, a completely automated high speed transaction processing operating system used by airlines, banks, credit card companies and so on for mission-critical applications (like approving credit card transactions, generating bank statements, issuing boarding passes for ticketed passengers, computing load factors on commercial flights and so on).  z/PF has to be programmed using z/OS if memory serves, as it lacks any kind of built-in security features.

But the main thrill would be running Linux and z/OS at 5 ghz on 2 TB of memory.  The predeccessors of z/OS were relatively difficult to use compared to modern operating systems, but in the 2000s IBM added a UNIX subsystem to system Z, making it comparable to Linux in terms of ease of use (once you had the system up and running; configuring an IBM mainframe is fiendishly difficult and there is a special class of Systems Programmers whose sole job is to install and configure the operating systems and application software on each mainframe).

There is a free, open source IBM mainframe emulator called Hercules, published by the famous YouTube celebrity known as “Tron Guy”, which can run both vintage and modern mainframe operating systems.  It is much faster than vintage IBM mainframes and much slower compared to modern systems.
 

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I run Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit on a custom built PC (circa 2009) with an Intel Pentium E5200 running at 2.5 GHz with 4 GB of RAM and a 160 GB hard drive.  I may try to upgrade my rig to Windows 10 when Microsoft no longer provides security updates for Windows 7 in January 2020.  Else, I'll buy a new rig with 8 GB (or more) of RAM just to run Firefox.  :D
 

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SolEX01 said:
I run Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit on a custom built PC (circa 2009) with an Intel Pentium E5200 running at 2.5 GHz with 4 GB of RAM and a 160 GB hard drive.  I may try to upgrade my rig to Windows 10 when Microsoft no longer provides security updates for Windows 7 in January 2020.  Else, I'll buy a new rig with 8 GB (or more) of RAM just to run Firefox.  :D
You, sir, have an impressively small hard disk.  The fact that you haven't used it all up points to great operational discipline on your part.

I have to confess I dislike all Home versions of Windows, because they lack Remote Desktop and are a pain to remotely administer.
 

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Arachne said:
Alpha60 said:
Arachne said:
Chugging along. Six-year-old laptop that needed a replacement battery recently and can hiccup a little following a big Windows update, but (touch wood) not looking for a replacement yet. Not a whiz, but trusty little thing.
Might I ask you all what specs and what brand you are running?
Asus, no idea what generation (10.1' netbook family). Came with Win8, transitioned smoothly to Win10. Browser of choice remains Firefox, with Chrome only as backup.
Sounds nice.  Asus and Acer have really started putting out a top-flight product these days.  I also loved how, a few years ago, when Acer did a joint marketing deal with Ferrari, for Ferrari branded laptops to compete with Dell XPS and Alienware and HP Voodoo gaming rigs, Asus responded with a deal with Lamborghini for Lambo-branded laptops, which were produced in an awesome yellow shade.

Lenovo of course, being Lenovo, remained above the fray.  Producing a dedicated gaming rig would be beneath their dignity as the heir to IBM's  Intel hardware division.
 

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Alpha60 said:
SolEX01 said:
I run Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit on a custom built PC (circa 2009) with an Intel Pentium E5200 running at 2.5 GHz with 4 GB of RAM and a 160 GB hard drive.  I may try to upgrade my rig to Windows 10 when Microsoft no longer provides security updates for Windows 7 in January 2020.  Else, I'll buy a new rig with 8 GB (or more) of RAM just to run Firefox.  :D
You, sir, have an impressively small hard disk.  The fact that you haven't used it all up points to great operational discipline on your part.
Christ is Risen!

I'm using 88.182 GB; 42.675 GB is being used by the Windows folder and 3.223 GB is used for my "Space" folder where I store my documents, etc.  I don't store a lot of pictures and videos on my computer; I have 65 GB worth of USB flash drives in case I need additional storage.  I could delete some downloaded ISO files to free up some space.  I also have an 80 GB hard drive that has LINUX.  Ideally, I use the GRUB boot loader on the 80 GB drive to boot Windows 7; however, I told the BIOS to boot Windows 7 from the 160 GB drive so Windows Backup can work.

Alpha60 said:
I have to confess I dislike all Home versions of Windows, because they lack Remote Desktop and are a pain to remotely administer.
There are remote administration tools out there; I prefer the Professional versions of Windows as well because they have support for encryption.
 

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I have a Phenom II rig with 8GB of RAM that I built years back when I had enough energy to fool with such things.
 

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biro said:
Mine's still slow. It was a little bit better today, though.
Christ is Risen!

Since you have a 1 TB hard drive, try defragmenting it.  Over time, large files get divided into smaller pieces that are spread out all over the disk and the drive spends time trying to piece the smaller pieces together.  More information can be found here.
 

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Since the forum came back up on Bright Monday, I am still noticing two problems. I could not get on the site at all on 4/29. Today, 4/30, On my windows desktop, I was able to get the main page up, but could not get into the forum. Eventually I was able to get into both. On my Mac, however, I can get into the forum but cannot get to the main page where the articles, etc are. Normally I could just go to orthodoxchristianity.net and then click into the forum from there. I've attached a screen shot (hopefully it came through) of the message I am still getting when I go to orthodoxchristianity.net. If I type orthodoxchristianity.net/forum into the browser on my Mac I can get to the forum only.

 

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Hope the internet IT checks for malware and runs Anti-Virus
 

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noahzarc1 said:
Since the forum came back up on Bright Monday, I am still noticing two problems. I could not get on the site at all on 4/29. Today, 4/30, On my windows desktop, I was able to get the main page up, but could not get into the forum. Eventually I was able to get into both. On my Mac, however, I can get into the forum but cannot get to the main page where the articles, etc are. Normally I could just go to orthodoxchristianity.net and then click into the forum from there. I've attached a screen shot (hopefully it came through) of the message I am still getting when I go to orthodoxchristianity.net. If I type orthodoxchristianity.net/forum into the browser on my Mac I can get to the forum only.
That sounds like a stale DNS cache for me; we have taken countermeasures to maximize DNS propagation times, so I wouldn’t worry about this as its just your device doing a trick which normally speeds things up, except when something is changed and a “cache miss” occurs.  They used to be quite annoying back in the late 1950s where a cache miss could waste hours of precious, astonishingly expensive compute time.  Almost as annoying as dropping your sorted deck of seventy punch cards on the floor and having to resort them...
 

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All good here. Was having a problem a couple months ago where my laptop would crash from something graphics-related every few days, but watching a short youtube vid showed me that flipping one thing in 'advanced options' in chrome would fix it. *shrug*
 

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My computer is running a Dell Windows 10 desktop, with one tb of space. I only use it when I need to do something that I cannot do on my tablet, which is an old Kindle Fire that now doesn't always connect to wi-fi hotspots (technology getting a little out of date; its particularly a problem in hotels). My wife uses the computer more often for her job as a public schoolteacher. As far as the OCNet tech, it seems to be running fine on my tablet, at least.
 

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Asteriktos said:
All good here. Was having a problem a couple months ago where my laptop would crash from something graphics-related every few days, but watching a short youtube vid showed me that flipping one thing in 'advanced options' in chrome would fix it. *shrug*
What OS?
 

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Sethrak said:
Is that a comment or is your computer making that sound?

A rule of thumb is that only servers and high end routers and switches (Ciscos, Junipers, Brocades, and other rackmount gear) have the right to be noisy.  If your desktop suddenly sounds like a turbojet engine, you probably need a new fan.  Exception: Lenovo M series SFF desktops with Core 2 CPUs from 2009-2010 can be amazingly loud.  Too loud, really; they are overrevving their fans and will likely require premature replacement.  I had one and it was rather a disappointment compared both to USFF form factor M series from the same year, which were quiet and well mannered, and older SFF M series like the IBM M41 with a Pentium 4 from around late 2004ish.
 

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Alpha60 said:
Sethrak said:
Is that a comment or is your computer making that sound?

A rule of thumb is that only servers and high end routers and switches (Ciscos, Junipers, Brocades, and other rackmount gear) have the right to be noisy.  If your desktop suddenly sounds like a turbojet engine, you probably need a new fan.  Exception: Lenovo M series SFF desktops with Core 2 CPUs from 2009-2010 can be amazingly loud.  Too loud, really; they are overrevving their fans and will likely require premature replacement.  I had one and it was rather a disappointment compared both to USFF form factor M series from the same year, which were quiet and well mannered, and older SFF M series like the IBM M41 with a Pentium 4 from around late 2004ish.
You certainly know your stuff, and I mean that.
 

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Diego said:
Alpha60 said:
Sethrak said:
Is that a comment or is your computer making that sound?

A rule of thumb is that only servers and high end routers and switches (Ciscos, Junipers, Brocades, and other rackmount gear) have the right to be noisy.  If your desktop suddenly sounds like a turbojet engine, you probably need a new fan.  Exception: Lenovo M series SFF desktops with Core 2 CPUs from 2009-2010 can be amazingly loud.  Too loud, really; they are overrevving their fans and will likely require premature replacement.  I had one and it was rather a disappointment compared both to USFF form factor M series from the same year, which were quiet and well mannered, and older SFF M series like the IBM M41 with a Pentium 4 from around late 2004ish.
You certainly know your stuff, and I mean that.
I appreciate that.  :)
 

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Agabus said:
FormerReformer said:
In regards to the forum or in general?! IS THERE SOMETHING ON THE OCNET END I SHOULD KNOW?!!!!

;D

For the most part, my gear is fine. Though at this point, I think HP should just pack it in and tell everyone to run Linux on their rigs. Out of all the PCs I've had and: the two I currently have and the one relative who always asks you for IT help has, only HP computers are this finicky with Windows 10. Everytime I update some crazy esoteric thing (registry, power modes, etc) after any W10 update all the HP computers decide they have been specifically designed for Amish communities. I don't have this problem with any other PC, just Hewlett Packard. Seriously, my dual boot Mac plays nicer with Windows 10 than the HP computers that have, in theory, been designed for it.
No kidding. I bought a cheap HP notebook for writing papers and occasional work notes in February, and I used it exactly three times before an update corrupted the mousepad driver.

I was able to fix it with a driver from freakin' 2006, but I was really amazed at how quickly my skepticism about buying the HP had proved true.
By the way, I will say that historically, after the Compaq merger, and indeed before it, most of HP’s consumer (rather than enterprise) offerings were miserable; I never saw a Pavillion desktop that I liked.  It was so bad once I had a nightmare in which I had an HP laptop instead of a ThinkPad.  The only consumer OEM that used to annoy me more was Sony VAIO; HP to their credit was not preloading spyware.
 

Eamonomae

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Yes. Out of the Laptops I've had that were HP, only one (the first one when I was younger) was really flawless - the other 4 were garbage that broke. One overheated till BSOD, one's screen broke easily, one's charging input wouldn't charge, and one's hard drive died. I'm on HP now, which replaced the last one for free, and a couple days ago I've started noticing sporadic crashes.

It's garbage, but hey - Employee discounts and university aid.

I hope to get a new one soon, and I hope that I don't get stuck with an HP.
 

Alpha60

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Eamonomae said:
Yes. Out of the Laptops I've had that were HP, only one (the first one when I was younger) was really flawless - the other 4 were garbage that broke. One overheated till BSOD, one's screen broke easily, one's charging input wouldn't charge, and one's hard drive died. I'm on HP now, which replaced the last one for free, and a couple days ago I've started noticing sporadic crashes.

It's garbage, but hey - Employee discounts and university aid.

I hope to get a new one soon, and I hope that I don't get stuck with an HP.
Lenovo has been doing an overpriced limited edition with their classic seven row keyboard installed, but frankly I would rather buy an X or T series from a few years ago that shipped with that keyboard, because ThinkPads last forever.  And if you are using them for Linux/UNIX programming and network engineering stuff, you really don’t need a lot of power, at all (for example, if you needed to access a resource hungry modern browser, you could connect to a Windows server or laptop/desktop running the Professional or Enterprise edition with rdesktop, the Linux client for Remote Desktop, or with even greater elegance, ssh into a Linux or UNIX server with Firefox, Chrome, Opera or other browsers installed using ssh -X, which forwards standard UNIX GUI apps like a web browser over a secure link, so they appear to be running on your local computer, but all your computer is doing is drawing the pixels on the screen; the heavy HTML5/Javascript/AJAX client side scripting that powers a lot of modern websites is happening on the server.  And the server doesn’t even need a monitor, keyboard or GPU (but GPUs in servers are a thing now, given that they have proven themselves useful for doing a vast range of computations not relating to video games or computer graphics, with much greater performance than a CPU, for example, cryptocurrency mining).
 

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RaphaCam said:
It's a Dell Inspiron i3668 desktop, I believe. It's very slow to turn on for some reason, but otherwise pretty good.
What OS?

Some servers and professional workstations take a very long time to boot up because they do elaborate power on self test functions before loading the OS.  The rationale is that on a machine intended to have an uptime measured potentially in years, fast boot times are pointless.  For example, a Sun Microsystems or Oracle X series server with Intel or AMD CPUs, when you first plug it in, does a POST on ilom, the Integrated Lights Out Management system, which is a separate onboard management computer running a MIPS CPU and which provides a command line (via serial cable, telnet or ssh), and a web interface, that lets you access the console of the server and turn it on, off, or reboot it remotely, and you can also view system health information, system temperature, fan status, warnings, for example, if a power supply or fan or hard disk (all of which are hot-swappable, meaning we can change them out while the system is fully booted) is going bad.  And this sytem has to POST (Power On Self Test) before the server proper can be booted.

Then you turn on the server and depending on the model get UEFI with a Phoenix BIOS wrapper or AMBIOS, and if you have newer Intel CPUs they have their own integrated management engines (vPro) running Minix (a tiny OS which Linus Torvalds used but found too slow and limited, prompting him to write Linux, and causing the famous flamewar with him and Professor Andrew Tannenbaum who wrote Minix at the time as a teaching tool, for teaching OS development to CS students; since that time Tannenbaum rewrote Minix to make it a serious operating system, released it under an open source license, and it performs amazingly well and can run most Linux and UNIX software; and amusingly enough, because unlike most operating systems it is extremely modular, Intel was able to use it to engineer a tiny OS image for their Integrated Management Engine, and because this ships on all recent Intel CPUs, there are probably more MINIX systems in use than Linux systems, although most people aren’t even aware of their existence).  The IME on the Intel CPU partially overlaps with the ILOM in terms of functionality.  So all of that has to boot up.

And the memory will also test itself; it is registered ECC RAM and is installed in pairs, to prevent errors of memory corruption.  This is actually a big deal; RAM fails a lot, and consumer machines with normal RAM and no ECC are vulnerable to “bit flips” where something as random as a gamma ray from outer space or a solar flare will cause one bit of your memory to change from a 0 to 1, and this can cause anything from causing you to go to the wrong website (Google bitsquatting) to crashing the OS.

Then the storage controllers, or HBAs as we call them, which range from basic hardware RAID to high end SAS or Fibre Channel storage area network cards have to boot, and they have their own OS and their own BIOS like utility which lets you control your storage configuration.  And then finally once all that happens, the system can load the operating system, which can be quite slow in the case of Windows Server or some Linux distributions, to incredibly fast in the case of some lightweight OSes like NetBSD.

You can tell where you are in the boot process by the sound of the fans; when you plug the server in, it roars like a rocket while ILOM boots up; then once ilom is on, until you actually turn the server on either by pressing a button or connecting remotely via the network or serial cable, the fans idle and the system does not make much noise.  Then, when you do turn it on and start the process of booting up the CPUs, the memory, the HBAs and so on, the system becomes extremely noisy once more, until the OS is loaded.  Then normally they are loud but not as insanely loud as during the boot sequence.

This applies generally to enterprise-grade Intel and AMD servers from most vendors, including more common brands like Dell or Supermicro (which dominate in the web hosting market) or IBM/Lenovo and HP, which dominate the corporate market together with Dell, with Oracle, Cisco’s UCS servers, and a few other smaller brands owned by larger companies that make most of their money from other things on the outside.  Which in the case of Sun was a real tragedy, because their hardware was so beautiful and exquisitely engineered.  The best servers Ive ever worked with were Sun servers (both SPARC and Intel/AMD), with IBM being in second place (and Lenovo bought most of that).
 

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I believe it's Windows 8. I don't really know anything about computers or technology in general apart from what I had to learn to contribute to Wikipedia (which includes basic HTML and Lua, and advanced Wikitext).
 

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ALPHA60, you and I have clashed a lot in the past. But that's in the past. I have to admit, you really know your stuff! I mean, I can get around a computer or tablet ok, but you are really sharp. I like you, in spite of our past disagreements.
 

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RaphaCam said:
I believe it's Windows 8. I don't really know anything about computers or technology in general apart from what I had to learn to contribute to Wikipedia (which includes basic HTML and Lua, and advanced Wikitext).
I'm similar haha, I wish there was a general purpose coding language that was highly similar to wikitext. I tried python once but I just got so lazy and distracted.
 
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