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How do the Orthodox Fast during Lent

bwallace23350

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So Lent starts for us Western Christians today. I fast typically. I work a physical job and have my produce garden up and running during this time so I don't do a sun up to sun down fast as our priest talks about on Ash Wednesday and Good Friday. I eat bland food instead and limit my food intake. I cut out candy and cookies and such. But what do the Orthodox of all stripes do?
 

Ainnir

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Are you asking about guidelines or practice?
Also note that the typical response to fasting questions is: Ask your priest. Orthodoxy is a way of life, not a monolith.
 

bwallace23350

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Guidlines or practice. What is typical, what do you do, and just general information
 

LizaSymonenko

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We fast from meat and dairy products. In other words, we go vegan for the duration of Great Lent, with oil permitted on some days. Fish is permitted on Feast Days, (Annunciation, and Palm Sunday)... and the meals are preferrably simple. Nothing elaborate.

However, we focus more on prayer and almsgiving than on the food we eat. Too much emphasis is put on the dietary needs... when our thought processes should instead be focusing more on the spritual than the physical.

We attend more services - starting with the Canon of St. Andrew of Crete on the first week, Presanctified Liturgy every Wednesday evening (and Fridays), Divine Liturgy on Saturdays, Memorial Saturdays, Akathist Saturdays, etc.

Instead of watching movies or videos, we are to read the Holy Scriptures, or material that will edify our soul, and help us in our understanding of Christ, and lead us towards Salvation.

We are also to give alms... not only funds to our parish and Church, but, to do more good to those around us, as we should be doing always... but, we lack incentive.

We are to give up any bad habits (overeating, smoking, drinking, cursing, addictions (drubs, movies, games, etc.)... and refocus on God.

In other words, we are to be the best Christians that we can be.
 
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Sethrak

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I, my daughter reminded me that Great Lent started for us this Monday past (reminded me at lunch Monday)~ will be fasting with just the abstaining from meat and meat products ```
 

Stinky

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We fast from meat and dairy products. In other words, we go vegan for the duration of Great Lent, with oil permitted on some days. Fish is permitted on Feast Days, (Annunciation, and Palm Sunday)... and the meals are preferrably simple. Nothing elaborate.

However, we focus more on prayer and almsgiving than on the food we eat. Too much emphasis is put on the dietary needs... when our thought processes should instead be focusing more on the spritual than the physical.

We attend more services - starting with the Canon of St. Andrew of Crete on the first week, Presanctified Liturgy every Wednesday evening (and Fridays), Divine Liturgy on Saturdays, Memorial Saturdays, Akathist Saturdays, etc.

Instead of watching movies or videos, we are to read the Holy Scriptures, or material that will edify our soul, and help us in our understanding of Christ, and lead us towards Salvation.

We are also to give alms... not only funds to our parish and Church, but, to do more good to those around us, as we should be doing always... but, we lack incentive.

We are to give up any bad habits (overeating, smoking, drinking, cursing, additions (drubs, movies, games, etc.)... and refocus on God.

In other words, we are to be the best Christians that we can be.
Thank you for this!
 

YA2921

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All the other Ethiopian Orthodox Fasts are fasted until 3pm.

In The Ethiopian Orthodox Church the Fast of LENT is more strict and is fasted as so:

1st week till’ 6pm
2nd week till’ 5pm
3rd week till’ 5pm
4th week till’ 5pm
5th week till’ 5pm
6th week till’ 5pm
7th week till’ 5pm
8th week Mon-Thur til 7pm
8th week Friday and Saturday no food
If two days of no food cannot be done then all of Saturday is mandatory.

We fast from all Animal Products, Alcohol and carnal relations, believers however in addition to this add additional restrictions to their fasting such as reducing or eliminating television and reducing talking especially on Friday of the 8th week .


References:
 

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Dominika

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Actually Eastern Orthodox in Middle East also don't eat and drink in the morning, at least until noon, some more. Plus generally it's better, also among Eastern Orthodox, to not eat and drink anything on Great Friday and Great Saturday :)
 

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Concerning the general fasting rules, my parish (New Calendar) put out these guidelines:
"The Church prescribes a common fasting discipline for the faithful during Lent. M-F we abstain from flesh-meats, dairy products, fish, wine and oil. On weekends we are allowed as a relaxation wine and oil. On the Great Feasts of the Annunciation (March 25) and Palm Sunday (April 25), we are allowed fish. During the week we attempt to limit the number of our meals. It is customary for Orthodox to abstain from eating and drinking until noon. When we fast from food we also do from marital relations.
The goal of this fast has little to do with food. The prescribed fast is a means to obtain a little hunger and to produce in us hunger and thirst for the Kingdom of God as well as sympathy for the hungry of the world that would drive us to almsgiving. As well by fasting the Spirit of God tames our unruly desires of the flesh, exposes sin that should be repented of as we recognize our addictions to earthly pleasures and things, frees up time normally taken by food preparation and consumption for spiritual reading, confession, visitation, and other good deeds. We turn our attention away from eating dead things that perish in order to give our attention to eating things which abide forever, such as the Word of God and the Holy Eucharist.
If we have a negative attitude toward fasting we are completely missing the point and wasting our time. Fasting is a joy. We don't have to fast. We get to fast. It was precisely this change of attitude concerning fasting from joy to burden that led to the fall of man. If you don't feel positive ask yourself why you don't and hear your Lord's counsel to anoint your head when you fast. Are there specific things God is calling you to fast from? (TV, cell phone, speaking, sleeping too much, criticizing, unedifying reading, movies, internet, social media, eating out, smoking, computer games, shopping, theatre, coffee, sweets....)
May your fasting be blessed for your salvation!"

In Old Calendar parishes, it is the exact same way, except that the Annunciation falls on April 7, and wine and oil are allowed on March 22 (feast of the Holy Forty Martyrs of Sebaste).
I also know some people who eat nothing on Clean Monday (the first day of Lent).
 
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