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Identifying an Icon

Irish Melkite

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KYIR6539[1].JPG


Any help identifying this icon would be welcome.
It is written or painted (whichever you prefer) on the reverse of an icon on which only the oklad survives - and which contains the text below at the bottom


BLEK1325[1].JPG
 
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brlon

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The inscription at the top left suggests Saint Gregory the Theologian (...igor b[o]goslov); the inscription at the upper right is too obscured to read.
The inscription on the metalwork [Sancta Maria Auxiliatrix Passavienis Miraculis Clara] appears to relate to an image popular in Bavaria and Austria, originally painted (it is believed) by the 16th century artist Lucas Cranach the Elder.
 

Irish Melkite

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Thank you. Your eyesight is obviously better than mine - although, now that you've identified the top left inscription, I suddenly have an 'of course' moment. I am inclined to think that the figure on the right is Saint Nonna, his mother. The only icons of him that I've ever seen that included a single other individual were those with her and one of Saint Gregory's healing of the deposed emperor Constantine.

Thanks also for the information about Cranach's painting. Although I know he did some metalwork and engravature, I've seen nothing to suggest that he did anything that we would consider in the style of an icon or that he is likely to have ever created oklad for any of his works. I did find though that the particular painting you referenced is apparently much copied as to content and style and I'm surmising that an iconographer copied it and subsequently applied oklad (the full obverse is shown below). The image was later removed, for whatever reason.

Many years,

Neil

YFVI4133.JPG
 
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