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if you are orthodox have you visited an eastern Catholic church?

dzheremi

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I visited a Ruthenian Catholic church on the advice of my priest after I tired of the Latins, before I became Orthodox. It was...underwhelming. They said the filioque clause in the Creed even though they technically weren't supposed to, the parishioners obviously could not read their traditional liturgical language even though that's what many of their responses were supposed to be in, the whole thing was over in about 50 minutes, etc. Everybody was nice enough, I just didn't really like it.
 

mike

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I visited one Armenian church of touristic reasons somewhere in Bulgaria (Varna?). Not sure whether it was Catholic or Non-Chalcedonian though.

I also visited one or two Easter (Ukrainian?) churches in Vilinia (built as Orthodox).
 

Mor Ephrem

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It's been a while, but I've visited Ukrainian Catholic and Ruthenian Catholic parishes for Liturgy.  I preferred the music of the latter, but the ritual of the former.  Not great, but not bad either...good, but a bit on the short side.  I think the Ukrainians even had a "Low Mass" once, that was a bit strange.  I went to a Melkite service once, and that was pretty authentic (I had the sense they were trying a bit too much, but that's OK).    

I've had to attend Syro-Malabar Catholic parishes for various sacraments (mostly baptisms and weddings, but one funeral too), some of which included the Liturgy.  It's really a penance for me to attend their services: I know enough about the East Syriac liturgy to know what it's supposed to be versus what they're actually (trying to) do and why they're doing it that way...I don't have enough words to describe how painful it is.  Syro-Malankara Catholic services look downright Athonite compared to Syro-Malabar services (and in general they're not too bad...a bit on the "Orthodox lite" side, but to their credit they retain a few things that we don't do that we ought to do).  
 

biro

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I have not been to one. There is a nice-looking one near me. Maybe one day I'll go, just to see what it's like.
 

dzheremi

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Mor Ephrem said:
I've had to attend Syro-Malabar Catholic parishes for various sacraments (mostly baptisms and weddings, but one funeral too), some of which included the Liturgy.  It's really a penance for me to attend their services: I know enough about the East Syriac liturgy to know what it's supposed to be versus what they're actually (trying to) do and why they're doing it that way...I don't have enough words to describe how painful it is.  
I've noticed this too: The Syro-Malankara Catholic liturgy is much less painful than the Syro-Malabar. I suppose the easy answer is that the Syro-Malankara are recently united with Rome (since 1930) as opposed to the Syro-Malabars' several hundred years worth of union (more time to be Latinized, I suppose), but do you think that's accurate, or is there something more to it? It's weird to me, but I'm not any kind of Syriac person (or Indian), so what do I know.
 

Mor Ephrem

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dzheremi said:
I suppose the easy answer is that the Syro-Malankara are recently united with Rome (since 1930) as opposed to the Syro-Malabars' several hundred years worth of union (more time to be Latinized, I suppose), but do you think that's accurate, or is there something more to it?
I think that's basically it.  Not only is their union less than a hundred years old, but it came at a time when, if I'm not mistaken, Rome was encouraging its Eastern Churches to de-latinise.  There wasn't so much incentive to latinise, and so they kept the Orthodox liturgy for the most part.  There were some Latin influences freely adopted, however: statues, use of unleavened bread in addition to or instead of leavened loaves, the commemoration of the Pope and, in the appropriate place after the commemoration of the three ecumenical councils, a commemoration of the council of Chalcedon by name (though none of the others were named), Rosary and Sacred Heart devotions (among others), etc., but I don't know how common they are now...some certainly remain in vogue, while others may have been replaced with others or simply taken out.  Other latinisations (e.g., mandatory priestly celibacy) don't necessarily have to do with the rite, so there's no need to go into them. 
 

Arachne

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I'd love to visit one, because I'm curious like that, but the nearest parishes are over an hour away by train. That's a bit much for a field trip.
 

Dominika

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Before becoming the member of the Orthodox Church, I visited Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church in Warsaw (Liturgies) several times. Not so bad: traditional galician singing and sometimes a bit of obikhod and even byzantine; 1,5 hours lasting (on Sunday, because on a weekday or a feast on weekday - very short, the majority is read and not sung etc.); of course some latinisations. The problem is for their liturgical life that they have only Liturgy, and normal Liturgy is only on Sunday and some of the 12 great feasts, although it's a kind of monastery (!). Ah, and one time (!) in the Great Lent they serve the Great Canon. And the plus is that they have normal Nativity services at night - only one Orthodox parish in Warsaw (from 7 or something like that) does it, and only according to the old calendar. These Ukrainians have old calendar, and their church is strictly restricted to Ukrainians and Lemkos. The services are in Ukrainian, with small parts in Church Slavonic.

Once I've visited a Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church in Vilnus, but haven't attended any service.

I've also attended Armenian Catholic Liturgy, even with a bishop. Not so bad, but the Orthodox one was much better (longer, better chanting, more people, and above all, there was a feeling it is Orthodox, I have this feeling of latinism, not truly Orthodox faith even if the Eastern Catholic services are pretty the same as ours)

The reasons where just my liturgical curiosity, as I'm very interesting in liturgical topics, and also, to attend Orthodox-like services with the possiblity of Communion, which now I consider stupid, as I think they have a Communion, but there is lack of the whole Christ, of the unity with the true Church - it's difficult to describe it
 
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