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Is it OK for Orthodox Christians to celebrate Halloween?

Is it OK for Orthodox Christians to celebrate Halloween?

  • Yes

    Votes: 86 37.2%
  • No

    Votes: 95 41.1%
  • Maybe

    Votes: 18 7.8%
  • Unsure

    Votes: 22 9.5%
  • Other (Explain)

    Votes: 10 4.3%

  • Total voters
    231

Jetavan

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GabrieltheCelt said:
Here's what I get to put up with everynight until November!  My neighbor has turned his front yard into a cemetery.  One more reason I can't stand this satanic 'celebration'...
Looks like another day at the office. ;D
 

Myrrh23

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Gabriel, that is so cool!! :eek:
Man, if I were younger, I'd so trick-or-treat at that house! You're so lucky to live there......I'm jealous. :(
 

Aristocles

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I know I voted "no" in this poll a long time ago, but made no explanation via a post (I think - too lazy to read 9 pages of posts at 45 each).
We've a QA/QC saying at work on the production line, "When in doubt, throw it out". Applying a version of that to the question here..."When in doubt, leave it out".
 

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My parents never allowed us children to participate in any way with Halloween. It was hard on me as a child to feel  left out of the dressing up and trick-or-treating antics, but now as an adult, I am totally oblivious to this holiday. It's a total non-event and irrelevant to me. I'm hardly aware of its existence. The whole thing seems bizarre.
 

GreekChef

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Halloween has always been a hard thing in my house, because my birthday is on the 28th (yes, OXI day).  I was almost a halloween baby, so I've always celebrated my birthday as everyone was gearing up for halloween.  I think my parents did a good job of balancing things out-- she let me have parties with pumpkin plates and napkins, stuff like that.  And my sister and I did go trick-or-treating, because my parents didn't want us to feel left out.  But we were never allowed to have scary costumes.  We were things like princesses and pumpkins, and, my personal favorite, a bag of M&M's.  :)

I just have to relay a little story that happened at halloween two years ago... my husband and I and a dear friend of ours were in a party store just before halloween.  We were just wandering around waiting for the restaurant next door to seat us (there was a 45 minute wait to be seated that night).  We wandered through the costume section just as a woman and her two kids walked up to the giant wall where the costumes were hanging.  There were pictures of each costume on a model, and the costumes themselves came in packages.  The little boy was probably five and the little girl about seven.  The girl picked out a snow white costume and the boy a costume of a soldier in fatigues (no gun).  The mother OBJECTED to their picks.  She gave the little boy a costume of the devil.  Now this wasn't just any costume.  It was probably the scariest one I've ever seen.  It was truly demonic--- wrinkled, scary mask with the curled horns, etc.  And she gave the girl a PROSTITUTE costume!  Fishnet stockings, hot pink "leather" mini skirt, tube top, etc.  I was appalled.  I was even more appalled because the kids obviously didn't want them.  They both immediately threw temper tantrums.  But she yelled at them both and forced them to take them, saying that if they didn't wear those, they wouldn't wear costumes at all!  My husband and Dimitri and I were standing open-mouthed watching the whole thing, our eyes as big as dinner plates.  I couldn't believe what I was seeing.  Personally, I was horrified that the store would even sell those costumes in little kid sizes, but then this display was awful!!!  I wanted to say something so badly, and I wanted to hug those little kids, and I wanted to slap the mother (God forgive me).  The whole thing made quite an impression on me, which is why I remember it to this day.  It was the perfect example of "what are we teaching our children!!??!!"

I don't have any problem, personally, with a halloween alternative for kids, such as a fall festival at Church.  This way the kids aren't left out of the festivities (you have to admit that it IS fun to play dress up!), but the emphasis is on good fun, fellowship, community, love, Christ.  No scary costumes, no ghost stories... At retreats I've done, we tell saint stories instead.  Their much more captivating for the kids, I find, because they're true!  And what better way to emphasize Christ and His love than telling stories of miraculous saints!?!
 

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That's a very sobering story you shared with us, Presbytera! So very sad when adults intentionally mar those precious, fleeting years of childhood innocence and purity in such a manner.  I'm thankful my parents protected me as well as they did from such vulgarity and evil. Lord have mercy on us all!

Recently, a friend of mine was telling us how at her parish the priest holds a moleben to St. John of Kronstadt in the evening and afterwards the children receive lots of candy. This way they are occupied by a prayer service and can "brag" to their peers at school the next day about all the candy they received! I thought it was a wonderful, and very godly, alternative.
 

Myrrh23

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GreekChef, I WOULD have said something, as big-mouthed as I am! ;)
I probably would have even said to the mother that if she was going to make her kid dress up as a prostitute, I'd report her to child services, even if the store IS selling it! :mad:
 

Jibrail Almuhajir

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Myrrh23 said:
Gabriel, that is so cool!! :eek:
Man, if I were younger, I'd so trick-or-treat at that house! You're so lucky to live there......I'm jealous. :(
Ummmm, I was kinda goin' for the opposite reaction. :-\  I think we've become sooo desensitized that we tend not to think twice when someone turns their front yard into a graveyard.  Beyond bizarre.  Like smoking. :)
 

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I agree about the desensitization part, Gabriel.  I spent several years in Eastern Europe, where people simply do not celebrate Halloween (what a relief!). How well I remember my first Halloween back here in North America! :eek: I was calmly walking down the street when suddenly, before my very eyes, in someone's front yard was a "man" with only the lower half of his body (waist down) above ground-legs skyward! I was literally terrified, thinking it was a real person in this distressing situation. All around him were "tombstones". It all seemed in very bad taste, and this was amplified by not having been exposed to such terrors for several years.
 

Papist

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ozgeorge said:
I think it's just cultural.
Don't we Orthodox do even stranger things than go around in fancy dress asking for candy?
Behind our Altars is the life-sized image of the Corpse of a Man Who was tortured to death by being nailed to a Cross. We eat His Flesh and drink His Blood. On Holy Friday night, we carry His symbolic Tomb in procession and venerate it. I was in Crete for Pascha in the late eighties, and they celebrate the Resurrection by hanging an effigy of Judas from a gallows and burning it with a bonfire at Midnight.
Being a Christian is so much fun.
 

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ytterbiumanalyst said:
Keble said:
Mari, that story is simply appalling. I cannot fathom why a mother would choose to override the choice of innocuous costumes.

And GIC, what can I say? Every day I drive my daughter to school, and I see a bunch of pre- to barely-pubescent wearing clothing that says, "I am a sexual object." (The preferred boys' statement, by contrast, is "I am a slob.") Kids that age need a childhood.
I agree completely.
I agree completely.

Lord help us.
 

Pravoslavbob

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For the discussion on prostitution, please go to this thread.

Pravoslavbob
 

welkodox

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People do stupid stuff and have their kids exposed to inappropriate things 365 days a year.

I love watching Charlie Brown and taking my kids trick or treating.  So I will be celebrating.
 

DanM

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Thomas said:
As northern Europe and the British Isles became Christianized, the Church saw that the pagan
festivals still lured Christians to compromise their faith. One such was the Druidic New Year that
began on November 1. In the strictly Orthodox early Celtic Church, the Holy Fathers tried to
counteract this pagan new year festival by establishing the feast of All Saints on that same day (in
the East, this feast is celebrated on the Sunday after Pentecost).
I am pretty sure that the Pope Gregory III would have cared--if he had known--about what the Picts in the sticks were doing, but I can only claim absence of evidence.  Can you cite chapter and verse for the Christianization of Samhein?
Thanks, DanM
 

Chacci

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Myrrh23 said:
So what's everyone doing for Halloween this year? Wanna do something? :)
This year, my family will go trick or treating on Friday - my kids are dressing up as Dorothy Gail(?), a Scarecrow, A SWAT team guy, and a Chile pepper.  Then on Saturday, after Vespers, we are celebrating a semi-traditional dia de los muertos, replete with marigolds, an altar with pictures of our loved ones, some tequila and posole.  We have invited our Priest with the rest of our Church to come over do a Trisagion to remember our loved ones.  As is traditional, those coming over will bring their loved ones favorite dish to share.

Your welcome to join us...

Chacci
 

Ebor

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Chacci said:
Myrrh23 said:
So what's everyone doing for Halloween this year? Wanna do something? :)
This year, my family will go trick or treating on Friday - my kids are dressing up as Dorothy Gail(?), a Scarecrow, A SWAT team guy, and a Chile pepper. 
Those are some great costumes!  Re: the chili pepper, the second year our oldest went trick or treating (and the first time he decided on his own costume) he was an ear of corn.  That was an interesting bit of construction with a front of little yellow 'pillows' and a kind of cape that also was on his head in green that had a tuft of raffia as the silk.  Someone thought he was an alligator.  :D

I think Youngest will be a dinosaur again, while the oldest now 15 is 'too mature' to dress up, though he might take his brother (who doesn't like much candy but does like to visit and ring door bells) to a few houses in the neighborhood.  Our daughter is coming up with her own costume this year and at one point was going to be a sushi-roll (!).  Now I don't know what she has in mind.

On the pumpkin front, last year the teen carved the "Eye of Sauron" on his.  He's pondering what to do this year, but I think the Stargate is out because it could fall out if the base isn't big enough.  ;D

 

thetraditionalfrog

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For myself, not having any children it is a non issue. I'm going to join my parents for dinner then visit with them for the remainder evening.

Rather than "trick or treat", I much prefer the phrase from Scotland "The sky is blue, the grass is green, let us have our Halloween"!
 

Aristocles

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One of the best pieces on this issue I've read:
"Halloween Orthodoxy and Secular Culture"
By Fr. John Moses
Nov 1, 2008, 10:00

http://www.pravmir.com/article_408.html
 

DanM

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Αριστοκλής said:
One of the best pieces on this issue I've read:
"Halloween Orthodoxy and Secular Culture"
By Fr. John Moses
Nov 1, 2008, 10:00
http://www.pravmir.com/article_408.html
I am not competent to address the spiritual issues raised in this article, but the parts of the article claiming to give the history of Halloween are just plain silly.
Please note that I do not label my statements rebuttals but counter-claims.  A rebuttal would require source citation, which I cannot afford to do, since I live a long ways from a proper library.

Claim 1.  "The feast of Halloween began among the Celtic peoples of Britain, Ireland, and northern France."
Counter-claim 1.  The feast of Halloween takes its origins from the dedication of a chapel in St. Peter's which was specially dedicated to ALL SAINTS.  The dedication date of that chapel was 1 November (8th century, year unknown).  Pope Gregory transferred the older feast of all martyrs from 13 May 609/610, which had been established by the dedication of the Pantheon by Pope Boniface IV.  It boggles my mind that Pope Gregory would have known or cared that 1 November was Samhein among the Picts in the sticks. 

Claim 2.  "These pagan peoples believed that physical life was born from death."
Counter-claim 2.  Maybe they did, but the Druids never wrote down what they believed, so we are not free to speculate.

Claim 3.  Therefore, they celebrated the beginning of the "new year" in the fall (on the eve of October 31 and into the day of November 1), when they believed, the season of cold, darkness, decay and death began.
Counter-claim 3.  Most people in the northern hemisphere do believe that cold, darkness, decay and death begin in the fall.  It's the time when things die.

Claim 4.  The Celts believed that a certain deity, whom they called Samhain, was the Lord of Death. To him they gave honor at their New Year's festival.
Counter-claim 4.  This is sheer nonsense.  Scholars are not in agreement with what Samhein means--beyond the reference to a minor hero whose magical cow was stolen--but there is no Lord of the Dead if you look for him beyond Chick publications or Internet resources.

Claim 5.  Many beliefs and practices were associated with this feast, which have endured to this current time.
Counter-claim 5.  The efforts of people to debunk Halloween and Christmas by connecting them with ancient pagan practices does not merely race ahead of the evidence, but soars into the the farthest reaches of Internet legend.  It takes a great deal of painstaking research to connect even fairly recent customs; the facile assumption that we are doing something just so because the Druids did it one, two or three thousand years ago is arrogant.

Claim 6.  On the eve of the New Year's festival, the Druids, who were the priests of the Celtic cult, instructed their people to extinguish all hearth fires and lights. On the evening of the festival they ignited a huge bonfire built from oak branches, which they believed to be sacred.
Non-rebuttal 6.  No idea.  This could be.

Claim 7.  Upon this fire, they offered burnt sacrifices of crops, animals,
Counter-claim 7.  Animals were in fact slaughtered and feasted on, if they were judged to be unable to survive the winter on meager rations.

Claim 8.  and even human beings
Rebuttal 8.  The Druids seem to have performed human sacrifice, if Caesar is to be believed (although he also reported that elk had no joints in their legs, so that the hunter need only saw most of the way through a tree against which his prey was known to sleep standing up; it was a matter of time before the tree fell down and the poor beast, like an unhorsed knight, could not get up and run away), but no evidence gathered by someone hardy enough to gather information beyond the confines of the Internet supports the contention that human sacrifice was specially done on Halloween.

Claim 9.  to appease and cajole Samhain, the lord of Death. They also believed that Samhain, being pleased by their faithful offerings, allowed the souls of the dead to return to homes for a festal visit on this day.
Counter-claim 9.  This is sheer stuff and nonsense. 

Claim 10.  This belief led to the ritual practice of wandering about in the dark dressed in costumes indicating ghosts, witches, hobgoblins, fairies and demons.
Counter-claim 10.  This is folk-etiology.

Claim 11.  The living entered into fellowship and communion with their dead by this ritual act of imitation, through costume and the wandering about in the darkness, even as the souls of the dead were believed to wander.
Counter-claim 11.  More folk-etiology.

Claim 12.  The dialogue of "trick or treat" is integral to Halloween beliefs and practices. The souls of the dead had--by Celtic tradition--entered into the world of darkness, decay, and death. They bore the affliction of great hunger on their festal visit. This belief brought about the practice of begging as another Celtic ritual imitation of the dead. The implication was that any souls of the dead and their imitators who are not appeased with "treats", i.e. offerings, will provoke the wrath of Samhain, whose angels and servants (the souls and human imitators) could retaliate through a system of "tricks" or curses. One radio commentator takes great fun in calling Halloween, "Begoween."
Rebuttal 12.  Loads more folk-etiology.

Claim 13.  The sacred fire was the fire of the New Year was taken home to rekindle lights and hearth fires.
Counter-claim 13.  This sounds more like the ROman custom.

Claim 14.  This developed into the practice of the Jack O Lantern (in the U.S.A.; a pumpkin, in older days other vegetables were used), which was carved in imitation of the dead and used to convey the new light and fire to the home, where the lantern was left burning throughout the night.
Counter-claim 14.  Even more folk-etiology.

Claim 15.  Divination was also part of this ancient Celtic festival. After the fire had died out the Druids examined the remains of the main sacrifices, hoping to foretell the coming year's events.
Counter-claim 15.  Divination was important in pagan society.  I would not be surprised if the Irish used Samhein the way that the English used Christmas--to tell the future.

Claim 16.  The Halloween festival was the proper night for sorcery, fortune telling, divination, games of chance, and Satan worship and witchcraft in the later Middle Ages.
Counter-claim 16.  Not that I can tell.

Let me sum things up. 
It is fun and easy to demonize things; it is very hard to do the kind of research necessary to support extravagant theses.  Most opponents of Halloween simply cite Internet sources; they do not go to a nice research library and do the incredibly hard work of finding evidence that is generally acceptable and piecing it together convincingly.  I have never known any opponent of Halloween refer to the standard sources of history, archeology or linguistics.  Nor will I ever, since the instant such an opponent turns to the cold, indifferent facts of history for support, he will be thrust back like a rejected suitor.  The assumption seems to be that by being on the side of the angels, one need not play by the rules.  I do not accept this.  If I am on the side of the angels, playing by the rules is all that matters; my shoddy scholarship or appeal to ignorance will discredit the angels if I do not play by the rules. 
DanM

 

Ebor

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DanM said:
Αριστοκλής said:
One of the best pieces on this issue I've read:
"Halloween Orthodoxy and Secular Culture"
By Fr. John Moses
Nov 1, 2008, 10:00
http://www.pravmir.com/article_408.html
Claim 2.  "These pagan peoples believed that physical life was born from death."
Counter-claim 2.  Maybe they did, but the Druids never wrote down what they believed, so we are not free to speculate.
You are correct, DanM, we do not have solid information on what druids and other non-Christian peoples of Ireland and the British isles believed.  For a scholarly look at this there is Ronald Hutton's book The Pagan Religions of the Ancient British Isles

Claim 4.  The Celts believed that a certain deity, whom they called Samhain, was the Lord of Death. To him they gave honor at their New Year's festival.
Counter-claim 4.  This is sheer nonsense.  Scholars are not in agreement with what Samhein means--beyond the reference to a minor hero whose magical cow was stolen--but there is no Lord of the Dead if you look for him beyond Chick publications or Internet resources.
Quite so. There is no such a being/deity as "Samhain"/"Sowin" or however else it may be spelled. The word has a meaning along the lines of "summer's end" and varients of it mean "November" in Irish and Scots Gaelic.

http://www.savegaelic.org/gaelic/basic-scottish-gaelic.php
http://www.irish-sayings.com/cats/days/months/

Claim 5.  Many beliefs and practices were associated with this feast, which have endured to this current time.
Counter-claim 5.  The efforts of people to debunk Halloween and Christmas by connecting them with ancient pagan practices does not merely race ahead of the evidence, but soars into the the farthest reaches of Internet legend.  It takes a great deal of painstaking research to connect even fairly recent customs; the facile assumption that we are doing something just so because the Druids did it one, two or three thousand years ago is arrogant.
I have a post earlier in this thread that notes that some "practices" are only from the 1930's

Claim 6.  On the eve of the New Year's festival, the Druids, who were the priests of the Celtic cult, instructed their people to extinguish all hearth fires and lights. On the evening of the festival they ignited a huge bonfire built from oak branches, which they believed to be sacred.
Non-rebuttal 6.  No idea.  This could be.
The dousing of all fires and the kindling of one by "druids" occurs in the Spring, not the Fall.  This was the case when St. Patrick kindled the Easter fire which can be read in the Life of St. Patrick, section XL: 
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/18482/18482-8.txt

Claim 7.  Upon this fire, they offered burnt sacrifices of crops, animals,
Counter-claim 7.  Animals were in fact slaughtered and feasted on, if they were judged to be unable to survive the winter on meager rations.
Indeed, it's common in agricultural societies to slaughter some animals and salt/smoke/dry the meat to feed the people as well.  Nothing 'spooky' or satanic about that at all.

Claim 8.  and even human beings
Rebuttal 8.  The Druids seem to have performed human sacrifice, if Caesar is to be believed (although he also reported that elk had no joints in their legs, so that the hunter need only saw most of the way through a tree against which his prey was known to sleep standing up; it was a matter of time before the tree fell down and the poor beast, like an unhorsed knight, could not get up and run away), but no evidence gathered by someone hardy enough to gather information beyond the confines of the Internet supports the contention that human sacrifice was specially done on Halloween.
Caesar and the Romans were, shall we say, not unbiased in how they would depict 'enemies'.  And again, we don't know what they did from their own words (Hutton)

Claim 9.  to appease and cajole Samhain, the lord of Death. They also believed that Samhain, being pleased by their faithful offerings, allowed the souls of the dead to return to homes for a festal visit on this day.
Counter-claim 9.  This is sheer stuff and nonsense. 
No such "god" and it occurs to me that there are similar feelings and beliefs about one's passed away loved ones in the Día de los Muertos celebrations in Mexico or the O-Bon in Japan and such days in other cultures.

Claim 13.  The sacred fire was the fire of the New Year was taken home to rekindle lights and hearth fires.
Counter-claim 13.  This sounds more like the ROman custom.
Spring time, see above and St. Patrick.

That's all I have time for, but DanM is correct.

Ebor
 

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I'm surprised that Fr John Moses would repeat such twaddle. Clearly he lacks any scholarship in Celtic history and has fallen for fanciful reconstruction. I suppose these lies are titilating and much more fun than what we know of the truth, and no doubt the early Christians were bursting their sides laughing at the accusation that they were baby-murderers. Of course, modern Greeks I have spoken to do get somewhat irked that modern "history" suggests that the males of ancient Greece had wives to reproduce but preferred sexual intimacy with their own sex. Which, of course, is as much twaddle as Fr John's essay.

We are Christians; we should abhor lies and overturn them wherever we find them. Falsehood, isn't an innocent source for sport, even if such merely affects the long dead. Thank goodness there are those who still have the moral fortitude to defend a people long gone from the slander of this modern age. I thank both Dan and Ebor on behalf of my Celtic ancestors. 
 

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Αριστοκλής said:
Guess you guys and gals don't like the piece, huh?  ;)
Personally, my Celtic ancestors don't let me get any sleep. They are real sticklers for the Toulmin argument model.
 

minasoliman

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Yes, please someone write a full rebuttal of these ridiculous claims.

But even if true, it has no relevance to todays culture.  For example, it seems that Christmas trees also had a dark past apparently (according to Wikipedia though, so I don't know).  Apparently, trees were used as a sacrifice shrine for the gods, where every ninth year, males of all species including men would be sacrificed.  When a Swedish Christian king refused to take part, after being deposed, he was happy to be among suffering in Christ's name.

Later St. Boniface dubbed the Christmas tree, which is in use till today.

And how relevant is this with today's culture?  Nothing but an extra piece of knowledge.  Just as no one today tricks and treats for the sake of Samhein, no one uses the trees we have as sacrifices.

Just one of the many reasons why we as Christians are laughed at as ignorant, not as the intellectual, practical, and understanding people of the past.
 

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minasoliman said:
Yes, please someone write a full rebuttal of these ridiculous claims.

But even if true, it has no relevance to todays culture.  For example, it seems that Christmas trees also had a dark past apparently (according to Wikipedia though, so I don't know).  Apparently, trees were used as a sacrifice shrine for the gods, where every ninth year, males of all species including men would be sacrificed.  When a Swedish Christian king refused to take part, after being deposed, he was happy to be among suffering in Christ's name.

Later St. Boniface dubbed the Christmas tree, which is in use till today.

And how relevant is this with today's culture?  Nothing but an extra piece of knowledge.  Just as no one today tricks and treats for the sake of Samhein, no one uses the trees we have as sacrifices.

Just one of the many reasons why we as Christians are laughed at as ignorant, not as the intellectual, practical, and understanding people of the past.
^Excellent post. But I, for one, am simply fed up of repeatedly refuting stupid claims by willfully stupid people. As the axiom goes; "one can take a horse to water, but one can't make it drink". This nonsense about connections to pagan rituals (true or false) is simply the replaying of the guilt by association nonsense. It's fear mongering and I'm surprised by how many Christians fall for it. It's simple enough to check such claims before one repeats them as if it is the gospel truth, but it's almost as if such people rejoice in ignorance.

Anyway, I hope everyone who celebrates had a HAPPY HALLOWEEN!
 

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DIXIT  Yes, please someone write a full rebuttal of these ridiculous claims.
DICO  Not necessary.  How often do you accept an article in a journal at face value which demonizes without sources?  The difficulty of Halloween controversies is that demonization and poverty of citation are acceptable.  Even with the most carefully pieced together theses one often has to succumb to skepticism.

DIXIT  But even if true, it has no relevance to todays culture. 
DICO  This I believe was the reason St. Augustine claimed one had to tolerate the continuing celebration of the Lupercalia.

DIXIT  For example, it seems that Christmas trees also had a dark past apparently (according to Wikipedia though, so I don't know). 
DICO  Nego.  To the best of my knowledge, Christmas trees have never been more than stage-props for the re-enactment of the expulsion of Adam and Eve, which in the West was celebrated on December 24.  The earliest references to them are terribly late--I want to say 16th cent.  This is not to say that trees have been unimportant in pagan Europe.  Nor is this to deny that certain customs appear to descend from a benighted--or beforested--era.  It can also work the other way round:  I have heard that certain "witches" had "spells" which were really medieval blessings for various occasions (in Latin).

DIXIT  Just one of the many reasons why we as Christians are laughed at as ignorant, not as the intellectual, practical, and understanding people of the past.
DICO  If we can approach our flashes in the pan with the same erudition and consideration as our Fathers have always done, we would have nothing to be ashamed of.
DanM
 

ozgeorge

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Riddikulus said:
It's simple enough to check such claims before one repeats them as if it is the gospel truth, but it's almost as if such people rejoice in ignorance.
I think a major contributing factor is the "speed of information" these days, which is really the "speed of rumour". The internet is a great tool, but it's also a soapbox which amplifies the voice of every crack-pot, and will be of little use if we don't upload much more of the historical knowledge we have accrued through the ages (much like how ancient knowledge was kept alive in the Scriptoria of Western monasteries during the Dark Ages). At the moment, the internet is, for the most part a collection of editorials and "infotainment". Robert Wilensky once said "We've all heard that a million monkeys banging on a million typewriters will eventually reproduce the entire works of Shakespeare. Now, thanks to the Internet, we know this is not true."
 

Riddikulus

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ozgeorge said:
Robert Wilensky once said "We've all heard that a million monkeys banging on a million typewriters will eventually reproduce the entire works of Shakespeare. Now, thanks to the Internet, we know this is not true."
:laugh:
 

ytterbiumanalyst

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ozgeorge said:
Robert Wilensky once said "We've all heard that a million monkeys banging on a million typewriters will eventually reproduce the entire works of Shakespeare. Now, thanks to the Internet, we know this is not true."
I love it!  :laugh:
 

Ebor

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Αριστοκλής said:
Guess you guys and gals don't like the piece, huh?  ;)
???  I'm a bit puzzled.  There are factual and historic errors in the piece.  Like or dislike may not apply at all when giving correct information.  May one ask why you thought it was such "one of the best pieces" please?

Ebor
 

Gebre Menfes Kidus

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Personally, I always disagreed with the idea of Christians keeping their doors closed on Halloween or segregating themselves from the world in order to have "Fall Festival" parties at their Churches on the same night. The way I see it, there is one day out of the year when strangers actually come to our houses and ask us for something. What a great opportunity that is for us to shine the Light of of Christ by:

1. Giving generously (even handing out candy or preferably healthy goodies is an act of generosity and kindness.)

2. Showing hospitality and demonstrating friendliness to our neighbors.

3. Handing out information about our Faith and inviting people to our Churches.

    For the past few Halloweens, our family has given out candy and treats along with small tracts I had printed with some Christian quotations from the great Emperor Haile Selassie. This year I might have some tracts printed up with an icon and the story of my Patron Saint. I just do these in black and white, and get them made at the local Kinkos. It's not expensive at all.

Anyway, I think Halloween affords us an opportunity to engage the world without being of the world. My children always enjoy giving out candy and tracts to the neighbors, and they never feel disadvantaged because they can't "trick or treat." We make some popcorn, watch some wholesome movies, and look forward to people coming to our door.

OK, that's my two cents on how to do things. :)

Selam
 

Asteriktos

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;D  Hey, it's not my fault, I was forced into doing it. I was minding my own business on the "Who's Online" part of the forum, and saw a Guest/bot/whatever viewing this thread, and suddenly felt compelled--as though through some evil sorcery--to resurrect the thread.
 
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