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Liturgical Innovations in Maronite and Assyrian Mass?

xOrthodox4Christx

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I saw the priest doing the Mass facing the people, using leavened bread and giving communion in the hand. Are these Novus Ordo interpolations and innovations into the Eastern Rite?
 

wgw

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After Vatican II the Maronites went from a liturgy that was Romanized beyond belief, to what you would get if you took the West Syriac rite and ruined it.

The liturgy of the Assyrian Church of the East is original and unmutilated.
 

xOrthodox4Christx

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wgw said:
After Vatican II the Maronites went from a liturgy that was Romanized beyond belief, to what you would get if you took the West Syriac rite and ruined it.

The liturgy of the Assyrian Church of the East is original and unmutilated.
Interesting. So communion in the hand and unleavened bread are in the original Hallowing of Addai and Mari?
 

wgw

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xOrthodox4Christx said:
wgw said:
After Vatican II the Maronites went from a liturgy that was Romanized beyond belief, to what you would get if you took the West Syriac rite and ruined it.

The liturgy of the Assyrian Church of the East is original and unmutilated.
Interesting. So communion in the hand and unleavened bread are in the original Hallowing of Addai and Mari?
No.  They are also not in the liturgy of the Assyrian Church of the East.  At least not at any Assyrian church Ive ever seen.  Maybe the Chaldeans do it that way, or the Syro-Malabar catholics.
 

minasoliman

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I can at least for sure answer that the original way to take communion was to place it on the hand.  This is recorded by St. Cyril of Jerusalem and was even attested to in post-Chalcedonian writings of St. Severus and St. Philoxenus.

Whether leavened or unleavened that I do not know for the Assyrian tradition
 

wgw

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minasoliman said:
I can at least for sure answer that the original way to take communion was to place it on the hand.  This is recorded by St. Cyril of Jerusalem and was even attested to in post-Chalcedonian writings of St. Severus and St. Philoxenus.

Whether leavened or unleavened that I do not know for the Assyrian tradition
Its leavened.  The Assyrians claim to posess leaven dating back to the Last Supper, which is reused after every Eucharist.  They count the baking of the Eucharistic bread as a sacrament, called Malka, which literally means "King."

Practically, their Eucharistic bread is the same as that used by Coptics.
 

MalpanaGiwargis

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xOrthodox4Christx said:
I saw the priest doing the Mass facing the people, using leavened bread and giving communion in the hand. Are these Novus Ordo interpolations and innovations into the Eastern Rite?
"Facing the people" in the Chaldean Church is supposed to have been suppressed with the promulgation of the Reformed Mass in 2007 (which also introduced an audible anaphora); I guess it lives on in some places. Leavened bread is the authentic tradition of the Assyrian/Chaldeans, though the Catholics of East Syrian rite have used unleavened bread for some time. I'm not sure if there has been a push back to the authentic tradition. Communion in the hand is also traditional: ideally, the hand is purified first in the smoke of the incense, the Qurbana (the holy bread dipped in the chalice) is placed in the hand, and the communicant reverently bows to pick it up with the tongue - a far cry from modern RC practice. I'm not sure what it looks like in practice in modern Catholic churches.
 

Brigidsboy

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wgw said:
minasoliman said:
I can at least for sure answer that the original way to take communion was to place it on the hand.  This is recorded by St. Cyril of Jerusalem and was even attested to in post-Chalcedonian writings of St. Severus and St. Philoxenus.

Whether leavened or unleavened that I do not know for the Assyrian tradition
Its leavened.  The Assyrians claim to posess leaven dating back to the Last Supper, which is reused after every Eucharist.  They count the baking of the Eucharistic bread as a sacrament, called Malka, which literally means "King."

The Malka itself is the Sacrament.

Practically, their Eucharistic bread is the same as that used by Coptics.

Except that the Church of the East uses olive oil in the bread.
 

wgw

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Brigidsboy said:
wgw said:
minasoliman said:
I can at least for sure answer that the original way to take communion was to place it on the hand.  This is recorded by St. Cyril of Jerusalem and was even attested to in post-Chalcedonian writings of St. Severus and St. Philoxenus.

Whether leavened or unleavened that I do not know for the Assyrian tradition
Its leavened.  The Assyrians claim to posess leaven dating back to the Last Supper, which is reused after every Eucharist.  They count the baking of the Eucharistic bread as a sacrament, called Malka, which literally means "King."

The Malka itself is the Sacrament.

Practically, their Eucharistic bread is the same as that used by Coptics.

Except that the Church of the East uses olive oil in the bread.
Interesting.

By the way, I love Coptic antidoron.  I could live off of it.
 
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