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Looking for female saints who are good with children

Peacemaker

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I know that St Nicholas is the patron saint of children but I am trying to find a female equivalent for a lady friend of mine so she can relate a little better. Any ideas?

Thanks
 

Asteriktos

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I don't know if any particular person is explicitly considered a 'patron saint' of children, but fwiw St. Elizabeth (mother of John the Baptist) and St. Anna (mother of the Theotokos) might work. There's also a book of lives of married saints by David and Mary Ford, which might be worth checking out.
 

DeniseDenise

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Emmelia of Casearea

She was the wife of Basil the Elder and bore nine or ten children,[2] including Basil of Caesarea (born circa 330[3]), Macrina the Younger, Peter of Sebaste, Gregory of Nyssa, and Naucratius.

Emmelia—also known as Emilia or Emily—is venerated as a saint in both the Eastern Orthodox Church and the Roman Catholic Church[4] and is said to have died on May 30, 375.[2] However, she is not the only woman in her family to be venerated as a saint. Both her mother-in-law, Macrina the Elder, as well as her daughters, Macrina the Younger and Theosebia are recognized as saints in the Catholic Church (except for Theosebia) and Eastern Orthodox Church.

Emmelia spent much of her later years living with her eldest daughter, Macrina the Younger. Macrina the Younger had a profound impact on her mother. With her husband no longer around, Emmelia and her daughter lived a life dedicated to Christianity, surrounded by servants whom they treated as equals, at Macrina the Younger's insistence. Their ascetic way of life attracted a following of women which created a convent-like atmosphere, where one was considered rich if she lived a pure and devout Christian life and disregarded the materialistic lure of earthly pleasures and possessions.[5]
 
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