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Old vs. New Calendar?

Dominika

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I am part of a church that uses the Julian Calendar, and so I will use the Julian Calendar for the foreseeable future. If there is a solution implemented by a council that includes ALL Orthodox Churches, which fixes the lunar tables such that the Apostles Fast does not disappear on a late Pascha (and Kyriopascha could happen), I will accept that.
For Apostle Fast there is solution - come back to older traidion (the Hoyl Spirit Monday as beginningn) or what Romanian Chruch did (to start on Tuesday or Wednesday in the Pentecsot Week). Kyriopascha ctualyl it hink shouldn't happen at all (see e.g Copts).
 
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Here is what a priest told me some years ago that a calendar adjustment was studied by the imperial admin in Constantinople in the early 14th c. under Emperor Andronikos II but fell by the wayside because of too many other problems.


Below is what a priest told me about a 14th c. study re the calendar. From what I recall Andronikos II had too much on his plate, the Byzantine state was near its end & the study faded away.




Dear Ed,
I hope all is well. What happened was that in the 1320's, during the reign of the emperor Andronikos II, the astronomers in Constantinople, some of the best in the world, urged the emperor to look at the calendar which was obviously not correct with the fixed points of the seasons--solstices and equinoxes. By this point things in the sky were 8 days ahead of the calendar dating.. There was discussion, but the emperor never followed through with this and thus nothing was done. There were no synods. It was handled by the imperial administration. Father





It is too bad since what I recall reading about Emperor Andronikos seemed a good and just ruler. In our ongoing tragedies of this world, if there was more social stability, he might have been a great emperor.


 

ilyazhito

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It's a pity he never got to do this. Anyway, it would be an interesting and worthwhile project to pursue if Russia and Constantinople could set aside their differences.
 

jd01

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People who get bogged down in arguments comparing the supposed "accuracy" of the two seem to me to be missing the point, by which I mean no disrespect to you as one who is new to the calendar controversy. "More useful" depends not necessarily on "accuracy" but on what you want out of a calendar generally.

Quite simply, many Orthodox (myself included) reject the Revised Julian Calendar because it's not the calendar that was passed down to us from Roman/patristic times. In a liturgical context, connection to our forefathers through continuity in worship is far more important than mere astronomical accuracy. It unifies us not only today, but through the ages, aided by its cyclical nature which repeats every 532 years and is completely lacking in the new calendar. There are other differences which are often highlighted (and have been in this thread) and I don't want to understate their importance, but that continuity alone would suffice as a reason for traditionally-minded Orthodox Christians even absent the rest.

There's also the issue of how it came about, which has nothing to do with the new calendar per se but is still important to understand the resistance to it because it ushered in a period of often-bloody persecution against pious Orthodox clergy and laity whose only "crime" was continuing to practice the unaltered faith as it was passed down to them. The RJC was forced on the whole Church unilaterally by the Ecumenical Patriarchate under the highly-controversial Patriarch and known Freemason named Meletios, an act which was regarded by most jurisdictions as an empty papal pretension and ignored because even a perfectly good new calendar would need to be implemented by a pan-Orthodox council. He was chased out of Constantinople and made to resign after a fairly short tenure, but the division he caused was there to stay.

You'll often see anathemas against the Gregorian Calendar applied to the RJC, and that's because RJC was specifically devised in order to align much of our liturgical year with the GC and thus promote (or at the very least intentionally reopen the possibility of) concelebration with Roman Catholics and Protestants. That's where the problem of ecumenism comes in, which I won't go into any more than that because it'd add several paragraphs to what I'd hoped would be a short answer. Such hopes are always dashed quickly when talking about the calendar. 😅
Thank you. I better understand now. It has to do with priorities, I guess. For me, Jesus was unconcerned about the issue so I feel free to stress over "accuracy" as a pedestrian issue. BTW The Gregorian Calendar is simply better than the Julian, scientists use other "calendars" or time measurements that are far more accurate eg the Sideral Timekeeping. Indeed "calendar" in a wider sense is a meaningless concept, a crude way for humans to roughly handle time passage.
 

Tzimis

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Thank you. I better understand now. It has to do with priorities, I guess. For me, Jesus was unconcerned about the issue so I feel free to stress over "accuracy" as a pedestrian issue. BTW The Gregorian Calendar is simply better than the Julian, scientists use other "calendars" or time measurements that are far more accurate eg the Sideral Timekeeping. Indeed "calendar" in a wider sense is a meaningless concept, a crude way for humans to roughly handle time passage.
Not the revised Julian that the church uses.
 

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The revised calendar (whether Gregorian or the Milankovich one) is objectively more accurate than the old Julian one. There is no reason to stick to the old calendar, other than "this is how we've always done it and we're not about to change now, bah humbug!". In fact, this is not only irrational - it is also objectively false.

The entire point of the inaccuracy of the old calendar is that it gradually changes the correspondence of the calendar year to the solar year. What the old calendar calls "January 1st" is now 13 days later than when January 1st was 2000 years ago. In another 2000 years it would be about a month later.

Given that the revised calendars are not brand-new calendar systems, but merely revised versions of the Julian calendar, with the leap-year formula slightly adjusted for accuracy, there is not a single valid reason not to make the switch back to where the days used to be when the early church canonically adopted the Julian calendar in the first place. Let December 25th be the same December 25th as in the years of the Council of Nicea, rather than a fake Dec 25 that's actually 13 days later (the Sun itself being the witness). Persisting in an ever-increasing error is more than a calendar issue - it's a symptom of much deeper underlying spiritual problems.
 

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The problem is that the Paschalia will need to be adjusted to accommodate the new calendar. Hopefully, Orthodox can meet and agree on this, so that we don't have one year where there is no fast after Pentecost, and another where the fast is 6 weeks long! By comparison, with the traditional church calendar, there is always a St. Peter's fast.
If the new calendar can have the same liturgical sequence as the traditional one, I wouldn't be against it. That said, the purpose of the Church calendar is for Orthodox Christians to celebrate feasts together, so accuracy is a secondary consideration. If there is no better alternative to the traditional calendar right now, I'm sticking with it.
 

Dominika

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The problem is that the Paschalia will need to be adjusted to accommodate the new calendar. Hopefully, Orthodox can meet and agree on this, so that we don't have one year where there is no fast after Pentecost, and another where the fast is 6 weeks long! By comparison, with the traditional church calendar, there is always a St. Peter's fast.
I'm repeating myself constantly, even in this thread: if we bring the older date of the beginning of this fast, it won't disappear in the Revised Julian calendar. And already Romanian Church has done it (but only in the year in which Pascha is late), so not only OOs.
 

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You have a point. That said, I would rather see Paschalia and fixed feasts be consistent than have to deal with the mismatch that Revised Julian users have.

When I grew up, I didn't have a strong preference between Julian and Revised Julian, because I was exposed to both calendars through my attending and/or visiting both OCA and ROCOR parishes. Since I decided to stay with ROCOR, I've become pro-Julian Calendar, but I'm not as fanatical about some. For me, the biggest sticking points are a) the Revised Julian Calendar was not adopted universally and organically, but rather forced on some Churches by the civil authorities, and b) unity of observance with other Orthodox is more important than astronomical accuracy or observances together with heterodox. The calendars will only drift by 1 day a century, so by the time the difference really becomes significant, we'll either be dead, or the second coming will have happened. The third consideration is that having a Julian Paschalia but Gregorian fixed dates sometimes leads to Liturgical absurdities (no Kyriopascha, no Apostles Fast in some years).


I see three possible solutions: universally revert to the Julian calendar, fix the relationship between Church and civil calendars to avoid time drift (practically similar to Julian, except no Pascha in summer or winter issue, can use existing Pascha tables), or set new Paschal tables based on Gregorian fixed dates but following Orthodox canons (Pascha must be after Passover, must be Sunday after 1st full moon after vernal equinox, etc.). I would favor universal reversion to the Julian calendar, because it would follow traditional Orthodox practice and help us to reconnect our estranged Old Calendarist brethren to the Church. To my knowledge, the forced transition of some churches away from the Old Calendar (Greece, Romania, and Bulgaria), led the Old Calendarists to split off from the official church. That said, I will support any of these solutions if they are universally adopted.
 

Dominika

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I would favor universal reversion to the Julian calendar, because it would follow traditional Orthodox practice and help us to reconnect our estranged Old Calendarist brethren to the Church. To my knowledge, the forced transition of some churches away from the Old Calendar (Greece, Romania, and Bulgaria), led the Old Calendarists to split off from the official church. That said, I will support any of these solutions if they are universally adopted.
It won't help to bring majority fo them, as calendar it's not the only issue. Even in Serbia (Serbian Church except maybe a few parishes follows old calendar) there is one or two Old Calendarists groups...
 

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following Orthodox canons (Pascha must be after Passover, must be Sunday after 1st full moon after vernal equinox, etc.).
This is actually a misunderstanding, not a canon.


To my knowledge, the forced transition of some churches away from the Old Calendar (Greece, Romania, and Bulgaria), led the Old Calendarists to split off from the official church.
Can't answer for the others, but the transition in Greece was anything but forced. The Synod of the Church of Greece, in conjunction with the EP, which still oversees a good part of the country, decided, as was their prerogative, in 1924 to align with the state, which had adopted the new calendar in 1923. End of, or should have been, if some people hadn't thrown a hissy fit in disobedience of their bishops.
 

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unity of observance with other Orthodox is more important than astronomical accuracy
Astronomy is the study of celestial bodies, which are given by God as signs, among other things. There is no basis for dismissing the inaccuracy of the old Julian calendar as "merely astronomical". Might as well do the eucharist with cornbread and tequila, and then say "the differences are merely culinary, what's really important is that we all persist in error together, and not join with those heterodox!"
 

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Take a look at http://orthodoxinfo.com/ecumenism/calendar_bond.aspx
This is from a traditional Orthodox website that has entries from both canonical (ROCOR) and non-canonical (Old Calendarist) sources. The author, Andrew Bond (presumably the same Andrew Bond who is now a ROCOR deacon in Mettingham), mentions the First Canon of the Synod of Antioch (341) to state that if anyone disturbs proper order by "observing Easter with the Jews", he will be deposed. This means, in practical terms, that Pascha must come after Passover.
Bond also advances the argument that Orthodox practice does not depend on astronomical accuracy, and even advances the argument that scientific truths can be unreliable. While I don't agree with the last statement, I understand the point that he is trying to make. We should not be so enamoured with scientific accuracy that we forget about the purpose of the Orthodox calendar: to organize time so that Orthodox can celebrate feasts together.
 

ilyazhito

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This article shows, in even more detail, how the New Calendar leads to liturgical absurdities. Take especial note of footnote 162. There, it describes the specific symbolism of the feast of the 40 Martyrs of Sebaste, and how it makes more sense to celebrate their commemmoration in Lent. That always happens under the Julian Calendar when the Julian Paschalion is used. However, due to the mismatch between Paschalion and fixed dates in the New Calendar, sometimes, the Feast happens before Lent (regular March 9 can happen before Lent, but Julian March 9 (March 22) cannot). It also goes on to describes the specifics of the Feast of St. George, nominally on April 23 (it usually happens on or around Pascha, the latest possible Pascha per the Julian tables, is April 25 (May 8)).
 

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The third consideration is that having a Julian Paschalia but Gregorian fixed dates sometimes leads to Liturgical absurdities (no Kyriopascha, no Apostles Fast in some years).
These are themselves something of liturgical absurdities, actually. For instance, there was no Apostles Fast as we know it until, potentially, the 9th century (St Nikephoros)! Before that, there was (in some places) a resumption of fasting after the week of Pentecost, which was later put into writing (Apostolic Constitutions: 5.20)—but even here it seems to imply a resumption of *normal Wednesday and Friday fasting*, not a separate new fast.

or set new Paschal tables based on Gregorian fixed dates but following Orthodox canons (Pascha must be after Passover, must be Sunday after 1st full moon after vernal equinox, etc.).
While already mentioned by others, the date of Pascha is *not* regulated by the canons in the way you are suggesting.

Bond also advances the argument that Orthodox practice does not depend on astronomical accuracy, and even advances the argument that scientific truths can be unreliable.
Just wait until someone shows him all the "religious truths" out there!
 

Dominika

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This article shows, in even more detail, how the New Calendar leads to liturgical absurdities. Take especial note of footnote 162. There, it describes the specific symbolism of the feast of the 40 Martyrs of Sebaste, and how it makes more sense to celebrate their commemmoration in Lent. That always happens under the Julian Calendar when the Julian Paschalion is used. However, due to the mismatch between Paschalion and fixed dates in the New Calendar, sometimes, the Feast happens before Lent (regular March 9 can happen before Lent, but Julian March 9 (March 22) cannot). It also goes on to describes the specifics of the Feast of St. George, nominally on April 23 (it usually happens on or around Pascha, the latest possible Pascha per the Julian tables, is April 25 (May 8)).
With this I do not agree.

1. Apostles Fast - I've wrriten planty of times, Bizzlebin also has written now
2. Marytys of Sebaste - anwayy it's in the Triodion period, and if ir embem corretly, fasitng period (the earleist is Cheesfar week)
3. Kiriopascha - for me acutally ti's ridiculous that any other feast may be on Pascha (except comemraiton of saints) or two feats from 12 on the same day (Palm Sunday and Annunciation). Typikon had to cope with those, now in the Revised Calendar it doesn't happen. From Lazarus Saturday utnil Antipascha all comemratiosn are almsto ceased, plus speical intentions. It's a food for thought.
4. Dates of feasts wre changing and even until now are not the same ven in Byzantine rite, to not mention other rites. Typikon in the shape we have now it's sth very late and even oru ltirugical books do nto say a lot of things, icnlduing, prayers, that we practice... Yes it is not dogmatised and even put into very cocnrete frames, so no reason to be sticked to this in 100%.
 

Fr. George

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Take a look at http://orthodoxinfo.com/ecumenism/calendar_bond.aspx
This is from a traditional Orthodox website that has entries from both canonical (ROCOR) and non-canonical (Old Calendarist) sources. The author, Andrew Bond (presumably the same Andrew Bond who is now a ROCOR deacon in Mettingham), mentions the First Canon of the Synod of Antioch (341) to state that if anyone disturbs proper order by "observing Easter with the Jews", he will be deposed. This means, in practical terms, that Pascha must come after Passover.
The problem at the time (4th c) was that many Jewish communities were not celebrating Passover according to the Biblical formula - so the canon was enjoining them to not look to the local Jewish community for guidance on when the Passover should fall.

The Passover (14 Nisan) is already contained in our formula: 1st Sunday {Christian conciliar addition} following the 1st full moon (14th of the lunar month) following the Vernal Equinox (lunar month of Nisan). In years when the drift of the lunar year vs. the solar year created a 13th full moon in an Vernal Equinox-to-Vernal Equinox year, the 12th month was to be duplicated, so that Nisan would always fall with the 1st full moon post-VE. There is no need to reference anything else if you use the formula (1st Sunday after the 1st full moon following the Vernal Equinox) since the Scriptural formula for Passover (1st full moon following the Vernal Equinox = 14 Nisan) is already contained therein.

(Also keep in mind that there was a difference between the religious New Year - Passover - and the civil New Year - Rosh Hashanah, the celebration of creation, the ceremonial blowing of the trumpets, "Head of the Year.")
 

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Wow, it is surprising that many Jewish communities did not follow the Biblical formula in Passover. I would have to assume that the specific canon was calling out the Quartodecimans who would celebrate 14 Nisan as Pascha, because that's when the death of Jesus Christ happened.

That's not too far off, because it makes some sense for the New Pascha to be in some way conected to the Seder, the celebration of the Old Pascha (Pesach). However, it was just a coincedence that 14 Nisan was a Thursday, and so the actual date of Pascha was between Saturday, 16 Nisan 33 and Sunday, 17 Nisan 33. It wouldn't line up like that most years, hence the "Sunday following 1st full moon after the vernal equinox" language.
 

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As for Annunciation, it's also good to read synaxarion of the Cheesfare Sunday:
Wishing to present all these things to us, therefore, the God-bearing Fathers, through the entire Triodion, set forth the events of the Old Testament.
First of these is the creation, and Adam’s fall from Paradise, which we are now commemorating, and then they set forth the rest, through the books of Moses and the Prophets and the words of David, and then, in order, the events of the New Testament, that of Grace. First of these is the Annunciation, which took place by God’s ineffable Economy, and which almost always falls within the Holy Fast [in Arabic, Church Slavonic, Polish - so I suppose original Greek too - it's "40 days"]. They continue with Lazarus Saturday, Palm Sunday, and Holy and Great Week, when the Holy Gospels are read, and the Holy and saving Passion of Christ, which is the subject of exquisite hymns; and then, with the Resurrection and the other Feasts, until the descent of the Holy Spirit, concerning which the Book of Acts relates how the Gospel was proclaimed and how the Spirit gathered all the Saints together; for the Acts of the Apostles confirms the Resurrection through the miracles worked by the Apostles.
Source
 

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the First Canon of the Synod of Antioch (341) to state that if anyone disturbs proper order by "observing Easter with the Jews", he will be deposed. This means, in practical terms, that Pascha must come after Passover.
No it doesn't. It means that the church must not use the Jewish month of Nisan, as it was calculated in the 3rd century, to set the date of the Christian festival, but to use an independently-calculated month of Nisan (or "month of the new" as the Fathers called it) to set the date of the Christian festival.
 

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As stated previously, the issue is not with the full moon - but with the Julian calendar date for the Equinox (which is 13 days later than the actual observable equinox).
But the issue is with the full moon. This year, the Gregorian moon is full on April 16th and the Julian moon is not full until April 20th. That is why the Easters are a week apart.

And when was it "stated previously" that there was no issue with the Julian lunar tables?
 

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But the issue is with the full moon. This year, the Gregorian moon is full on April 16th and the Julian moon is not full until April 20th. That is why the Easters are a week apart.
A week apart isn't much of an issue, IMO. But that's related to a calculated full moon - which both East and West use - versus the observable full moon. Neither Church has a 100% accurate set of lunar tables, but they are certainly different, and the West's is more accurate when compared to the observable full moon.

When they're a month apart, it's a joke.

(Not that I'm trying to diminish the efficacy of the services - Pascha happens when we ask God to make it so, in cooperation with His Grace and Love.)
 

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A new Church calendar could reset the Paschalia to follow actual equinox dates, or use Gregorian dates to calculate the equinox (Have the equinox be March 22, for instance). Such a system, in concert with Gregorian dates for movable feasts would create the same effect as Julian Paschalia/Julian fixed calendar. However, a change like this would have to be endorsed by all Churches.

I don't like the current status quo where churches are divided based on which calendar they use. It makes the Old Calendarists look right when they discredit mainstream Orthodoxy for mainstream Orthodoxy's ecumenism and disunity (from the Old Calendarists' POV). I would support a solution where we either all go back to the Julian calendar, and reach out to the Old Calendarists to bring them back on board, or we all adopt a new calendar that matches astronomical criteria and allows Pascha observance to match the immovable cycle. I'm in ROCOR, so I will support the Julian calendar because that is what my church uses. However, I am open to any reasonable alternatives, as long as those are adopted by all Orthodox without external pressure.
 

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(Have the equinox be March 22, for instance).
It would be nice if we made a push to move it back to the 25th. So the Incarnation happens on the equinox (March 25th), Nativity happens on the solstice (December 25th), etc. If we're going to fix stuff let's really fix it!

Such a system, in concert with Gregorian dates for movable feasts would create the same effect as Julian Paschalia/Julian fixed calendar. However, a change like this would have to be endorsed by all Churches.
That's the trick, isn't it? There are plenty that will disagree simply on principle, as the "One" in One, Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic Church is actually an affront to them (despite what they otherwise say). And then we have to figure out just what we mean by "all Churches"—this will inevitably have to be watered down, and then we're potentially back where we started (though hopefully with a more sensible system, for when those "all Churches" are ready to accept it).
 

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A week apart isn't much of an issue, IMO.
A week apart is a serious issue when the extra week takes the festival out of the third week of the visible moon's phases. The computus was designed as much as possible to place the festival in the third week of the visible moon's phases, counting the lunar month as beginning with the first appearance of the waxing crescent. Since the computus is based on the average lunar motion it doesn't always do this perfectly, but the Gregorian computus manages it most of the time. This year, however, the Julian computus puts the festival in the fourth week of the moon's phases.
 

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Wow, it is surprising that many Jewish communities did not follow the Biblical formula in Passover.
Fr. George was overstating the case for a Biblical formula of Passover. The only Biblical prescription for Passover is that it occurs on the fourteenth day of the first lunar month. Jewish communities in the third and fourth centuries did this. What they didn't do in every place was follow a rule of the equinox. The third- and fourth-century Christian computists insisted on a rule of the equinox, relying on Josephus, who wrote:

Josephus said:
In the month of Xanthicus, which with us is called Nisan and begins the year, on the fourteenth day by lunar reckoning, the sun being then in Aries, our lawgiver, seeing that in this month we were delivered from bondage to the Egyptians, ordained that we should year by year offer the same sacrifice which...we offered then on departure from Egypt--the sacrifice called Pascha.
The third- and fourth century computists took Josephus at his literal word and insisted that the first month must be the one whose fourteenth day fell when the sun was in Aries, that is, on or after the equinox. Christians who relied on their Jewish neighbors to tell them when the week of Unleavened Bread would fall and set Easter to the Sunday in that week would be celebrating before the equinox if their Jewish neighbors did not follow a rule of the equinox: And therefore, from the point of view of the computists, they would be celebrating Easter in the last month of the old year rather than in the first month of the new year. The canon, as Fr. George stated, is directed toward Christians who followed the old tradition of relying on their Jewish neighbors' calendar and thereby celebrated Easter before the equinox.
 

ilyazhito

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A new Church calendar could reset the Paschalia to follow actual equinox dates, or use Gregorian dates to calculate the equinox (Have the equinox be March 22, for instance). Such a system, in concert with Gregorian dates for movable feasts would create the same effect as Julian Paschalia/Julian fixed calendar. However, a change like this would have to be endorsed by all Orthodox Churches.

I don't like the current status quo where churches are divided based on which calendar they use. It makes the Old Calendarists look right when they discredit mainstream Orthodoxy for mainstream Orthodoxy's ecumenism and disunity (from the Old Calendarists' POV). I would support a solution where we either all go back to the Julian calendar, and reach out to the Old Calendarists to bring them back on board, or we all adopt a new calendar that matches astronomical criteria and allows Pascha observance to match the immovable cycle. I'm in ROCOR, so I will support the Julian calendar because that is what my church uses. However, I am open to any reasonable alternatives, as long as those are adopted by all Orthodox without external pressure.
Fixed. We will not rely on anyone outside the Orthodox communion to solve our calendar issues. Only Orthodox churches will be involved in deciding on a new calendar, if one is to come to pass.

In the absence of any calendar reform, I would revert to the Julian Calendar, as that would be more consistent with traditional Orthodox practice.
 

Fr. George

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A week apart is a serious issue when the extra week takes the festival out of the third week of the visible moon's phases. The computus was designed as much as possible to place the festival in the third week of the visible moon's phases, counting the lunar month as beginning with the first appearance of the waxing crescent. Since the computus is based on the average lunar motion it doesn't always do this perfectly, but the Gregorian computus manages it most of the time. This year, however, the Julian computus puts the festival in the fourth week of the moon's phases.
I didn't claim it wasn't an issue - but when one is routinely asked to celebrate the feast over a month late, the one-week shifts are more of a nuisance than a challenge. Let us fix our more fundamental issue (calculating the 1st lunar cycle using the Julian fixed-date Equinox) before we get to the issue of fixing the pre-calculated lunar cycles.
 

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Father John Whiteford (ROCOR), in this interview, states that, according to people who have done research into the question, the Sigillon of 1583 is a 19th-century forgery. (Fr. John's statement begins at 23:58 of the video). Is anyone on-list familiar with the inquiry into the authenticity of the Sigillon of 1583? What are the arguments in support of denying the Sigillon's authenticity?
 

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Father John Whiteford (ROCOR), in this interview, states that, according to people who have done research into the question, the Sigillon of 1583 is a 19th-century forgery. (Fr. John's statement begins at 23:58 of the video). Is anyone on-list familiar with the inquiry into the authenticity of the Sigillon of 1583? What are the arguments in support of denying the Sigillon's authenticity?

An article on the subject by Fr. Theoklitos can be read here:


Since this one article by Fr. Theoklitos is all that I could formerly find on the subject in English, I was asked to find supporting information to back up his claims. The Old Calendarist “Synod in Resistance” in Greece has recently provided a summary in English of a scholarly paper by Bishop Cyprian of Oreoi which goes into greater detail regarding this forgery. Among other things, Bishop Cyprian of Oreoi of the Synod in Resistance states:
The reply should work here, but this prior comment seems to have more info
 

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Here is a discussion about the calendar issue involving several people including an Archbishop Job Getcha. I don't know what jurisdiction he's from. Archbishop Job, in his overview of the history of the calendar issue, makes a minor mistake. He implies that the Orthodox Church of Finland adopted the Milankovitch paschalion, when in fact is uses the Gregorian calendar.
 
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Here is a discussion about the calendar issue involving several people including an Archbishop Job Getcha. I don't know what jurisdiction he's from. Archbishop Job, in his overview of the history of the calendar issue, makes a minor mistake. He implies that the Orthodox Church of Finland adopted the Milankovitch paschalion, when in fact is uses the Gregorian calendar.
He's EP.
 
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