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On the Reading and Teaching of Naughty Latin Poetry

Cyrillic

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How I miss the old Loeb editions, in which the naughty bits were in Latin. It certainly added a bit of mystique and a sense of exclusivity. You had to work to get to the honey. With those modern translations everyone can read those parts.

One of the finer examples: Catullus XVI in the old Loeb
 

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scamandrius

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Cyrillic said:
How I miss the old Loeb editions, in which the naughty bits were in Latin. It certainly added a bit of mystique and a sense of exclusivity. You had to work to get to the honey. With those modern translations everyone can read those parts.

One of the finer examples: Catullus XVI in the old Loeb
I have that edition.  Whenever I teach Catullus to my students I have to gloss some of the more naughty words in a way that allows them to realize the meaning without having to just say it out loud. 
 

scamandrius

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TheTrisagion

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scamandrius said:
Cyrillic said:
How I miss the old Loeb editions, in which the naughty bits were in Latin. It certainly added a bit of mystique and a sense of exclusivity. You had to work to get to the honey. With those modern translations everyone can read those parts.

One of the finer examples: Catullus XVI in the old Loeb
I have that edition.  Whenever I teach Catullus to my students I have to gloss some of the more naughty words in a way that allows them to realize the meaning without having to just say it out loud.
Puritanism extends even to academia?
 

Cyrillic

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scamandrius said:
Cyrillic said:
How I miss the old Loeb editions, in which the naughty bits were in Latin. It certainly added a bit of mystique and a sense of exclusivity. You had to work to get to the honey. With those modern translations everyone can read those parts.

One of the finer examples: Catullus XVI in the old Loeb
I have that edition.  Whenever I teach Catullus to my students I have to gloss some of the more naughty words in a way that allows them to realize the meaning without having to just say it out loud.
Ah, I think the uncensored version really motivates pupils to learn their Latin.
 

scamandrius

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Cyrillic said:
scamandrius said:
Cyrillic said:
How I miss the old Loeb editions, in which the naughty bits were in Latin. It certainly added a bit of mystique and a sense of exclusivity. You had to work to get to the honey. With those modern translations everyone can read those parts.

One of the finer examples: Catullus XVI in the old Loeb
I have that edition.  Whenever I teach Catullus to my students I have to gloss some of the more naughty words in a way that allows them to realize the meaning without having to just say it out loud.
Beats the point of reading it, I think.

.
No, we still do get into the "meaning" but for some of my students, they'll just giggle like like little children and then they tell their parents, then I get fired.
 

scamandrius

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TheTrisagion said:
scamandrius said:
Cyrillic said:
How I miss the old Loeb editions, in which the naughty bits were in Latin. It certainly added a bit of mystique and a sense of exclusivity. You had to work to get to the honey. With those modern translations everyone can read those parts.

One of the finer examples: Catullus XVI in the old Loeb
I have that edition.  Whenever I teach Catullus to my students I have to gloss some of the more naughty words in a way that allows them to realize the meaning without having to just say it out loud.
Puritanism extends even to academia?
To an extent, yes.  I'm not a puritan, but a lot of my students' parents are.  Since I'm at a private school, I have to toe the line at times.  Fortunately, the students whom I teach at the upper levels where this material could be studied are the ones who wouldn't care or encourage me.  Still, I have to toe a line.
 

scamandrius

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Cyrillic said:
scamandrius said:
Cyrillic said:
How I miss the old Loeb editions, in which the naughty bits were in Latin. It certainly added a bit of mystique and a sense of exclusivity. You had to work to get to the honey. With those modern translations everyone can read those parts.

One of the finer examples: Catullus XVI in the old Loeb
I have that edition.  Whenever I teach Catullus to my students I have to gloss some of the more naughty words in a way that allows them to realize the meaning without having to just say it out loud.
Ah, I think the uncensored version really motivates pupils to learn their Latin.
Latin has over 800 different profanities, more than any other language.  Every year, my students want me to teach them curse words (which don't really exist per se; they are far more metaphorical) and I tell them no.  Besides, they can operate the google machine and find out for themselves.
 

vamrat

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scamandrius said:
Cyrillic said:
scamandrius said:
Cyrillic said:
How I miss the old Loeb editions, in which the naughty bits were in Latin. It certainly added a bit of mystique and a sense of exclusivity. You had to work to get to the honey. With those modern translations everyone can read those parts.

One of the finer examples: Catullus XVI in the old Loeb
I have that edition.  Whenever I teach Catullus to my students I have to gloss some of the more naughty words in a way that allows them to realize the meaning without having to just say it out loud.
Ah, I think the uncensored version really motivates pupils to learn their Latin.
Latin has over 800 different profanities, more than any other language.  Every year, my students want me to teach them curse words (which don't really exist per se; they are far more metaphorical) and I tell them no.  Besides, they can operate the google machine and find out for themselves.
800???  Gesh.  I only know like a dozen in Latin.
 

Cyrillic

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scamandrius said:
TheTrisagion said:
scamandrius said:
Cyrillic said:
How I miss the old Loeb editions, in which the naughty bits were in Latin. It certainly added a bit of mystique and a sense of exclusivity. You had to work to get to the honey. With those modern translations everyone can read those parts.

One of the finer examples: Catullus XVI in the old Loeb
I have that edition.  Whenever I teach Catullus to my students I have to gloss some of the more naughty words in a way that allows them to realize the meaning without having to just say it out loud.
Puritanism extends even to academia?
To an extent, yes.  I'm not a puritan, but a lot of my students' parents are.  Since I'm at a private school, I have to toe the line at times.  Fortunately, the students whom I teach at the upper levels where this material could be studied are the ones who wouldn't care or encourage me.  Still, I have to toe a line.
Puritanism would eliminate a lot of the lyrical and elegiac poetry from the curriculum, and not only because of sexual references. Horace's "Eheu fugaces etc.", for example, or Tibullus' paraclausithyra would be axed as well. Poor Lucretius wouldn't fare much better.
 

scamandrius

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Cyrillic said:
scamandrius said:
TheTrisagion said:
scamandrius said:
Cyrillic said:
How I miss the old Loeb editions, in which the naughty bits were in Latin. It certainly added a bit of mystique and a sense of exclusivity. You had to work to get to the honey. With those modern translations everyone can read those parts.

One of the finer examples: Catullus XVI in the old Loeb
I have that edition.  Whenever I teach Catullus to my students I have to gloss some of the more naughty words in a way that allows them to realize the meaning without having to just say it out loud.
Puritanism extends even to academia?
To an extent, yes.  I'm not a puritan, but a lot of my students' parents are.  Since I'm at a private school, I have to toe the line at times.  Fortunately, the students whom I teach at the upper levels where this material could be studied are the ones who wouldn't care or encourage me.  Still, I have to toe a line.
Puritanism would eliminate a lot of the lyrical and elegiac poetry from the curriculum, and not only because of sexual references. Horace's "Eheu fugaces etc.", for example, or Tibullus' paraclausithyra would be axed as well. Poor Lucretius wouldn't fare much better.
YOu're right.  Fortunately, I have an administration (right now) willing to back me on my choice of literature.  You can't teach the sublime without also teaching the grotesque.
 

augustin717

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When I first read Petronius the juicy bits were left untranslated . I was reading a translation prob made in the fifties or the sixties.
 
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