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Orthodox-Catholic Intercommunion in Pennsylvania?!

OrthoNoob

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I was recently told online by a man who claims to belong to the Byzantine Catholic Archeparchy of Pittsburgh that he freely receives Communion in Greek Orthodox and Roman Catholic Churches alike.

I couldn't find anything on the Archeparchy's website to indicate whether this is their policy, and it's too specific to be easily Googleable.

Does anyone know about this practice, and whether it is officially sanctioned?
 

OrthoNoob

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Tallitot said:
He's probably doing it on his own.
He claims (again, I dont know how much store to set by this) that Metropolitan +NICHOLAS is aware of his ecclesiastical status and allows him to receive Holy Communion.
 
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If he is Byzantine Catholic, then he can freely receive Holy Communion at a Catholic parish of any liturgical rite, whether Roman or Eastern.

As for being able to receive in a Greek Orthodox parish, that is generally not done.
 

Asteriktos

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It wouldn't be completely surprising, but definitely not official, or semi-official, or we-have-no-comment-official. Also, are you sure it's in Pennsylvania? Are you speaking of the Met. Nicholas of the Greek Orthodox, who is in Detroit (Pittsburgh is a different metropolis)? The Byzantine Catholic Archeparchy of Pittsburgh isn't just in PA, but stretches all the way to TX.
 

frjohnmorris

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OrthoNoob said:
I was recently told online by a man who claims to belong to the Byzantine Catholic Archeparchy of Pittsburgh that he freely receives Communion in Greek Orthodox and Roman Catholic Churches alike.

I couldn't find anything on the Archeparchy's website to indicate whether this is their policy, and it's too specific to be easily Googleable.

Does anyone know about this practice, and whether it is officially sanctioned?
As a Byzantine Catholic he can receive Holy Communion in a Latin Rite Catholic Church because the Byzantine Catholics are in Communion with Rome. However, non-Orthodox regardless of their Rite cannot receive Communion in Eastern Orthodox Churches. Byzantine Catholics are not in Communion with the Eastern Orthodox Church. Thus, the practice of a Byzantine Catholic receiving Communion in a Greek or any other Eastern Orthodox Church would not be sanctioned. Either the Greek Orthodox Priest is not following the rules, or most likely, he does not know that the Byzantine Catholic person is not Eastern Orthodox.

Fr. John W. Morris
 

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OrthoNoob said:
Tallitot said:
He's probably doing it on his own.
He claims (again, I dont know how much store to set by this) that Metropolitan +NICHOLAS is aware of his ecclesiastical status and allows him to receive Holy Communion.
That would be tough.
 

Irish Melkite

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I'm thinking that this individual is taking you for a ride. There are always a few folk bouncing around the net who claim to be routinely communed in Orthodox Churches despite being (usually) Catholic - sometimes Byzantine, sometimes Latin. My personal impression is that few, if any, of them are telling the truth or else they're communing at an Orthodox parish large enough that the priest won't know all the communicants - which they should not be doing.

(I'm not saying it doesn't or hasn't happened. There were times and places where this wasn't all that uncommon - most notably among Antiochians, Melkites, and Syriacs in the Northeast about 30-40 years back - but it's so uncommon now as to be invisible.)

If he's in PA, and throwing Metropolitan Nicholas' name around, why do I find myself certain that he's referring to Metropolitan Nicholas, of blessed memory, from ACROD. More proof positive that this is a story.

Many years,

Neil
 

podkarpatska

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Fr. John and Neil have summed it up. FYI, the ACROD pew book clearly states only Orthodox Christians spiritually prepared are allows to commune at the proper point in the liturgical text. If an Eastern Catholic parents himself as an Orthodox Christian, I would argue any sin is clearly on him, regardless of what his church teaches. To us Orthodox, inter communion is the END result of future church unity, not a step towards it.
 

Iconodule

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Just tell him he's eating and drinking his own condemnation and one day while he's on the john his guts are going to fall out. Then walk away.
 

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Iconodule said:
Just tell him he's eating and drinking his own condemnation and one day while he's on the john his guts are going to fall out. Then walk away.
 

AntoniousNikolas

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Tallitot said:
He's probably doing it on his own.
This.

Unfortunately, I used to know a Copt who did the same thing.  Without the knowledge of his bishop. he used to visit the local Catholic church where he was freely communed.  I told him he was wrong to do so, but he said, "If we don't start doing it, unity will never happen.  We're one in Jesus Christ, blah, blah, blah..."  At the end of the day, that's between him and God.  God have mercy on him, and me, a miserable sinner.
 

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podkarpatska said:
Fr. John and Neil have summed it up. FYI, the ACROD pew book clearly states only Orthodox Christians spiritually prepared are allows to commune at the proper point in the liturgical text. If an Eastern Catholic parents himself as an Orthodox Christian, I would argue any sin is clearly on him, regardless of what his church teaches. To us Orthodox, inter communion is the END result of future church unity, not a step towards it.
If someone approaches the Chalice and I do not know them, I always ask them if they are Orthodox. If they tell me that they are Orthodox and are not, they are committing a terrible sin by lying to receive the Eucharist. Some people are offended, but I would rather offend someone who should not take Communion than offend God by giving it to them to avoid an argument. Once a Melkite woman wanted to take Communion in my Church. I tried to diplomatically tell her that only members of the Eastern Orthodox Church can take Communion. She argued with me and finally told me that she had said the same thing to Metropolitan Philip a few weeks before when he refused to give her Communion. Once an Episcopalian was in town for a funeral of a relative who was a member of my parish. She wanted to take Communion and naturally, I told her that she could not take Communion in the Orthodox Church. She came back for the 40 Day Memorial and told me that she had spoken with her Episcopal Bishop who told her that I had no right to deny her Communion. I reminded her that Episcopal Bishops have no authority over what we do in the Orthodox Church. We have a sheet in every pew that welcomes visitors, but informs them that only Eastern Orthodox Christians can take Holy Communion, but some people who are not Orthodox occasionally approach the Chalice. A few months ago, I was waiting in line to pay for my purchases at the local Walgreen's. The man before me turned to me and began to loudly complain in front of all the people in line that I had denied him Communion. I told him that in our Church only faithful members of the Eastern Orthodox Church may receive the Eucharist if they have prepared by fasting, prayers and Confession.
When a new Priest is ordained, after the Anaphora, the Bishop puts the consecrated Lamb on a diskos and hands it to him saying something like, "You must guard and protect the Eucharist for you will be held accountable at the Last Judgment if you have knowingly given Communion to someone who is unworthy."

Fr. John W. Morris
 

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That's exactly right father, you are acting faithfully in guarding the most holy gifts according to the canons of the Church.  Not that you needed to hear that from me, but I just wanted to give you some support :)
 

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It might work in parish with less than 200 people. My home parish is 7k (or 12, not really sure). One would not be able to remember all of them.
 

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Michał Kalina said:
It might work in parish with less than 200 people. My home parish is 7k (or 12, not really sure). One would not be able to remember all of them.
In that case an announcement should be made before Communion or a statement placed in the bulletin that only Orthodox Christians in good standing who have prepared with prayer, fasting and Confession may receive the Eucharist.

Fr. John W. Morris
 

ialmisry

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frjohnmorris said:
podkarpatska said:
Fr. John and Neil have summed it up. FYI, the ACROD pew book clearly states only Orthodox Christians spiritually prepared are allows to commune at the proper point in the liturgical text. If an Eastern Catholic parents himself as an Orthodox Christian, I would argue any sin is clearly on him, regardless of what his church teaches. To us Orthodox, inter communion is the END result of future church unity, not a step towards it.
If someone approaches the Chalice and I do not know them, I always ask them if they are Orthodox. If they tell me that they are Orthodox and are not, they are committing a terrible sin by lying to receive the Eucharist. Some people are offended, but I would rather offend someone who should not take Communion than offend God by giving it to them to avoid an argument. Once a Melkite woman wanted to take Communion in my Church. I tried to diplomatically tell her that only members of the Eastern Orthodox Church can take Communion. She argued with me and finally told me that she had said the same thing to Metropolitan Philip a few weeks before when he refused to give her Communion. Once an Episcopalian was in town for a funeral of a relative who was a member of my parish. She wanted to take Communion and naturally, I told her that she could not take Communion in the Orthodox Church. She came back for the 40 Day Memorial and told me that she had spoken with her Episcopal Bishop who told her that I had no right to deny her Communion. I reminded her that Episcopal Bishops have no authority over what we do in the Orthodox Church. We have a sheet in every pew that welcomes visitors, but informs them that only Eastern Orthodox Christians can take Holy Communion, but some people who are not Orthodox occasionally approach the Chalice. A few months ago, I was waiting in line to pay for my purchases at the local Walgreen's. The man before me turned to me and began to loudly complain in front of all the people in line that I had denied him Communion. I told him that in our Church only faithful members of the Eastern Orthodox Church may receive the Eucharist if they have prepared by fasting, prayers and Confession.
When a new Priest is ordained, after the Anaphora, the Bishop puts the consecrated Lamb on a diskos and hands it to him saying something like, "You must guard and protect the Eucharist for you will be held accountable at the Last Judgment if you have knowingly given Communion to someone who is unworthy."

Fr. John W. Morris
I seem to recall Elijah Maria claiming a lot of intercommunion going on, but she couldn't give specific names, due to us "uncharitable" Orthodox.
 

podkarpatska

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ialmisry said:
frjohnmorris said:
podkarpatska said:
Fr. John and Neil have summed it up. FYI, the ACROD pew book clearly states only Orthodox Christians spiritually prepared are allows to commune at the proper point in the liturgical text. If an Eastern Catholic parents himself as an Orthodox Christian, I would argue any sin is clearly on him, regardless of what his church teaches. To us Orthodox, inter communion is the END result of future church unity, not a step towards it.
If someone approaches the Chalice and I do not know them, I always ask them if they are Orthodox. If they tell me that they are Orthodox and are not, they are committing a terrible sin by lying to receive the Eucharist. Some people are offended, but I would rather offend someone who should not take Communion than offend God by giving it to them to avoid an argument. Once a Melkite woman wanted to take Communion in my Church. I tried to diplomatically tell her that only members of the Eastern Orthodox Church can take Communion. She argued with me and finally told me that she had said the same thing to Metropolitan Philip a few weeks before when he refused to give her Communion. Once an Episcopalian was in town for a funeral of a relative who was a member of my parish. She wanted to take Communion and naturally, I told her that she could not take Communion in the Orthodox Church. She came back for the 40 Day Memorial and told me that she had spoken with her Episcopal Bishop who told her that I had no right to deny her Communion. I reminded her that Episcopal Bishops have no authority over what we do in the Orthodox Church. We have a sheet in every pew that welcomes visitors, but informs them that only Eastern Orthodox Christians can take Holy Communion, but some people who are not Orthodox occasionally approach the Chalice. A few months ago, I was waiting in line to pay for my purchases at the local Walgreen's. The man before me turned to me and began to loudly complain in front of all the people in line that I had denied him Communion. I told him that in our Church only faithful members of the Eastern Orthodox Church may receive the Eucharist if they have prepared by fasting, prayers and Confession.
When a new Priest is ordained, after the Anaphora, the Bishop puts the consecrated Lamb on a diskos and hands it to him saying something like, "You must guard and protect the Eucharist for you will be held accountable at the Last Judgment if you have knowingly given Communion to someone who is unworthy."

Fr. John W. Morris
I seem to recall Elijah Maria claiming a lot of intercommunion going on, but she couldn't give specific names, due to us "uncharitable" Orthodox.
I suspect that there are lone wolves out there doing this. (Not clergy, but rather laity. (I suspect that Eastern Catholic priests would give Communion to any Orthodox who came forward though....)

I would point out to a Byzantine or Roman Catholic friend that were they to receive Holy Communion at the hands of an Orthodox priest under false pretenses that I believe that per the theology of their Church and their Tradition that they likely have committed what their church defines as a 'mortal sin.' (Since their Church does not prohibit reception of Communion by non-Catholics, I suspect the act of receiving non-Catholic communion would not constitute a 'sin per se' in their view, but the act of lying (or an act of conscious omission by not being truthful in the first instance) to a member of the clergy of an Orthodox Church (which their Church has proclaimed to be a 'sister Church' (again their terms, not ours)  would in fact be a mortal sin requiring confession and absolution.

 

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podkarpatska said:
Iconodule said:
Just tell him he's eating and drinking his own condemnation and one day while he's on the john his guts are going to fall out. Then walk away.
Kinda harsh?? Don't ya think??? ;)
What is more important! The bruised feelings or the soul of the man who is about to have his guts falling out!
 

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Iconodule said:
Just tell him he's eating and drinking his own condemnation and one day while he's on the john his guts are going to fall out. Then walk away.
Our priest announces prior to giving out Communion, that ONLY Orthodox Faithful who have fasted, been to Confession are to come to Communion. Im sure that he is NOT the exception.  He will question anyone who he is not familiar with and has on many occasion, and in an understanding and compassionate way, refused Communion to those who do not meet the rules.  This fellow who claims he is receiving Communion in both faiths is only fooling himself and will be judged on that some day.  Communion, by it's very name connotes "Com" = with, "Union" = together, joined, as one.  This is not the case between Orthodoxy and Rome with her Eastern rite churches.
 

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JoeS2 said:
Iconodule said:
Just tell him he's eating and drinking his own condemnation and one day while he's on the john his guts are going to fall out. Then walk away.
Our priest announces prior to giving out Communion, that ONLY Orthodox Faithful who have fasted, been to Confession are to come to Communion. Im sure that he is NOT the exception.  He will question anyone who he is not familiar with and has on many occasion, and in an understanding and compassionate way, refused Communion to those who do not meet the rules.  This fellow who claims he is receiving Communion in both faiths is only fooling himself and will be judged on that some day.  Communion, by it's very name connotes "Com" = with, "Union" = together, joined, as one.  This is not the case between Orthodoxy and Rome with her Eastern rite churches.
We have a printed statement in the book rack of each pew stating the same thing. A person who received Communion under false pretenses is committing a very serious sin.

Fr. John W. Morris
 

PJ

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frjohnmorris said:
We have a printed statement in the book rack of each pew stating the same thing.
Interesting. Do Orthodox generally regard that as sufficient (as opposed to making an announcement, or even asking each communicant unless you already know them), or do opinions vary? (Question for you or anyone else.)
 
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Peter J said:
frjohnmorris said:
We have a printed statement in the book rack of each pew stating the same thing.
Interesting. Do Orthodox generally regard that as sufficient (as opposed to making an announcement, or even asking each communicant unless you already know them), or do opinions vary? (Question for you or anyone else.)
Our priest doesn't always announce it unless there are obvious guests present who might not know.  He did devote part of a sermon to it at one point.  He told people that by receiving communion they were essentially declaring themselves in agreement with all Orthodox teaching and declaring themselves Orthodox to the exclusion of all else.  I think this drove the point home to those who would receive anywhere and everywhere while claiming to be something else. 
 

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Peter J said:
frjohnmorris said:
We have a printed statement in the book rack of each pew stating the same thing.
Interesting. Do Orthodox generally regard that as sufficient (as opposed to making an announcement, or even asking each communicant unless you already know them), or do opinions vary? (Question for you or anyone else.)
If some one approaches the Chalice and I do not know them, I ask them if they are Orthodox and only give Communion to Orthodox.

Fr. John W. Morris
 

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One reason why, to my mind, requiring confession before every time you commune to be a good practice, so this isn't an issue.
 

Mor Ephrem

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TheMathematician said:
One reason why, to my mind, requiring confession before every time you commune to be a good practice, so this isn't an issue.
Why misuse one sacrament to protect another?  We could just as easily make the dismissal of the catechumens mean something by kicking out all those who are not baptised and chrismated Orthodox in good standing with the local bishop and prepared to commune at that particular Liturgy. 

Any takers? 
 

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Mor Ephrem said:
TheMathematician said:
One reason why, to my mind, requiring confession before every time you commune to be a good practice, so this isn't an issue.
Why misuse one sacrament to protect another?  We could just as easily make the dismissal of the catechumens mean something by kicking out all those who are not baptised and chrismated Orthodox in good standing with the local bishop and prepared to commune at that particular Liturgy. 

Any takers? 
I've heard the arguments on both sides of that, but still do not think that it, by default, leads to a misuse of Confession. I might have come off that way, and probably did, but was not my intention.
 

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TheMathematician said:
Mor Ephrem said:
TheMathematician said:
One reason why, to my mind, requiring confession before every time you commune to be a good practice, so this isn't an issue.
Why misuse one sacrament to protect another?  We could just as easily make the dismissal of the catechumens mean something by kicking out all those who are not baptised and chrismated Orthodox in good standing with the local bishop and prepared to commune at that particular Liturgy. 

Any takers? 
I've heard the arguments on both sides of that, but still do not think that it, by default, leads to a misuse of Confession. I might have come off that way, and probably did, but was not my intention.
Frequent communion is not the Serbian custom, but in parishes where it has become the custom over the past thirty years, it would be impracticable for the pastor to individually confess all of the faithful  each week. I think that we have to have faith in our priests and their pastoral prudence in terms of protecting the Eucharistic. In most cases where a non Orthodox is communed, that person is not programming the Gifts, but acting either out of ignorance or misplaced piety. A "warning" in the pew book or a simple announcement regarding who may receive should suffice.
 

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podkarpatska said:
TheMathematician said:
Mor Ephrem said:
TheMathematician said:
One reason why, to my mind, requiring confession before every time you commune to be a good practice, so this isn't an issue.
Why misuse one sacrament to protect another?  We could just as easily make the dismissal of the catechumens mean something by kicking out all those who are not baptised and chrismated Orthodox in good standing with the local bishop and prepared to commune at that particular Liturgy. 

Any takers? 
I've heard the arguments on both sides of that, but still do not think that it, by default, leads to a misuse of Confession. I might have come off that way, and probably did, but was not my intention.
Frequent communion is not the Serbian custom, but in parishes where it has become the custom over the past thirty years, it would be impracticable for the pastor to individually confess all of the faithful  each week. I think that we have to have faith in our priests and their pastoral prudence in terms of protecting the Eucharistic. In most cases where a non Orthodox is communed, that person is not programming the Gifts, but acting either out of ignorance or misplaced piety. A "warning" in the pew book or a simple announcement regarding who may receive should suffice.
Confess ALL the faithful EACH week?  What sins are these folks committing that all the parish would need confessing......Holy Smokes.
 

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podkarpatska said:
TheMathematician said:
Mor Ephrem said:
TheMathematician said:
One reason why, to my mind, requiring confession before every time you commune to be a good practice, so this isn't an issue.
Why misuse one sacrament to protect another?  We could just as easily make the dismissal of the catechumens mean something by kicking out all those who are not baptised and chrismated Orthodox in good standing with the local bishop and prepared to commune at that particular Liturgy. 

Any takers? 
I've heard the arguments on both sides of that, but still do not think that it, by default, leads to a misuse of Confession. I might have come off that way, and probably did, but was not my intention.
Frequent communion is not the Serbian custom, but in parishes where it has become the custom over the past thirty years, it would be impracticable for the pastor to individually confess all of the faithful  each week. I think that we have to have faith in our priests and their pastoral prudence in terms of protecting the Eucharistic. In most cases where a non Orthodox is communed, that person is not programming the Gifts, but acting either out of ignorance or misplaced piety. A "warning" in the pew book or a simple announcement regarding who may receive should suffice.
I see my pal, Mr. An Droid Correctall, decided that "profaning the Gifts" must mean "programming the Gifts." Another example of technology intended to simplify life actually making things more difficult. Sorry.
 

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podkarpatska said:
podkarpatska said:
TheMathematician said:
Mor Ephrem said:
TheMathematician said:
One reason why, to my mind, requiring confession before every time you commune to be a good practice, so this isn't an issue.
Why misuse one sacrament to protect another?  We could just as easily make the dismissal of the catechumens mean something by kicking out all those who are not baptised and chrismated Orthodox in good standing with the local bishop and prepared to commune at that particular Liturgy. 

Any takers? 
I've heard the arguments on both sides of that, but still do not think that it, by default, leads to a misuse of Confession. I might have come off that way, and probably did, but was not my intention.
Frequent communion is not the Serbian custom, but in parishes where it has become the custom over the past thirty years, it would be impracticable for the pastor to individually confess all of the faithful  each week. I think that we have to have faith in our priests and their pastoral prudence in terms of protecting the Eucharistic. In most cases where a non Orthodox is communed, that person is not programming the Gifts, but acting either out of ignorance or misplaced piety. A "warning" in the pew book or a simple announcement regarding who may receive should suffice.
I see my pal, Mr. An Droid Correctall, decided that "profaning the Gifts" must mean "programming the Gifts." Another example of technology intended to simplify life actually making things more difficult. Sorry.
Took me a minute or two but I did finally figure that out. Thanks for clarifying though.
 

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I don't know if this is the right place to ask it, but is there like a PR campaign going on in Catholic churches across the United States that states that Catholics are allowed to receive at Orthodox Churches and vice-versa? I have no problem explaining to people why I don't receive communion at a Catholic church or why I don't feel obliged to line up with the communicants and get a blessing from the priest. What I do take issue with is American Catholics telling me "we're all the same" and its only Orthodox prejudices that's why I say otherwise. The worst experience I've ever had with the idea of shared communion was when my two best friends had a temper tantrum during Divine Liturgy because they tried to go in line with me and I told them to sit back down and that they can get antidoro later. I got the same speech about how it's totally allowed, that we're all the same, what's most important is that we're not Protestant, and that it's prejudice against them. I'd like to know what gives.
 

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JoeS2 said:
podkarpatska said:
TheMathematician said:
Mor Ephrem said:
TheMathematician said:
One reason why, to my mind, requiring confession before every time you commune to be a good practice, so this isn't an issue.
Why misuse one sacrament to protect another?  We could just as easily make the dismissal of the catechumens mean something by kicking out all those who are not baptised and chrismated Orthodox in good standing with the local bishop and prepared to commune at that particular Liturgy. 

Any takers? 
I've heard the arguments on both sides of that, but still do not think that it, by default, leads to a misuse of Confession. I might have come off that way, and probably did, but was not my intention.
Frequent communion is not the Serbian custom, but in parishes where it has become the custom over the past thirty years, it would be impracticable for the pastor to individually confess all of the faithful  each week. I think that we have to have faith in our priests and their pastoral prudence in terms of protecting the Eucharistic. In most cases where a non Orthodox is communed, that person is not programming the Gifts, but acting either out of ignorance or misplaced piety. A "warning" in the pew book or a simple announcement regarding who may receive should suffice.
Confess ALL the faithful EACH week?  What sins are these folks committing that all the parish would need confessing......Holy Smokes.
I dunno, I probably sin enough each week that confession would be beneficial. I'm just a catechumen though, maybe I'll stop sinning once I am chrismated.  ;)
 

hecma925

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KostaC said:
I don't know if this is the right place to ask it, but is there like a PR campaign going on in Catholic churches across the United States that states that Catholics are allowed to receive at Orthodox Churches and vice-versa? I have no problem explaining to people why I don't receive communion at a Catholic church or why I don't feel obliged to line up with the communicants and get a blessing from the priest. What I do take issue with is American Catholics telling me "we're all the same" and its only Orthodox prejudices that's why I say otherwise. The worst experience I've ever had with the idea of shared communion was when my two best friends had a temper tantrum during Divine Liturgy because they tried to go in line with me and I told them to sit back down and that they can get antidoro later. I got the same speech about how it's totally allowed, that we're all the same, what's most important is that we're not Protestant, and that it's prejudice against them. I'd like to know what gives.
I don't know about a PR campaign, but it has been a common enough statement by some of the Catholics that I know.
 

AntoniousNikolas

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KostaC said:
I don't know if this is the right place to ask it, but is there like a PR campaign going on in Catholic churches across the United States that states that Catholics are allowed to receive at Orthodox Churches and vice-versa? I have no problem explaining to people why I don't receive communion at a Catholic church or why I don't feel obliged to line up with the communicants and get a blessing from the priest. What I do take issue with is American Catholics telling me "we're all the same" and its only Orthodox prejudices that's why I say otherwise. The worst experience I've ever had with the idea of shared communion was when my two best friends had a temper tantrum during Divine Liturgy because they tried to go in line with me and I told them to sit back down and that they can get antidoro later. I got the same speech about how it's totally allowed, that we're all the same, what's most important is that we're not Protestant, and that it's prejudice against them. I'd like to know what gives.
I  don't know if it's a PR campaign exactly, but I've witnessed similar episodes and heard the same sort of lines (that it's all blind and unnecessary prejudice on the Orthodox side).  For example, one time a Roman Catholic nun showed up at our church and got in line to receive.  Our priest told her politely that only baptized Orthodox Christians who have fasted, et cetera, can approach.  She told him that no, it was okay, both her bishop and the pope said it was okay for Roman Catholics to receive in Orthodox churches.  Our priest then had to explain - again, very politely - that neither her bishop nor the Catholic pope had any authority to decide who Orthodox priests should admit to the chalice.  She wasn't very happy.  I wonder how accurate her report was.  Is someone in authority telling Catholics that intercommunion is allowed outside of instances of economia?
 

TheTrisagion

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Antonious Nikolas said:
KostaC said:
I don't know if this is the right place to ask it, but is there like a PR campaign going on in Catholic churches across the United States that states that Catholics are allowed to receive at Orthodox Churches and vice-versa? I have no problem explaining to people why I don't receive communion at a Catholic church or why I don't feel obliged to line up with the communicants and get a blessing from the priest. What I do take issue with is American Catholics telling me "we're all the same" and its only Orthodox prejudices that's why I say otherwise. The worst experience I've ever had with the idea of shared communion was when my two best friends had a temper tantrum during Divine Liturgy because they tried to go in line with me and I told them to sit back down and that they can get antidoro later. I got the same speech about how it's totally allowed, that we're all the same, what's most important is that we're not Protestant, and that it's prejudice against them. I'd like to know what gives.
I  don't know if it's a PR campaign exactly, but I've witnessed similar episodes and heard the same sort of lines (that it's all blind and unnecessary prejudice on the Orthodox side).  For example, one time a Roman Catholic nun showed up at our church and got in line to receive.  Our priest told her politely that only baptized Orthodox Christians who have fasted, et cetera, can approach.  She told him that no, it was okay, both her bishop and the pope said it was okay for Roman Catholics to receive in Orthodox churches.  Our priest then had to explain - again, very politely - that neither her bishop nor the Catholic pope had any authority to decide who Orthodox priests should admit to the chalice.  She wasn't very happy.  I wonder how accurate her report was.  Is someone in authority telling Catholics that intercommunion is allowed outside of instances of economia?
Who argues with a priest in the communion line? That would just be weird.
 

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KostaC said:
I don't know if this is the right place to ask it, but is there like a PR campaign going on in Catholic churches across the United States that states that Catholics are allowed to receive at Orthodox Churches and vice-versa?
I know it might seem like there is such a "PR campaign"; but if you spend time around e.g. Anglicans I believe you will find much the same thing. That is to say, their church's position is that they may receive in Catholic or Orthodox churches, so many of them expect Catholic or Orthodox priests to give them communion.
 

podkarpatska

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TheTrisagion said:
Antonious Nikolas said:
KostaC said:
I don't know if this is the right place to ask it, but is there like a PR campaign going on in Catholic churches across the United States that states that Catholics are allowed to receive at Orthodox Churches and vice-versa? I have no problem explaining to people why I don't receive communion at a Catholic church or why I don't feel obliged to line up with the communicants and get a blessing from the priest. What I do take issue with is American Catholics telling me "we're all the same" and its only Orthodox prejudices that's why I say otherwise. The worst experience I've ever had with the idea of shared communion was when my two best friends had a temper tantrum during Divine Liturgy because they tried to go in line with me and I told them to sit back down and that they can get antidoro later. I got the same speech about how it's totally allowed, that we're all the same, what's most important is that we're not Protestant, and that it's prejudice against them. I'd like to know what gives.
I  don't know if it's a PR campaign exactly, but I've witnessed similar episodes and heard the same sort of lines (that it's all blind and unnecessary prejudice on the Orthodox side).  For example, one time a Roman Catholic nun showed up at our church and got in line to receive.  Our priest told her politely that only baptized Orthodox Christians who have fasted, et cetera, can approach.  She told him that no, it was okay, both her bishop and the pope said it was okay for Roman Catholics to receive in Orthodox churches.  Our priest then had to explain - again, very politely - that neither her bishop nor the Catholic pope had any authority to decide who Orthodox priests should admit to the chalice.  She wasn't very happy.  I wonder how accurate her report was.  Is someone in authority telling Catholics that intercommunion is allowed outside of instances of economia?
Who argues with a priest in the communion line? That would just be weird.
You'd be surprised. But sometimes the priest deserves it for being stupid. When my in-laws were alive, we would go to Church with them on Sundays, a parish in the same jurisdiction as my home parish. One year in early September, our youngest son's Godparents and their family were in town to visit their oldest son who was a freshman at college there. The dad was president of our parish council at home and the family was, and remains, active in the Orthodox church and our parish. They sat with us at Liturgy, clearly participated in the liturgy and were denied communion by the priest after stating they were Orthodox- even though we vouched for the family. Needless to say, the young man and his parents never stepped foot in that church for the rest of the time the boy was in college. (Good ending though, he and his wife and three kids are active in our parish and church school etc.. notwithstanding this incident. But not all folks recover as well....) I called the Bishop's office myself to complain about the behavior of the priest who is no longer in our jurisdiction - but, was transferred to another jurisdiction where he remains as a floating priest to this day.
 

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That is kind of a dumb move on the priest's part, but I probably still wouldn't stand there and argue with him. ISTM, that standing there arguing would take something away from the purpose of being there.
 
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