Our Brains Struggle to Process This Much Stress

Arachne

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In those early months, I, along with most of the rest of the country, was using “surge capacity” to operate, as Ann Masten, PhD, a psychologist and professor of child development at the University of Minnesota, calls it. Surge capacity is a collection of adaptive systems — mental and physical — that humans draw on for short-term survival in acutely stressful situations, such as natural disasters. But natural disasters occur over a short period, even if recovery is long. Pandemics are different — the disaster itself stretches out indefinitely.

“The pandemic has demonstrated both what we can do with surge capacity and the limits of surge capacity,” says Masten. When it’s depleted, it has to be renewed. But what happens when you struggle to renew it because the emergency phase has now become chronic?
 

PorphyriosK

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IMO the vast majority of the stress has been caused by the sensationalist media who love to play up the drama and be our collective fear mongering nannies. Making people feel like they're going to drop dead if they go outside, and not allowing a variety of medical opinions to be heard. If a doctor's message is one of doom and hopelessness, they are guaranteed coverage and enthusiastic media support. If they have a more positive outlook and seem hopeful about things improving, they are censored and deleted. There can only be one acceptable narrative (as usual). Sickening.
 
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