Random Postings

PeterTheAleut

Hypatos
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 8, 2006
Messages
37,280
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
48
Location
Portland, Oregon
SolEX01 said:
PeterTheAleut said:
Of course not!  I watched one NFL playoff game in the mid 80's that went to a second overtime because of that rule.  Very long game, since NFL overtime is no Kansas Plan.
Here is the aforementioned game:

The New York Jets were largely in control of this game, and after a Freeman McNeil 25 yard touchdown, giving the Jets a 20-10 lead with 4:14 left in the game, the "Dog pound" in Cleveland Stadium became a dour place.
In a January 2, 1987 article, the New York Times identified Mark Gastineau as "the Jet who must make the big play on defense." On the Browns next drive, Gastineau did made the big play - a roughing the passer penalty on 3 and 24; a costly penalty, giving the Browns a valuable first down. Browns Quarterback Bernie Kosar turned that opportunity into a 68-yard scoring drive.
The Jets went three-and-out in their next possession, setting up a final drive for the Browns. With seven seconds left in regulation, a 37-yard pass play from Kosar to Receiver Webster Slaughter set up the game tying field goal by Mark Moseley.
After the Jets punted on their first overtime possession, the Browns drove to the Jets' 5 yard line, where despite the apparent sure victory, Moseley missed a 23-yarder wide right.
After a series of punts shared between the teams, Kosar again led the Browns on a 60-yard drive, ending the game two minutes, two seconds into the second overtime on a 27-yard field goal.
In that game, Kosar set post season records for completions, attempts, and passing yards.
Source

Besides the 2008 Baltimore Ravens, has a team ever lost in the same year to teams quarterbacked by brothers?  So, a team would have to lose to the Indianapolis Colts (QB'ed by Peyton Manning) and the New York Giants (QB'ed by Eli Manning) in the same year?
When was the last time a pair of brothers QB'ed different NFL teams at the same time?

I find it interesting that the Giants ran the ball down the throats (200+ yards rushing) of the best rush defense in the NFL.
 

SolEX01

Toumarches
Joined
Apr 22, 2008
Messages
13,747
Reaction score
0
Points
36
Location
Central Maryland
Website
www.goarch.org
PeterTheAleut said:
When was the last time a pair of brothers QB'ed different NFL teams at the same time?
The San Antonio sports column only reports 6 pairs of brothers ever playing QB in the NFL.

"Only six other pairs of brothers have played quarterback in the league since it formed in the 1920s, and none of those duos have even come close to matching the Detmers' combined longevity. Ty broke into the league with Green Bay in 1992 after a Heisman Trophy-winning career at BYU, and Koy joined him in Philadelphia five years later after starring at Colorado."

PeterTheAleut said:
I find it interesting that the Giants ran the ball down the throats (200+ yards rushing) of the best rush defense in the NFL.
Ravens don't talk as much trash under their new coach and the Giants took exception to the trash coming out of Ray Lewis' mouth.  He's past his prime and the Ravens paid the price.  In consolation, the Ravens have gone 29 games without giving up a 100 yard rusher.
 

PeterTheAleut

Hypatos
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 8, 2006
Messages
37,280
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
48
Location
Portland, Oregon
Jakub said:
NFL needs to adopt the NCAAF OT format...
Kansas Plan, right?  At least that would fix the problem of a team NEVER getting the ball (and the chance to score) during an overtime period because they lost the coin toss.
 

SolEX01

Toumarches
Joined
Apr 22, 2008
Messages
13,747
Reaction score
0
Points
36
Location
Central Maryland
Website
www.goarch.org
Sudden death is the NFL going back to the 1958 Championship Game.

Golf tournaments end in sudden death playoffs.  I have no problem with the NFL keeping sudden death.  After all, the losing team had 60 the same 60 minutes to do something as the winning team.

TV obligations prevent the NFL from playing multiple regular season OTs.  In playoff season, all bets are off.  ;D
 

PeterTheAleut

Hypatos
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 8, 2006
Messages
37,280
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
48
Location
Portland, Oregon
SolEX01 said:
Golf tournaments end in sudden death playoffs.
But each of the contestants in the overtime period has the same opportunity to score without the other trying to keep him FROM scoring.  Your golf example is actually more like the example of using extra innings to decide a baseball game--each team has the same opportunity to score (albeit, against an opponent hellbent on keeping them from scoring).
 

SolEX01

Toumarches
Joined
Apr 22, 2008
Messages
13,747
Reaction score
0
Points
36
Location
Central Maryland
Website
www.goarch.org
A golfer and a relief pitcher face the same stress in extra inning situations.

With football, both teams physically beat each other up for 60 minutes.  If they've reached a tie and have to play overtime, the team that doesn't get the ball failed in preventing the other team from scoring.  Why do they need to be rewarded with one more chance?

In college, ties were more common before the OT rule was implemented.  OT was implemented more for the BCS than anything else and College is supposedly a fairer environment than the cutthroat NFL.
 

PeterTheAleut

Hypatos
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 8, 2006
Messages
37,280
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
48
Location
Portland, Oregon
SolEX01 said:
With football, both teams physically beat each other up for 60 minutes.  If they've reached a tie and have to play overtime, the team that doesn't get the ball failed in preventing the other team from scoring.  Why do they need to be rewarded with one more chance?
That's the problem.  They didn't get an equitable chance to begin with, so how can you reward them with one more of what they never had:  possession of the ball with the chance to score?

In college, ties were more common before the OT rule was implemented.
Of course ties were more common before OT.  After OT was implemented, teams would play as many OT's as were needed to finally crown a winner, thus rendering ties virtually impossible.  I think the NCAA Div. I-A record for most overtimes is seven (Arkansas 58, Ole Miss 56 (14-14 after regulation), on 11/03/2001; and Arkansas 71, Kentucky 63 (24-24 after regulation) on 11/01/2003; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Overtime_(sports)#North_American_sports).

OT was implemented more for the BCS than anything else
Then how do you explain NCAA Division II & III games going to overtime, as well?  They actually use playoffs to determine their national champs.

and College is supposedly a fairer environment than the cutthroat NFL.
A good argument for implementing the Kansas Plan for NFL overtimes. ;)
 

chris

Taxiarches
Site Supporter
Joined
Oct 5, 2002
Messages
7,253
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
57
All I know is....my Bengals actually managed to not lose.

A tie will make our 2008 season highlight reel, I'm afraid!
 

SolEX01

Toumarches
Joined
Apr 22, 2008
Messages
13,747
Reaction score
0
Points
36
Location
Central Maryland
Website
www.goarch.org
PeterTheAleut said:
That's the problem.  They didn't get an equitable chance to begin with, so how can you reward them with one more of what they never had:  possession of the ball with the chance to score?
Think of the ancient duel as the analogy - the guy who gets shot usually doesn't get another chance to fire back at the shooter.

PeterTheAleut said:
Of course ties were more common before OT.  After OT was implemented, teams would play as many OT's as were needed to finally crown a winner, thus rendering ties virtually impossible.  I think the NCAA Div. I-A record for most overtimes is seven.
Ask the NFL Players Union if they want to play in 7 untimed OT's and 5 hour games like College.

PeterTheAleut said:
Then how do you explain NCAA Division II & III games going to overtime, as well?  They actually use playoffs to determine their national champs.
An equitable OT is OK on the college level.  Sudden death OT in college could result in fan riots.  ;)
 

PeterTheAleut

Hypatos
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 8, 2006
Messages
37,280
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
48
Location
Portland, Oregon
SolEX01 said:
PeterTheAleut said:
That's the problem.  They didn't get an equitable chance to begin with, so how can you reward them with one more of what they never had:  possession of the ball with the chance to score?
Think of the ancient duel as the analogy - the guy who gets shot usually doesn't get another chance to fire back at the shooter.
But the goal of a football team--I HOPE :eek:--is NOT to kill their opponent.

PeterTheAleut said:
Of course ties were more common before OT.  After OT was implemented, teams would play as many OT's as were needed to finally crown a winner, thus rendering ties virtually impossible.  I think the NCAA Div. I-A record for most overtimes is seven.
Ask the NFL Players Union if they want to play in 7 untimed OT's and 5 hour games like College.
Ask the college players who actually played those games if THEY wanted to play in 7 untimed OT's stretching the game to 5 hours!

PeterTheAleut said:
Then how do you explain NCAA Division II & III games going to overtime, as well?  They actually use playoffs to determine their national champs.
An equitable OT is OK on the college level.  Sudden death OT in college could result in fan riots.   ;)
Then why is it not OK for the Pros?
 

SolEX01

Toumarches
Joined
Apr 22, 2008
Messages
13,747
Reaction score
0
Points
36
Location
Central Maryland
Website
www.goarch.org
Think of the NFL as the modern day incarnation of gladiatorial combat.

One combatant struck a mortal blow to the other combatant.  Did the other combatant usually have an equitable chance to strike back before death or disability?

Same thing exists in NFL.  If one team scores first in sudden death, that is equivalent to striking the fatal blow which renders the other team unable to come back.

College Football is more dependent on TV Revenue than the NFL.  Long games are in the best interests of college football.  The College Players don't seem to mind even though they receive nothing besides an athletic scholarship.  Meanwhile, NFL Players make a lot of money and can accept the rules of sudden death football.

 

Demetrios G.

Protokentarchos
Site Supporter
Joined
May 24, 2006
Messages
4,821
Reaction score
0
Points
36
Location
wilderness
SolEX01 said:
Think of the NFL as the modern day incarnation of gladiatorial combat.

One combatant struck a mortal blow to the other combatant.  Did the other combatant usually have an equitable chance to strike back before death or disability?

Same thing exists in NFL.  If one team scores first in sudden death, that is equivalent to striking the fatal blow which renders the other team unable to come back.

College Football is more dependent on TV Revenue than the NFL.  Long games are in the best interests of college football.  The College Players don't seem to mind even though they receive nothing besides an athletic scholarship.  Meanwhile, NFL Players make a lot of money and can accept the rules of sudden death football.
I'd like to see them trough a few tigers in the arena after the game. I wonder what that would do to the salary cap?
 

Rastaman

Protokentarchos
Site Supporter
Joined
Dec 20, 2005
Messages
3,535
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
32
Location
Alberta, Canada
PeterTheAleut said:
Jakub said:
Australian Rules Football is real football...
Is that the same thing as Rugby?  Talk about a violent sport! :eek:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TiGoqObb0YQ&feature=related

Rugby is for the boys who can't handle Aussie Rules....
 

SolEX01

Toumarches
Joined
Apr 22, 2008
Messages
13,747
Reaction score
0
Points
36
Location
Central Maryland
Website
www.goarch.org
I was nearly beat up during an indoor floor hockey game by some law student many, many years ago.  My teammate almost started a fight with the law student because the law student had me pinned into a corner.  I was OK.
 
Top