Random Postings

Asteriktos

Hypatos
Joined
Oct 4, 2002
Messages
39,082
Reaction score
26
Points
48
Age
41
Mystery of life #439,623... why is it that the water in the pot that is heating on the stove seems like it's the perfect temperature, yet when I pour the water into my cup of hot chocolate mix, it suddenly becomes scalding hot, so that I can't drink it for 15 minutes?
 

Ortho_cat

Protokentarchos
Joined
Jun 29, 2009
Messages
5,392
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
38
Location
Wichita, KS
Asteriktos said:
Mystery of life #439,623... why is it that the water in the pot that is heating on the stove seems like it's the perfect temperature, yet when I pour the water into my cup of hot chocolate mix, it suddenly becomes scalding hot, so that I can't drink it for 15 minutes?
Did you taste the water from the pot, or did u just touch it? Also, are u using an enclosed container (i.e. lid on top of the cup)? What kind of cup are you using?
 

Asteriktos

Hypatos
Joined
Oct 4, 2002
Messages
39,082
Reaction score
26
Points
48
Age
41
Ortho_cat said:
Asteriktos said:
Mystery of life #439,623... why is it that the water in the pot that is heating on the stove seems like it's the perfect temperature, yet when I pour the water into my cup of hot chocolate mix, it suddenly becomes scalding hot, so that I can't drink it for 15 minutes?
Did you taste the water from the pot, or did u just touch it? Also, are u using an enclosed container (i.e. lid on top of the cup)? What kind of cup are you using?
I used a spoon to taste the water out of the pot, and before it came to a boil I poured the water into a tall blue plastic cup/glass (no lid). Stir the hot chocolate and... POOF, to hot to drink (too hot for me, anyway)  :angel:
 

Ortho_cat

Protokentarchos
Joined
Jun 29, 2009
Messages
5,392
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
38
Location
Wichita, KS
Asteriktos said:
Ortho_cat said:
Asteriktos said:
Mystery of life #439,623... why is it that the water in the pot that is heating on the stove seems like it's the perfect temperature, yet when I pour the water into my cup of hot chocolate mix, it suddenly becomes scalding hot, so that I can't drink it for 15 minutes?
Did you taste the water from the pot, or did u just touch it? Also, are u using an enclosed container (i.e. lid on top of the cup)? What kind of cup are you using?
I used a spoon to taste the water out of the pot, and before it came to a boil I poured the water into a tall blue plastic cup/glass (no lid). Stir the hot chocolate and... POOF, to hot to drink (too hot for me, anyway)  :angel:
The spoon (metal) conducts heat better thn the plastic cup, so the spoon absorbs more of the energy from the water, lowering the avg. temp of the water in the spoon relative to that in the cup.

Also, I believe that since the volume of water in the cup is greater than that in the spoon, the average temperature of the water in the cup is higher than that in the spoon since the former contains more energy (as temperature is a measurement of the average kinetic energy of the molecules)

So I think it's a combination of these.

edit: I had a bunch of other stupid ideas, but i think these are most likely correct (or close to it).

 

Asteriktos

Hypatos
Joined
Oct 4, 2002
Messages
39,082
Reaction score
26
Points
48
Age
41
Ortho_cat said:
Asteriktos said:
Ortho_cat said:
Asteriktos said:
Mystery of life #439,623... why is it that the water in the pot that is heating on the stove seems like it's the perfect temperature, yet when I pour the water into my cup of hot chocolate mix, it suddenly becomes scalding hot, so that I can't drink it for 15 minutes?
Did you taste the water from the pot, or did u just touch it? Also, are u using an enclosed container (i.e. lid on top of the cup)? What kind of cup are you using?
I used a spoon to taste the water out of the pot, and before it came to a boil I poured the water into a tall blue plastic cup/glass (no lid). Stir the hot chocolate and... POOF, to hot to drink (too hot for me, anyway)  :angel:
The spoon (metal) conducts heat better thn the plastic cup, so the spoon absorbs more of the energy from the water, lowering the avg. temp of the water in the spoon relative to that in the cup.

Also, I believe that since the volume of water in the cup is greater than that in the spoon, the average temperature of the water in the cup is higher than that in the spoon since the former contains more energy (as temperature is a measurement of the average kinetic energy of the molecules)

So I think it's a combination of these.

edit: I had a bunch of other stupid ideas, but i think these are most likely correct (or close to it).
Interesting, thanks :)
 

mike

Protostrator
Joined
Sep 14, 2008
Messages
24,873
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
29
Location
Białystok / Warsaw
Ortho_cat said:
Asteriktos said:
I used a spoon to taste the water out of the pot, and before it came to a boil I poured the water into a tall blue plastic cup/glass (no lid). Stir the hot chocolate and... POOF, to hot to drink (too hot for me, anyway)  :angel:
The spoon (metal) conducts heat better thn the plastic cup, so the spoon absorbs more of the energy from the water, lowering the avg. temp of the water in the spoon relative to that in the cup.

Also, I believe that since the volume of water in the cup is greater than that in the spoon, the average temperature of the water in the cup is higher than that in the spoon since the former contains more energy (as temperature is a measurement of the average kinetic energy of the molecules)

So I think it's a combination of these.

edit: I had a bunch of other stupid ideas, but i think these are most likely correct (or close to it).
I don't agree with the second one thought. If it were true every substance in bigger container would have higher temperature than in the smaller one. I would add the bigger area:mass ratio in the spoon than in the cup (the greater area, the faster energy transfers).
 

Asteriktos

Hypatos
Joined
Oct 4, 2002
Messages
39,082
Reaction score
26
Points
48
Age
41
So I take a bus out to go and get some groceries this morning (I sold my car in December, whole other story). I'm half way through the check out and it dawns on me... I'm buying way too much, and there's no way I can take all this stuff home on a public bus. So I call a cab--which is gonna cost me an extra $8, but what can I do? So my cab finally arrives... and it is... a bus!?  :D  What the heck? Usually they send, you know, a cab. A car cab. I can just put my packages in the trunk and were off. But not today--today they had to send a bus! When you tell them that you want picked up at a grocery store, shouldn't they assume that you're gonna have a bunch of bags of groceries?  ::)  ;D
 

minasoliman

Stratopedarches
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
May 24, 2004
Messages
20,198
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Location
NJ
did that bus cost as much as the cab?
 

Asteriktos

Hypatos
Joined
Oct 4, 2002
Messages
39,082
Reaction score
26
Points
48
Age
41
Lol, same price. It was just a small bus with the cab's logo on the side. Cost me $9 (+ tip) to get home either way.
 

minasoliman

Stratopedarches
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
May 24, 2004
Messages
20,198
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Location
NJ
Asteriktos said:
Lol, same price. It was just a small bus with the cab's logo on the side. Cost me $9 (+ tip) to get home either way.
geez...you think there's common courtesy to make it a little cheaper
 

Ortho_cat

Protokentarchos
Joined
Jun 29, 2009
Messages
5,392
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
38
Location
Wichita, KS
Michał Kalina said:
Ortho_cat said:
Asteriktos said:
I used a spoon to taste the water out of the pot, and before it came to a boil I poured the water into a tall blue plastic cup/glass (no lid). Stir the hot chocolate and... POOF, to hot to drink (too hot for me, anyway)  :angel:
The spoon (metal) conducts heat better thn the plastic cup, so the spoon absorbs more of the energy from the water, lowering the avg. temp of the water in the spoon relative to that in the cup.

Also, I believe that since the volume of water in the cup is greater than that in the spoon, the average temperature of the water in the cup is higher than that in the spoon since the former contains more energy (as temperature is a measurement of the average kinetic energy of the molecules)

So I think it's a combination of these.

edit: I had a bunch of other stupid ideas, but i think these are most likely correct (or close to it).
I don't agree with the second one thought. If it were true every substance in bigger container would have higher temperature than in the smaller one. I would add the bigger area:mass ratio in the spoon than in the cup (the greater area, the faster energy transfers).
Ya, i might be off on that one now that i think about it.
 

chrevbel

High Elder
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 11, 2008
Messages
708
Reaction score
0
Points
0
biro said:
Is there an ignore button on this board?
Be careful.  I asked that question once and never got an answer.  Crushed, I was.
 
Top