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Americans have a tendency to try to "standardise" the pronunciation of English with little regard for etymological quirks and the like. I say, we should all just accept that English is inconistent and there is often little clue in the spelling of a word as to how it should pronounced.

Dictionary.com, while not the most reputable source, lists buh-nal, -nahl, beyn-l as acceptable.

Anyway, I have only ever heard buh-NAHL, never BEYN-l.
 

Asteriktos

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akimori makoto said:
Americans have a tendency to try to "standardise" the pronunciation of English with little regard for etymological quirks and the like. I say, we should all just accept that English is inconistent and there is often little clue in the spelling of a word as to how it should pronounced.

Dictionary.com, while not the most reputable source, lists buh-nal, -nahl, beyn-l as acceptable.

Anyway, I have only ever heard buh-NAHL, never BEYN-l.
Next is leisure (long e sound) vs. leisure (rhymes with measure)  ;D
 

ZealousZeal

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I am going to have to re-take my road test. I can't believe it.

It's mostly my fault because of my procrastination, but I'm going to blame it on Ohio's stupid laws. Long story short: my current license is out-of-state, and I have to take Ohio's written exam before they'll issue me an Ohio license. Fine. BUT, my New Mexico license expires tomorrow- and of course, is nowhere to be found. So, when I go to take my written test tomorrow, if I don't have it to show them, they can't waive the road test. So unless I can persuade the nice lady at the examination station to let me pull up my driving record on the NM DMV's website (for a fee of $6) to prove I'm licensed (which is not likely), I will have to re-take the damned test. In most other states (in my experience, anyway), your license has to be expired for 4-5 years before they'll make you take the road test again... but nooooooooooo. Not Ohio.

It would be hilarious if it weren't happening to me.  :-\

/Rant
 

That person

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I can confirm that getting a driver's license in Ohio is a serious hassle.
 

ZealousZeal

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That person said:
I can confirm that getting a driver's license in Ohio is a serious hassle.
You don't happen to work at a State Highway Patrol Examination Station, do you?  ;D
 

vamrat

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akimori makoto said:
Americans have a tendency to try to "standardise" the pronunciation of English with little regard for etymological quirks and the like. I say, we should all just accept that English is inconistent and there is often little clue in the spelling of a word as to how it should pronounced.

Dictionary.com, while not the most reputable source, lists buh-nal, -nahl, beyn-l as acceptable.

Anyway, I have only ever heard buh-NAHL, never BEYN-l.
We are all going to have to agree that English spoken in different parts of the world are in fact different languages.  Like Chinese, they are still written the same, but spoken entirely differently.  I've never heard buh-NAHL, always pronounced it BEYN-l!
 

ironchapman

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vamrat said:
akimori makoto said:
Americans have a tendency to try to "standardise" the pronunciation of English with little regard for etymological quirks and the like. I say, we should all just accept that English is inconistent and there is often little clue in the spelling of a word as to how it should pronounced.

Dictionary.com, while not the most reputable source, lists buh-nal, -nahl, beyn-l as acceptable.

Anyway, I have only ever heard buh-NAHL, never BEYN-l.
We are all going to have to agree that English spoken in different parts of the world are in fact different languages.  Like Chinese, they are still written the same, but spoken entirely differently.  I've never heard buh-NAHL, always pronounced it BEYN-l!
I posed the pronunciation question on my Twitter account. Every response I got back was the "beyn-l/bay-nul" version.
 
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ironchapman said:
vamrat said:
akimori makoto said:
Americans have a tendency to try to "standardise" the pronunciation of English with little regard for etymological quirks and the like. I say, we should all just accept that English is inconistent and there is often little clue in the spelling of a word as to how it should pronounced.

Dictionary.com, while not the most reputable source, lists buh-nal, -nahl, beyn-l as acceptable.

Anyway, I have only ever heard buh-NAHL, never BEYN-l.
We are all going to have to agree that English spoken in different parts of the world are in fact different languages.  Like Chinese, they are still written the same, but spoken entirely differently.  I've never heard buh-NAHL, always pronounced it BEYN-l!
I posed the pronunciation question on my Twitter account. Every response I got back was the "beyn-l/bay-nul" version.
The real question is, how do you pronounce aluminium?
 

ironchapman

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akimori makoto said:
ironchapman said:
vamrat said:
akimori makoto said:
Americans have a tendency to try to "standardise" the pronunciation of English with little regard for etymological quirks and the like. I say, we should all just accept that English is inconistent and there is often little clue in the spelling of a word as to how it should pronounced.

Dictionary.com, while not the most reputable source, lists buh-nal, -nahl, beyn-l as acceptable.

Anyway, I have only ever heard buh-NAHL, never BEYN-l.
We are all going to have to agree that English spoken in different parts of the world are in fact different languages.  Like Chinese, they are still written the same, but spoken entirely differently.  I've never heard buh-NAHL, always pronounced it BEYN-l!
I posed the pronunciation question on my Twitter account. Every response I got back was the "beyn-l/bay-nul" version.
The real question is, how do you pronounce aluminium?
Al-loo-min-um. We spell it aluminum. No second i here.
 

vamrat

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PeterTheAleut said:
Asteriktos said:
Banal... what is your chosen pronunciation of it? Bah-nall or Bay-nul?
What a banal question you ask us. ;)

Personally, I prefer BAY-nul, because it rhymes with anal.
Interestingly enough, our reasons are the same!
 
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ironchapman said:
akimori makoto said:
ironchapman said:
vamrat said:
akimori makoto said:
Americans have a tendency to try to "standardise" the pronunciation of English with little regard for etymological quirks and the like. I say, we should all just accept that English is inconistent and there is often little clue in the spelling of a word as to how it should pronounced.

Dictionary.com, while not the most reputable source, lists buh-nal, -nahl, beyn-l as acceptable.

Anyway, I have only ever heard buh-NAHL, never BEYN-l.
We are all going to have to agree that English spoken in different parts of the world are in fact different languages.  Like Chinese, they are still written the same, but spoken entirely differently.  I've never heard buh-NAHL, always pronounced it BEYN-l!
I posed the pronunciation question on my Twitter account. Every response I got back was the "beyn-l/bay-nul" version.
The real question is, how do you pronounce aluminium?
Al-loo-min-um. We spell it aluminum. No second i here.
Just like radum, calcum, beryllum and potassum?
 

ironchapman

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akimori makoto said:
ironchapman said:
akimori makoto said:
ironchapman said:
vamrat said:
akimori makoto said:
Americans have a tendency to try to "standardise" the pronunciation of English with little regard for etymological quirks and the like. I say, we should all just accept that English is inconistent and there is often little clue in the spelling of a word as to how it should pronounced.

Dictionary.com, while not the most reputable source, lists buh-nal, -nahl, beyn-l as acceptable.

Anyway, I have only ever heard buh-NAHL, never BEYN-l.
We are all going to have to agree that English spoken in different parts of the world are in fact different languages.  Like Chinese, they are still written the same, but spoken entirely differently.  I've never heard buh-NAHL, always pronounced it BEYN-l!
I posed the pronunciation question on my Twitter account. Every response I got back was the "beyn-l/bay-nul" version.
The real question is, how do you pronounce aluminium?
Al-loo-min-um. We spell it aluminum. No second i here.
Just like radum, calcum, beryllum and potassum?
More like centre and center or programme and program. Just a regional spelling variation.

Or, from Webster's Dictionary here and here.

Is this some sort of sticking point for you? Sounds sort of like it.
 
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ironchapman said:
akimori makoto said:
ironchapman said:
akimori makoto said:
ironchapman said:
vamrat said:
akimori makoto said:
Americans have a tendency to try to "standardise" the pronunciation of English with little regard for etymological quirks and the like. I say, we should all just accept that English is inconistent and there is often little clue in the spelling of a word as to how it should pronounced.

Dictionary.com, while not the most reputable source, lists buh-nal, -nahl, beyn-l as acceptable.

Anyway, I have only ever heard buh-NAHL, never BEYN-l.
We are all going to have to agree that English spoken in different parts of the world are in fact different languages.  Like Chinese, they are still written the same, but spoken entirely differently.  I've never heard buh-NAHL, always pronounced it BEYN-l!
I posed the pronunciation question on my Twitter account. Every response I got back was the "beyn-l/bay-nul" version.
The real question is, how do you pronounce aluminium?
Al-loo-min-um. We spell it aluminum. No second i here.
Just like radum, calcum, beryllum and potassum?
More like centre and center or programme and program. Just a regional spelling variation.

Or, from Webster's Dictionary here and here.

Is this some sort of sticking point for you? Sounds sort of like it.
It doesn't upset me, I just think it sounds funny, as immature as that might be.

Whichever side is more "correct", I'm not sure that adding or removing an entire syllable from a word counts as a "regional spelling variation"!

I just read this on wikipedia, which I found interesting:

wikipedia said:
"Two variants of the metal's name are in current use, aluminium and aluminum (besides the obsolete alumium). The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) adopted aluminium as the standard international name for the element in 1990 but, three years later, recognized aluminum as an acceptable variant. Hence their periodic table includes both.[59] IUPAC prefers the use of aluminium in its internal publications, although nearly as many IUPAC publications use the spelling aluminum.[60]

Most countries use the spelling aluminium. In the United States, the spelling aluminum predominates.[14][61] The Canadian Oxford Dictionary prefers aluminum, whereas the Australian Macquarie Dictionary prefers aluminium. In 1926, the American Chemical Society officially decided to use aluminum in its publications; American dictionaries typically label the spelling aluminium as a British variant.

The name aluminium derives from its status as a base of alum. It is borrowed from Old French; its ultimate source, alumen, in turn is a Latin word that literally means "bitter salt".[62]

The earliest citation given in the Oxford English Dictionary for any word used as a name for this element is alumium, which British chemist and inventor Humphry Davy employed in 1808 for the metal he was trying to isolate electrolytically from the mineral alumina. The citation is from the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London: "Had I been so fortunate as to have obtained more certain evidences on this subject, and to have procured the metallic substances I was in search of, I should have proposed for them the names of silicium, alumium, zirconium, and glucium."[63][64]

Davy settled on aluminum by the time he published his 1812 book Chemical Philosophy: "This substance appears to contain a peculiar metal, but as yet Aluminum has not been obtained in a perfectly free state, though alloys of it with other metalline substances have been procured sufficiently distinct to indicate the probable nature of alumina."[65] But the same year, an anonymous contributor to the Quarterly Review, a British political-literary journal, in a review of Davy's book, objected to aluminum and proposed the name aluminium, "for so we shall take the liberty of writing the word, in preference to aluminum, which has a less classical sound."[66]
The -ium suffix conformed to the precedent set in other newly discovered elements of the time: potassium, sodium, magnesium, calcium, and strontium (all of which Davy isolated himself). Nevertheless, -um spellings for elements were not unknown at the time, as for example platinum, known to Europeans since the 16th century, molybdenum, discovered in 1778, and tantalum, discovered in 1802. The -um suffix is consistent with the universal spelling alumina for the oxide, as lanthana is the oxide of lanthanum, and magnesia, ceria, and thoria are the oxides of magnesium, cerium, and thorium respectively.

The spelling used throughout the 19th century by most U.S. chemists was aluminium, but common usage is less clear.[67] The aluminum spelling is used in the Webster's Dictionary of 1828. In his advertising handbill for his new electrolytic method of producing the metal 1892, Charles Martin Hall used the -um spelling, despite his constant use of the -ium spelling in all the patents[57] he filed between 1886 and 1903.[68] It has consequently been suggested that the spelling reflects an easier to pronounce word with one fewer syllable, or that the spelling on the flier was a mistake. Hall's domination of production of the metal ensured that the spelling aluminum became the standard in North America; the Webster Unabridged Dictionary of 1913, though, continued to use the -ium version.
 

Papist

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Asteriktos said:
Papist said:
Asteriktos said:
Papist said:
Asteriktos said:
Papist said:
So the tax refund will pay for my tuition this summer!!! :) Gonna take two courses: 1. Epistemology, 2. The Philosophy of Human Nature.

Also, this Fall I will begin my Latin courses. :)
Out of curiosity, what type of course on epistemology? I mean, are you going to have an overview type thing, or more like exploring one particular view in depth?
The first half of the course will be an overview of different thinkers and topics in epistemology. The second half will focus on Thomistic realism and Thomistic responses to non-realisits.
Hmm, well, enjoy, I suppose :)
Haha, I know not quite your cup of tea. :)
Maybe. I don't know. Hmm. Well why not? Who knows. Wait, wut? I'm so confused! Or is it confuzzled? Anyway, carry on then  :)
I know. I don't know that I know, but I know. I only need to know. ;)
 

ironchapman

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akimori makoto said:
ironchapman said:
akimori makoto said:
ironchapman said:
akimori makoto said:
ironchapman said:
vamrat said:
akimori makoto said:
Americans have a tendency to try to "standardise" the pronunciation of English with little regard for etymological quirks and the like. I say, we should all just accept that English is inconistent and there is often little clue in the spelling of a word as to how it should pronounced.

Dictionary.com, while not the most reputable source, lists buh-nal, -nahl, beyn-l as acceptable.

Anyway, I have only ever heard buh-NAHL, never BEYN-l.
We are all going to have to agree that English spoken in different parts of the world are in fact different languages.  Like Chinese, they are still written the same, but spoken entirely differently.  I've never heard buh-NAHL, always pronounced it BEYN-l!
I posed the pronunciation question on my Twitter account. Every response I got back was the "beyn-l/bay-nul" version.
The real question is, how do you pronounce aluminium?
Al-loo-min-um. We spell it aluminum. No second i here.
Just like radum, calcum, beryllum and potassum?
More like centre and center or programme and program. Just a regional spelling variation.

Or, from Webster's Dictionary here and here.

Is this some sort of sticking point for you? Sounds sort of like it.
It doesn't upset me, I just think it sounds funny, as immature as that might be.

Whichever side is more "correct", I'm not sure that adding or removing an entire syllable from a word counts as a "regional spelling variation"!
I think you get my point about the variation stuff.

In any case, on the subject of immaturity, I always thought "aluminium" sounded rather effeminate. :p
 
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