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celticfan1888

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christian7777 said:
celticfan1888 said:
Sucks being stuck somewhere between Norwegian and American. I was born and spent the first 12 years of my life in Norway, but spent the past 9.5 in America. Should I get American citizenship or keep my Norwegian? Decisions, decisions.
That is a tough one. Which country do you enjoy more, and are you better at English or Norwegian?
I enjoy both, and I am about equally fluent in both. I speak Norwegian better, but write English a little better.

With me getting married and all, I will probably be stuck in the USA anyway, so I might as well be able to vote and run for mayor right? lol
 

Alpo

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celticfan1888 said:
christian7777 said:
celticfan1888 said:
Sucks being stuck somewhere between Norwegian and American. I was born and spent the first 12 years of my life in Norway, but spent the past 9.5 in America. Should I get American citizenship or keep my Norwegian? Decisions, decisions.
That is a tough one. Which country do you enjoy more, and are you better at English or Norwegian?
I enjoy both, and I am about equally fluent in both. I speak Norwegian better, but write English a little better.

With me getting married and all, I will probably be stuck in the USA anyway, so I might as well be able to vote and run for mayor right? lol
While as a fellow Scandinavian ( ;) ) I understand that there must be a strong link between your Norwegian identity and being a citizen of Norway and that it's not an easy decision to discard it especially since you don't live in Norway you could always consider yourself as a Norwegian even if you discarded bureaucratic citizenship of Norway. National identieties are after all about people and their cultures and not about bureaucracy. :)
 

celticfan1888

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Alpo said:
celticfan1888 said:
christian7777 said:
celticfan1888 said:
Sucks being stuck somewhere between Norwegian and American. I was born and spent the first 12 years of my life in Norway, but spent the past 9.5 in America. Should I get American citizenship or keep my Norwegian? Decisions, decisions.
That is a tough one. Which country do you enjoy more, and are you better at English or Norwegian?
I enjoy both, and I am about equally fluent in both. I speak Norwegian better, but write English a little better.

With me getting married and all, I will probably be stuck in the USA anyway, so I might as well be able to vote and run for mayor right? lol
While as a fellow Scandinavian ( ;) ) I understand that there must be a strong link between your Norwegian identity and being a citizen of Norway and that it's not an easy decision to discard it especially since you don't live in Norway you could always consider yourself as a Norwegian even if you discarded bureaucratic citizenship of Norway. National identieties are after all about people and their cultures and not about bureaucracy. :)
That is true, I just worry sometimes on if I will regret it at some point. There are advantages and disadvantages to both. With a US citizenship, it is easier for me to find a job in the States, and I don't have to renew a visa. But, what if my children want to find work in Europe? If I give up my Norwegian citizenship, will they still be able to get it through ancestry? I also find it easier for footballing if I keep my Norwegian (but that isn't as important as my guaranteed professor position). I guess I need to make a pros/cons list.
 

montalo

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celticfan1888 said:
Alpo said:
celticfan1888 said:
christian7777 said:
celticfan1888 said:
Sucks being stuck somewhere between Norwegian and American. I was born and spent the first 12 years of my life in Norway, but spent the past 9.5 in America. Should I get American citizenship or keep my Norwegian? Decisions, decisions.
That is a tough one. Which country do you enjoy more, and are you better at English or Norwegian?
I enjoy both, and I am about equally fluent in both. I speak Norwegian better, but write English a little better.

With me getting married and all, I will probably be stuck in the USA anyway, so I might as well be able to vote and run for mayor right? lol
While as a fellow Scandinavian ( ;) ) I understand that there must be a strong link between your Norwegian identity and being a citizen of Norway and that it's not an easy decision to discard it especially since you don't live in Norway you could always consider yourself as a Norwegian even if you discarded bureaucratic citizenship of Norway. National identieties are after all about people and their cultures and not about bureaucracy. :)
That is true, I just worry sometimes on if I will regret it at some point. There are advantages and disadvantages to both. With a US citizenship, it is easier for me to find a job in the States, and I don't have to renew a visa. But, what if my children want to find work in Europe? If I give up my Norwegian citizenship, will they still be able to get it through ancestry? I also find it easier for footballing if I keep my Norwegian (but that isn't as important as my guaranteed professor position). I guess I need to make a pros/cons list.
A different question. If you DO give it up, hpw easy would it be for you to get it back later?
 

Gorazd

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Norway is the best country in the world (and I am saying that in spite of having Swedish family)! What are the advantages of the US? I dont see any at all. If I were you, I'd return to Norway and get my master's degree for free there. In the US, you always need to pay for everything (education, health care) etc. in addition to taxes, so it sums up to be much more than in Norway. And there are no fjords and fjells.

As for getting married: if you ever have children, the Norwegian day care system just doesnt have an equivalent in the US.
 

Orthodox11

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celticfan1888 said:
Norway does not allow dual citizenship. =/
They do for children of mixed parents. If one of your parents is an American citizen and the other a Norwegian citizen, I think it should be possible for you to have both.

Gorazd said:
Norway is the best country in the world (and I am saying that in spite of having Swedish family)!
:-*
 

Alpo

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Gorazd said:
In the US, you always need to pay for everything (education, health care) etc. in addition to taxes
There's no such thing as free education or health care. We pay for them through relatively high taxes.
 
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celticfan1888 said:
christian7777 said:
celticfan1888 said:
Sucks being stuck somewhere between Norwegian and American. I was born and spent the first 12 years of my life in Norway, but spent the past 9.5 in America. Should I get American citizenship or keep my Norwegian? Decisions, decisions.
That is a tough one. Which country do you enjoy more, and are you better at English or Norwegian?
I enjoy both, and I am about equally fluent in both. I speak Norwegian better, but write English a little better.

With me getting married and all, I will probably be stuck in the USA anyway, so I might as well be able to vote and run for mayor right? lol
Perhaps. :D
 

celticfan1888

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Gorazd said:
Norway is the best country in the world (and I am saying that in spite of having Swedish family)! What are the advantages of the US? I dont see any at all. If I were you, I'd return to Norway and get my master's degree for free there. In the US, you always need to pay for everything (education, health care) etc. in addition to taxes, so it sums up to be much more than in Norway. And there are no fjords and fjells.

As for getting married: if you ever have children, the Norwegian day care system just doesnt have an equivalent in the US.
But the taxes. o_O
 

JamesR

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So guys I have a question. Is this animal cruelty? Me and my baby sister are allergic to cats, and our neighbors are crazy cat people whose cats roam all over the neighborhood and reproduce constantly. They are ALWAYS going in our backyard, passing through, crapping on our lawn etc. One time they even ate my pet dove I had out there. My father has told the neighbor about this several times but there is nothing they can really do about it. So, now whenever I see one of their cats in my yard I shoot it with my dad's 1250fps pellet rifle.
 

vamrat

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JamesR said:
So guys I have a question. Is this animal cruelty? Me and my baby sister are allergic to cats, and our neighbors are crazy cat people whose cats roam all over the neighborhood and reproduce constantly. They are ALWAYS going in our backyard, passing through, crapping on our lawn etc. One time they even ate my pet dove I had out there. My father has told the neighbor about this several times but there is nothing they can really do about it. So, now whenever I see one of their cats in my yard I shoot it with my dad's 1250fps pellet rifle.
Do you try to kill it or just wound it?  IMHO wounding severely would be cruel.  A couple pumps on a small rifle and a quick shot to the bum won't cause lasting damage and is more a warning than anything else, so not really cruel.  Likewise, killing quick and painlessly isn't what I would consider cruel either, unless you consider using mousetraps or exterminating cockroaches to be cruel as well.  Pests are pests.

Personally, I am a cat-liker so would only shoot one if it was terrorizing an animal I wanted around.  Since one ate your dove, I can see where you'd consider then pests.
 

vamrat

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Vamrat has officially met a Bishop for the first time ever.  Many thanks to Bishop Basil of the Antiochian church for his visit and for his blessing!
 

JamesR

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vamrat said:
JamesR said:
So guys I have a question. Is this animal cruelty? Me and my baby sister are allergic to cats, and our neighbors are crazy cat people whose cats roam all over the neighborhood and reproduce constantly. They are ALWAYS going in our backyard, passing through, crapping on our lawn etc. One time they even ate my pet dove I had out there. My father has told the neighbor about this several times but there is nothing they can really do about it. So, now whenever I see one of their cats in my yard I shoot it with my dad's 1250fps pellet rifle.
Do you try to kill it or just wound it?  IMHO wounding severely would be cruel.  A couple pumps on a small rifle and a quick shot to the bum won't cause lasting damage and is more a warning than anything else, so not really cruel.  Likewise, killing quick and painlessly isn't what I would consider cruel either, unless you consider using mousetraps or exterminating cockroaches to be cruel as well.  Pests are pests.

Personally, I am a cat-liker so would only shoot one if it was terrorizing an animal I wanted around.  Since one ate your dove, I can see where you'd consider then pests.
To be honest, I usually shoot to kill, since 1250fps is a pretty powerful gun for a cat and leaving it wounded would probably be cruel and leave it to die a slow painful death.
 
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