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celticfan1888

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The English language has certainly been a heavy influence on many languages around the world – including modern Norwegian. Thanks to ‘internationalisation’ from the Internet, TV and film, Norwegians frequently use words like baby, drink, cool, jeans, web and chips – to name a few.

But once upon a time it was the other way around. Many English words actually come from old Norse language – brought by Vikings to England in medieval times. Here are some words you have probably uttered without realizing you are speaking Norwegian!

    Anger – from angr (“trouble, affliction”)
    Bag – from baggi. Norwegians use the word bag today but, ironically, with an English pronounciation. The word has actually been re-imported from English!
    Berserk – from berserkr (“bare shirt”). Fierce warriors who fought without armour (and ate magic mushrooms for courage).
    Crawl – from krafla (“to claw”).
    Dirt – from drit (“feces”).
    Gun – from gunn (“war, battle”)
    Hell – from Hel, the ruler of the Underworld in Norse mythology.
    Hit – from hitta (“find”). Another example of a re-imported word.
    Husband – from husbondi (“master of the house”).
    Knife – from kniv, kvifr. You may have guessed this one already. In fact, any word starting with kn- is probably from old Norse.
    Raft – from raptr (“log”). Today we use the (English) word rafting in Norway when talking about the popular sport.
    Reindeer – from hreindyri. In modern Norwegian: reinsdyr.
    Scare – from skirra (“to frighten”).
    Steak – from steik, steikja (“to cook, roast”). Curiously, the word steak house is common in Norway today.
    Town – from tun, referring to the open space between buildings.
    Ugly – from uggligr (“dreadful”).
 

Asteriktos

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celticfan1888 said:
Many English words actually come from old Norse language –
I couldn't help but notice that most of those words are negative in some way (violent, etc.) ...  :police: 8)
 
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Asteriktos said:
celticfan1888 said:
Many English words actually come from old Norse language –
I couldn't help but notice that most of those words are negative in some way (violent, etc.) ...  :police: 8)
That's true for quite a few English words of Old Norse origin; cut, die, drown, ugly, etc. :)
 

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celticfan1888 said:
In fact, any word starting with kn- is probably from old Norse.
No, that's stretching a bit too far. Kn- is just as likely to come from Old English (for instance knight) as Old Norse - it's a pretty common sound in Saxon derived languages (Anglo-Saxon, Old Saxon), though in Old English they usually wrote it Cn-.

James
 

celticfan1888

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jmbejdl said:
celticfan1888 said:
In fact, any word starting with kn- is probably from old Norse.
No, that's stretching a bit too far. Kn- is just as likely to come from Old English (for instance knight) as Old Norse - it's a pretty common sound in Saxon derived languages (Anglo-Saxon, Old Saxon), though in Old English they usually wrote it Cn-.

James
From the 9th century, Old English experienced heavy influence from Old Norse.
 

jmbejdl

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celticfan1888 said:
jmbejdl said:
celticfan1888 said:
In fact, any word starting with kn- is probably from old Norse.
No, that's stretching a bit too far. Kn- is just as likely to come from Old English (for instance knight) as Old Norse - it's a pretty common sound in Saxon derived languages (Anglo-Saxon, Old Saxon), though in Old English they usually wrote it Cn-.

James
From the 9th century, Old English experienced heavy influence from Old Norse.
Never said it didn't. It's just pushing a bit too far to assume kn- is an indicator of Norse origin over Saxon. Of course, Old Saxon and Old Norse would have been rubbing up against one another back in Europe as well as in Britain (and this would continue on well into the middle ages, just look at the greeting 'moin moin' that followed the Hanse all around the Baltic - it's Plattdeutsch, descended from Old Saxon, yet my Danish niece uses it) so it's probably pretty hard to completely disentangle the two, but it remains a fact that kn- is a common sound in Saxon as well as Norse.

James
 

augustin717

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JorgenThorbjørnsen said:
augustin717 said:
Perhaps it's a bit personal, but how's the Ecumenical Patriarchate part of the Swedish culture you want to preserve?
You obviously don't know the history of Christianity in my nation.
Oh yeah, the barbarian lands. Forgot about it. But more seriously it's Lutheranism, and before it Roman Catholicism that's  "the history of Christianity in your nation."
 

JorgenThorbjørnsen

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augustin717 said:
JorgenThorbjørnsen said:
augustin717 said:
Perhaps it's a bit personal, but how's the Ecumenical Patriarchate part of the Swedish culture you want to preserve?
You obviously don't know the history of Christianity in my nation.
Oh yeah, the barbarian lands. Forgot about it. But more seriously it's Lutheranism, and before it Roman Catholicism that's  "the history of Christianity in your nation."
No... Scandinavia was Orthodox before the schism...and several years after, and under the Ecumenical Patriarchate.

Varangian Guard. Take a history class.

http://orthodoxwiki.org/Olaf_of_Norway
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Varangian_Guard
 

augustin717

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JorgenThorbjørnsen said:
augustin717 said:
JorgenThorbjørnsen said:
augustin717 said:
Perhaps it's a bit personal, but how's the Ecumenical Patriarchate part of the Swedish culture you want to preserve?
You obviously don't know the history of Christianity in my nation.
Oh yeah, the barbarian lands. Forgot about it. But more seriously it's Lutheranism, and before it Roman Catholicism that's  "the history of Christianity in your nation."
No... Scandinavia was Orthodox before the schism...and several years after, and under the Ecumenical Patriarchate.

Varangian Guard. Take a history class.
So were the Balkans under the pope . Nerds can find that in some history books. Now how's that related to the living culture of Sweeden you want to preserve from whatever, africans etc?
 

JorgenThorbjørnsen

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augustin717 said:
So were the Balkans under the pope . Nerds can find that in some history books. Now how's that related to the living culture of Sweeden you want to preserve from whatever, africans etc?
What are you blabbering about the Balkans and the Pope?

It isn't related to the culture of Sweden. Because I never talked about, or even brought up religion. You did. So you need to explain, not me.
 

augustin717

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JorgenThorbjørnsen said:
augustin717 said:
So were the Balkans under the pope . Nerds can find that in some history books. Now how's that related to the living culture of Sweeden you want to preserve from whatever, africans etc?
What are you blabbering about the Balkans and the Pope?

It isn't related to the culture of Sweden. Because I never talked about, or even brought up religion. You did. So you need to explain, not me.
You were adamant that immigrants from Africa or Asia, I dunno, were going to alter Swedish culture in irreversibly because of their own different culture.  I only found it funny that some Swedish guy that joined a Greek church nine seas away, would be the one to complain about i. I myself have nothing but respect for Scandinavians, just don't see the Greek  religion as part of their culture.
 

celticfan1888

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augustin717 said:
JorgenThorbjørnsen said:
augustin717 said:
So were the Balkans under the pope . Nerds can find that in some history books. Now how's that related to the living culture of Sweeden you want to preserve from whatever, africans etc?
What are you blabbering about the Balkans and the Pope?

It isn't related to the culture of Sweden. Because I never talked about, or even brought up religion. You did. So you need to explain, not me.
You were adamant that immigrants from Africa or Asia, I dunno, were going to alter Swedish culture in irreversibly because of their own different culture.  I only found it funny that some Swedish guy that joined a Greek church nine seas away, would be the one to complain about i. I myself have nothing but respect for Scandinavians, just don't see the Greek  religion as part of their culture.
Scandinavian culture is exactly that, Scandinavian.

Orthodoxy is not Greek. If you think it is, you are a heretic.
 

celticfan1888

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From a UDI annual report for 2011:

9,900 people were granted their first residence permit to work in Norway.

86% of applications were approved. Nationals of Romania, India and Bulgaria were granted the highest number of permits to work in Norway.

Most immigrants come to work in agriculture and fish-processing, industry or commerce, and the hotel and restaurant industry.

In addition, 36,900 EEA nationals registered as employees, jobseekers, self-employed persons or service providers.

http://www.udi.no/Norwegian-Directorate-of-Immigration/Annual-Report-2011/Work-and-residence/How-many-people-came-here-to-work/

 
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