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Sin Through Political Voting

David 2007

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I have a query and it relates to a lot of things I am personally concerned and conflicted about.

Is voting morally and sin neutral?

Can I vote for someone to be in Government and wipe my hands of it?

Say I vote for a President and then he does things like crimes against humanity? and I know this, but then I vote him in again?

Or after he's left office I vote for his party again. The same people who participated in crimes against God and Humanity.

Am I morally held accountable for supporting a person like this?

or can I just wipe my hands and pretend like I have no part in the crimes?

 
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In my opinion, it all has to do with intentions. If your intentions are to help the people of your country and you believe that he's the one that can do it in the best possible way, by all means vote for him. Then again, you have to consider his stance on Christianity. If he's the best one overall, but his works are against everything Christianity teaches, I wouldn't vote for him. Sometimes I think whether Jesus would approve of what is happening and decide on that.

Also, if someone one votes for performs crimes against humanity, I would seriously never vote for him again, since that would go against my intentions, but this is my opinion.
 

JimCBrooklyn

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Dimitrios-Georgios said:
In my opinion, it all has to do with intentions. If your intentions are to help the people of your country and you believe that he's the one that can do it in the best possible way, by all means vote for him.
I would tend to agree with that, though I suppose I would also say that we as Christians have the added responsibility of becoming as objectively informed as we can be, so as to not cast poor votes with good intentions.

I also think that, at least in my own personal case, while many in the political realm gag a bit at the idea, it's important not to take off my faith "goggles" when it comes to voting. My love for Christ should really define everything about me, and as such how could I ever cast any vote without considering it, i.e., vote for someone that I believe is "good for the country" in an abstract secular sense, without considering the Christian implications.
 
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JimCBrooklyn said:
[...]
I would also say that we as Christians have the added responsibility of becoming as objectively informed as we can be, so as to not cast poor votes with good intentions.
I agree, though in my mind this responsibility applies to everyone who is eligible to vote or decide on their country's political situation, so I apologize for not clarifying that.
 
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I would argue that you are morally accountable because you're voicing support and providing support for a corrupt government. For instance, can you vote for a candidate who has proven to bring about economic prosperity if, on the other hand, he is committed to pro-choice or actions that protect genocidal dictators? Ethically, you are voicing support for those actions by voting for him.

Of course, all of this is contingent upon you having knowledge; but as the old saying goes, "Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me." From an ethical standpoint, this rings true - if you had no idea that a candidate would act in an immoral manner, then you are not morally culpable. If, however, you knew he would act in a certain way, then you are guilty of helping to put that leader into place.

Now, to respond to the inevitable objection, I admit that this means at times you will not vote. But not casting a vote is still a vote of no confidence in the candidates presented.

So it does come down to how you embrace morality. If you look at it deontologically and say that all morals are equal, then you can probably never vote. If you look at morality through a hierarchy or another standard that says some things are more moral than others, then you evaluate your options.
 

Keble

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No, because then one has to deal with the legitimacy of revolution.
 

Shanghaiski

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Keble said:
No, because then one has to deal with the legitimacy of revolution.
If one is transitioning from republic to autocratic monarchy (or even constitutional for that matter), one can make a good argument for theological legitimacy of revolution.
 

kh31

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I see some opinions on voting for someone based on their stance on Christianity. What if that person was totally dedicated to some other religion that espoused many christian moral values, but made no bones about not believing in Christ or heaven. For example, what if they were a devout and very public Buddhist?

I guess my second question would be - what if someone else spoke a belief in christianity and even publicly supported and defended the church, yet was very corrupt in their actions. Which should we more support, the Moral Buddhist or the corrupt Christian and why?

I am Orthodox by the way. I pose the question this way because it's too easy to dismiss some immoral pagan. What about a corrupt person who nontheless is a supporter of the church? I'm really just curious.

KH31
 

myrrhbear

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What bothers me about voting for instance, for a president, is that even if you think he is good for the country generally, what if he is not pro-life? (I value the life issue above all others.) As president he can "choose" federal judges or a supreme court judge who could be a tipping vote to allow issues you believe are un-Christian: partial birth abortion, or any life issue. A judge like that can affect our lives for many years beyond a presidential term. Then I think if I have voted for that president I will be held accountable to God for the innocent lives taken, having known while voting that it could possibly happen.
 
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