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Standing for the Gospel Reading in ECUSA churches

scamandrius

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I have no idea if this particular phenomenon is just in Episcopalian churches here in the USA or not.  Growing up Lutheran, whenever the Gospel was read, regardless of whether it was a Vespers, a Matins, a Liturgy with or without communion, we stood.  The school where I teach used to be an Episcopal Church though that connection was severed back in the 1970s.  Despite that, we still retain  a chaplain and have a chapel service every Tuesday though it is a very non-denominational, very watered down service of any kind.  We always have a reading from the Scripture.  Regardless of whether it is from the OT, the Epistles, or the Gospel, we are instructed by the priest to sit.  I asked him why and he said that you only rise for the Gospel during a Eucharistic celebration.  I found this quite odd.  Is this really the standard? 
 

Alpha60

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scamandrius said:
I have no idea if this particular phenomenon is just in Episcopalian churches here in the USA or not.  Growing up Lutheran, whenever the Gospel was read, regardless of whether it was a Vespers, a Matins, a Liturgy with or without communion, we stood.  The school where I teach used to be an Episcopal Church though that connection was severed back in the 1970s.  Despite that, we still retain  a chaplain and have a chapel service every Tuesday though it is a very non-denominational, very watered down service of any kind.  We always have a reading from the Scripture.  Regardless of whether it is from the OT, the Epistles, or the Gospel, we are instructed by the priest to sit.  I asked him why and he said that you only rise for the Gospel during a Eucharistic celebration.  I found this quite odd.  Is this really the standard?
Its unheard of in any apostolic church to sit for the Gospel, but the Western and to a large extent the contemporary Eastern custom is to remain seated for the rest.  This is useful in the Coptic Church where there are five separate lessons plus the homily and repeated reading of the Gospel in the Agpeya.
 

JTLoganville

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In contemporary Lutheran, Anglican, and Episcopal practice one stands for the Gospel only during a Eucharistic celebration. 

At the prayer offices the choice of readings from the Daily Lectionary is left to the the officiant, so there may or may not be a reading from the Gospels.

What confuses the matter is that there are some parishes and other setting in which the service is not a prayer office per se but essentially the liturgy of the Word from the Eucharist without a celebration of the Eucharist/Communion.  When such is the "order of service" then the custom is to stand for the Gospel as though the Eucharist was being celebrated.

 

Alpha60

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JTLoganville said:
In contemporary Lutheran, Anglican, and Episcopal practice one stands for the Gospel only during a Eucharistic celebration. 

At the prayer offices the choice of readings from the Daily Lectionary is left to the the officiant, so there may or may not be a reading from the Gospels.

What confuses the matter is that there are some parishes and other setting in which the service is not a prayer office per se but essentially the liturgy of the Word from the Eucharist without a celebration of the Eucharist/Communion.  When such is the "order of service" then the custom is to stand for the Gospel as though the Eucharist was being celebrated.
Not standing for the Gospel during Mattins and Evensong but only during the Eucharist is so inconsistent and self-contradictory as to be almost as quintessentially Anglican as a tippet, a vicarage,  or a gin and tonic.
 

JTLoganville

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Alpha60 said:
Not standing for the Gospel during Mattins and Evensong but only during the Eucharist is so inconsistent and self-contradictory as to be almost as quintessentially Anglican as a tippet, a vicarage,  or a gin and tonic.
Or as quintessentially Lutheran as a Synod President and beer and bratwurst.
 

scamandrius

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JTLoganville said:
In contemporary Lutheran, Anglican, and Episcopal practice one stands for the Gospel only during a Eucharistic celebration. 

At the prayer offices the choice of readings from the Daily Lectionary is left to the the officiant, so there may or may not be a reading from the Gospels.

What confuses the matter is that there are some parishes and other setting in which the service is not a prayer office per se but essentially the liturgy of the Word from the Eucharist without a celebration of the Eucharist/Communion.  When such is the "order of service" then the custom is to stand for the Gospel as though the Eucharist was being celebrated.
I grew up Lutheran.  I cannot remember a time, any time, when the Gospel was read and people remained seated.  Unless that's an ELCA phenomenon, which wouldn't surprise me.
 

JTLoganville

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scamandrius said:
I grew up Lutheran.  I cannot remember a time, any time, when the Gospel was read and people remained seated.  Unless that's an ELCA phenomenon, which wouldn't surprise me.
The pew editions of the 1978 Lutheran Book of Worship (LBW) which predates the ELCA by a decade indicates in red that the congregation is to sit for the lessons during Matins and Vespers but stand for the "Gospel Canticle" which follows the final reading.  At Matins it is the canticle of Zechariah ("Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel...") and at Vespers it is the Magnificat.

The LBW was replaced by  Evangelical Lutheran Worship in 2007.  The directions for sitting during the lessons continue in the new book.

 

scamandrius

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The ELCA was founded in 1978 so the LWB is cobtemporaneous with it.
 

Deacon Lance

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scamandrius said:
The ELCA was founded in 1978 so the LWB is cobtemporaneous with it.
The ELCA was founded 1/1/88.  I think you were thinking of the AELC which was founded in 1976.
 

ialmisry

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scamandrius said:
JTLoganville said:
In contemporary Lutheran, Anglican, and Episcopal practice one stands for the Gospel only during a Eucharistic celebration. 

At the prayer offices the choice of readings from the Daily Lectionary is left to the the officiant, so there may or may not be a reading from the Gospels.

What confuses the matter is that there are some parishes and other setting in which the service is not a prayer office per se but essentially the liturgy of the Word from the Eucharist without a celebration of the Eucharist/Communion.  When such is the "order of service" then the custom is to stand for the Gospel as though the Eucharist was being celebrated.
I grew up Lutheran.  I cannot remember a time, any time, when the Gospel was read and people remained seated.  Unless that's an ELCA phenomenon, which wouldn't surprise me.
Ditto
 

JTLoganville

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ialmisry said:
scamandrius said:
I grew up Lutheran.  I cannot remember a time, any time, when the Gospel was read and people remained seated.  Unless that's an ELCA phenomenon, which wouldn't surprise me.
Ditto
I'm not surprised, as very few Lutheran congregations use Matins or Vespers on a regular basis.
 
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