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Synodikon of Orthodoxy

MarkosC

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Three questions:

- which liturgical book contains the Synodikon of Orthodoxy?

- Does anyone have [a link to?] the text of current official Synodikon used by the Ecumenical Patriarchate?   Greek is fine, though a translation also works.

- are there differences between the one used by the Ecumenical Patriarchate and with the Moscow, Antioch, Jerusalem or Alexandrian Patriarchates?
[Serbs, Bulgarians, Romanians etc. - if your patriarchates have differences, I'd be curious, though my main focus is Moscow and Antioch/Jerusalem/Antioch]

Thanks!
 

LBK

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To get you started:

http://www.anastasis.org.uk/synodikon.htm

http://www.anastasis.org.uk/canon_of_the_synodikon.htm
 

Iconodule

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Another version: http://www.johnsanidopoulos.com/2010/02/synodicon-of-orthodoxy.html

Unfortunately John Sanidopoulos doesn't remember where he found this one!
 

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I was told today it is only performed by bishops. On the other hand I think I remember attending one celebrated by a presbyter. Can anyone explain?
 

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Michał Kalina said:
I was told today it is only performed by bishops. On the other hand I think I remember attending one celebrated by a presbyter. Can anyone explain?
Last year there was a bishop in my parish and the Synodikon was done. Today there has no been any bishop, so the parson (the rector) just has read one general prayer from it and after this the choir has sung Te Deum and Preserve, O God, the Holy Orthodox Faith. So maybe that's true, that the full rite can be done only by bishop...  ???
 

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Dominika said:
Michał Kalina said:
I was told today it is only performed by bishops. On the other hand I think I remember attending one celebrated by a presbyter. Can anyone explain?
Last year there was a bishop in my parish and the Synodikon was done. Today there has no been any bishop, so the parson (the rector) just has read one general prayer from it and after this the choir has sung Te Deum and Preserve, O God, the Holy Orthodox Faith. So maybe that's true, that the full rite can be done only by bishop...  ???
It's my understanding that the Synodikon, in the Great Russian practice, is only done when a hierarch serves. Otherwise, the Great Prokeimenon is sung, "Who is so great a God as our God..." followed by the affirmation of the Nicene Creed and the final statement of the 7th Council, stating, "This is the Faith of our Fathers, this is the Faith of the Orthodox...this is the Faith that hath established the universe!!"

But, if a bishop is present, he blesses the people with the dikiri and trikiri for each "Memory eternal!" and turns them upside down for each "Anathema!"
 

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Benjamin the Red said:
Dominika said:
Michał Kalina said:
I was told today it is only performed by bishops. On the other hand I think I remember attending one celebrated by a presbyter. Can anyone explain?
Last year there was a bishop in my parish and the Synodikon was done. Today there has no been any bishop, so the parson (the rector) just has read one general prayer from it and after this the choir has sung Te Deum and Preserve, O God, the Holy Orthodox Faith. So maybe that's true, that the full rite can be done only by bishop...  ???
It's my understanding that the Synodikon, in the Great Russian practice, is only done when a hierarch serves. Otherwise, the Great Prokeimenon is sung, "Who is so great a God as our God..." followed by the affirmation of the Nicene Creed and the final statement of the 7th Council, stating, "This is the Faith of our Fathers, this is the Faith of the Orthodox...this is the Faith that hath established the universe!!"
We had nothing. Just a regular DL (if you ignore it's St. Basil's).
 

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Michał Kalina said:
Benjamin the Red said:
Dominika said:
Michał Kalina said:
I was told today it is only performed by bishops. On the other hand I think I remember attending one celebrated by a presbyter. Can anyone explain?
Last year there was a bishop in my parish and the Synodikon was done. Today there has no been any bishop, so the parson (the rector) just has read one general prayer from it and after this the choir has sung Te Deum and Preserve, O God, the Holy Orthodox Faith. So maybe that's true, that the full rite can be done only by bishop...  ???
It's my understanding that the Synodikon, in the Great Russian practice, is only done when a hierarch serves. Otherwise, the Great Prokeimenon is sung, "Who is so great a God as our God..." followed by the affirmation of the Nicene Creed and the final statement of the 7th Council, stating, "This is the Faith of our Fathers, this is the Faith of the Orthodox...this is the Faith that hath established the universe!!"
We had nothing. Just a regular DL (if you ignore it's St. Basil's).
We inserted this with a procession of icons into the Liturgy, but I've been to other parishes that instead perform what I described above at Vespers on Sunday evening.
 

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Benjamin the Red said:
Michał Kalina said:
Benjamin the Red said:
Dominika said:
Michał Kalina said:
I was told today it is only performed by bishops. On the other hand I think I remember attending one celebrated by a presbyter. Can anyone explain?
Last year there was a bishop in my parish and the Synodikon was done. Today there has no been any bishop, so the parson (the rector) just has read one general prayer from it and after this the choir has sung Te Deum and Preserve, O God, the Holy Orthodox Faith. So maybe that's true, that the full rite can be done only by bishop...  ???
It's my understanding that the Synodikon, in the Great Russian practice, is only done when a hierarch serves. Otherwise, the Great Prokeimenon is sung, "Who is so great a God as our God..." followed by the affirmation of the Nicene Creed and the final statement of the 7th Council, stating, "This is the Faith of our Fathers, this is the Faith of the Orthodox...this is the Faith that hath established the universe!!"
We had nothing. Just a regular DL (if you ignore it's St. Basil's).
We inserted this with a procession of icons into the Liturgy, but I've been to other parishes that instead perform what I described above at Vespers on Sunday evening.
Your priest was at my parish for vespers.
 

Dominika

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Benjamin the Red said:
Michał Kalina said:
I've never heard about that procession thing done here.
I think the US has some...unique...Sunday of Orthodoxy customs.
It's not any particular American Orthodox custom.

Pictures of the procession with icons and recording (second one) of the Synodikon done this year in Kruševac in Serbia:
http://www.eparhijakrusevacka.com/вести/Света-Литургија-и-Литија-у-Недељу-Православља.html

An <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y2NlUYyvOHw">here</a> you can watch a video of these ceremonies

And a <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnMmEKHZm5w">video</a> from Greece
 

Second Chance

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What may be uniquely American on the Sunday of Orthodoxy is the getting together of bishops and/or priests and their congregations from different jurisdictions. This is done to (a) affirm that they consider each other to be canonical and/or (b) demonstrate that, despite their Protestant-like fragmentation, they are in truth part of the same Church.
 

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Some years ago, I've seen the Orthodoxy Sunday procession and the reading of the Synodikon done at Vatopaidi with no bishop present. From what I gather from the pictures taken this year, they've done it again that way (Abbot Ephrem wears a bishop-like mantyia):

 

Source
 

ialmisry

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MarkosC said:
Three questions:

- which liturgical book contains the Synodikon of Orthodoxy?

- Does anyone have [a link to?] the text of current official Synodikon used by the Ecumenical Patriarchate?   Greek is fine, though a translation also works.

- are there differences between the one used by the Ecumenical Patriarchate and with the Moscow, Antioch, Jerusalem or Alexandrian Patriarchates?
[Serbs, Bulgarians, Romanians etc. - if your patriarchates have differences, I'd be curious, though my main focus is Moscow and Antioch/Jerusalem/Antioch]

Thanks!
I haven't noticed any difference between the way the OCA and the Antiochians in North America do it.  I've been to Pan-Orthodox celebrations (this year I missed it, it was on Saturday night instead of Sunday for some reason) with EP, Antioch, Moscow, Romania, Serbia and the OCA represented (including by bishops), and no one seems to comment on any differences.
 

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Supposedly in ROCOR we add denunciations of the "pan-heresy of ecumenism," or "false ecumenism," or something like that. But I don't think all our bishops add those phrases when they do the synodikon.

In the Western Rite, there exists a Synodikon (called, however, the Great Anathema) which is to be done on the First Sunday of Lent by priests in their parishes. Interesting East-West parallel.
 

Dominika

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The procession done this year on the vigil of the Sunday of Orthodoxy in Bucharest:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LA_8Q7A0omE#t=9m46s

It reminds me a bit the Ways of the Cross which are done in the streets of Poland on the last Friday of the Great Lent or on Good Friday (depending on the parish)
 

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MarkosC said:
which liturgical book contains the Synodikon of Orthodoxy?
Traditionally, the Triodion.  I have seen Greek editions of the Triodion that include the Synodicon of Orthodoxy. 
However, Bishop Kallistos Ware omitted the Synodikon of Orthodoxy in his English translation of the Triodion. 

MarkosC said:
Does anyone have [a link to?] the text of current official Synodikon used by the Ecumenical Patriarchate?   Greek is fine, though a translation also works.
The most complete English translation of which I am aware was published by Holy Transfiguration Monastery of Boston in the Spring of 2000 in a special double issue of The True Vine (Issue Numbers 27 & 28). 

MarkosC said:
are there differences between the one used by the Ecumenical Patriarchate and with the Moscow, Antioch, Jerusalem or Alexandrian Patriarchates? ... if ... have differences, I'd be curious ...
I have not looked into this detail. 
I doubt the coincidence that an Old Calendarist Synod happens to have published the most complete edition available in English. 

In my opinion, this document is not well known by English speakers precisely to keep English speaking people from questioning their synods' compliance with what it says. The Synodicon of Orthodoxy was omitted from Bishop Kallistos Ware's English translation of the Triodion because it names and anathematizes heresies as well as names Saints who have followed the truth.  If parishioners knew and understood the implications of the contents of the Synodikon of Orthodoxy, then many synods would have a lot to explain.
 

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Iconodule said:
Another version: http://www.johnsanidopoulos.com/2010/02/synodicon-of-orthodoxy.html

Unfortunately John Sanidopoulos doesn't remember where he found this one!
Maybe from here:

http://preachersinstitute.com/2011/03/11/the-synodikon-of-orthodoxy/
 

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Holy Transfiguration Monastery of Boston plans to publish an English edition of the Triodion which would include the Synodicon of Orthodoxy in the same book.  Although it looks like that may be a while, judging by its place in their tentative publishing schedule:
http://www.htmp.org/publications-home.html
 

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Synodicon of Orthodoxy
http://www.oodegr.com/english/ekklisia/synodoi/synodicon_of_orthodoxy.htm

This one is followed by the article of Metropolitan Hierotheos Vlachos explaining the Synodicon of Orthodoxy.
The Orthodox Outlet For Dogmatic Enquiries (OODE) website is the most informative English language website I have seen from the Synod of Greece.  The books it has online are really well chosen and choice.

For what it's worth, the edition of the True Vine which I mentioned also includes the Synodicon of the Holy Spirit, but that is not read until the second day of Pentecost.
 

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Dionysii said:
The Synodicon of Orthodoxy was omitted from Bishop Kallistos Ware's English translation of the Triodion because it names and anathematizes heresies as well as names Saints who have followed the truth.  If parishioners knew and understood the implications of the contents of the Synodikon of Orthodoxy, then many synods would have a lot to explain.
Could you stop your conspiracy theories?
 

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MarkosC said:
which liturgical book contains the Synodikon of Orthodoxy?
"The 'Synodikon of Orthodoxy' is a text contained in the “Triodion” and read on the Sunday of Orthodoxy, the first Sunday of Lent."
- Metropolitan Hierotheos of Nafpaktos
http://www.oodegr.com/english/ekklisia/synodoi/synodicon_of_orthodoxy.htm


Just so you don't have to take my word for it.
 

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Why did Titular Metropolitan Kallistos not do translation of the synodikon of orthodoxy in that? sounds very silly for himj to not translate it.

Then again, when is the last time the Patriarchate of Constantinople pronounced it?
 

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Gunnarr said:
Why did Titular Metropolitan Kallistos not do translation of the synodikon of orthodoxy in that? sounds very silly for himj to not translate it.

Then again, when is the last time the Patriarchate of Constantinople pronounced it?
It was read by the priest in the local Church here (Greek Old Calendar/Matthewite).
 

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DuxI said:
Iconodule said:
Another version: http://www.johnsanidopoulos.com/2010/02/synodicon-of-orthodoxy.html

Unfortunately John Sanidopoulos doesn't remember where he found this one!
Maybe from here:

http://preachersinstitute.com/2011/03/11/the-synodikon-of-orthodoxy/
I lol'd when it called St. Severus of Antioch and Sergius the Monophysite "Like-minded".
 

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sheenj said:
DuxI said:
Iconodule said:
Another version: http://www.johnsanidopoulos.com/2010/02/synodicon-of-orthodoxy.html

Unfortunately John Sanidopoulos doesn't remember where he found this one!
Maybe from here:

http://preachersinstitute.com/2011/03/11/the-synodikon-of-orthodoxy/
I lol'd when it called St. Severus of Antioch and Sergius the Monophysite "Like-minded".
Brings to mind the words of the Lord:
[size=10pt] Woe to you who laugh now, For you shall mourn and weep. (Luke 6:25)
  :police:
 

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jah777 said:
sheenj said:
DuxI said:
Iconodule said:
Another version: http://www.johnsanidopoulos.com/2010/02/synodicon-of-orthodoxy.html

Unfortunately John Sanidopoulos doesn't remember where he found this one!
Maybe from here:

http://preachersinstitute.com/2011/03/11/the-synodikon-of-orthodoxy/
I lol'd when it called St. Severus of Antioch and Sergius the Monophysite "Like-minded".
Brings to mind the words of the Lord:
[size=10pt] Woe to you who laugh now, For you shall mourn and weep. (Luke 6:25)
  :police:
Better yet:

Blessed are you when people insult you, persecute you and falsely say all kinds of evil against you because of me. Rejoice and be glad, because great is your reward in heaven, for in the same way they persecuted the prophets who were before you.
 

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Dionysii said:
MarkosC said:
which liturgical book contains the Synodikon of Orthodoxy?
Traditionally, the Triodion.  I have seen Greek editions of the Triodion that include the Synodicon of Orthodoxy. 
However, Bishop Kallistos Ware omitted the Synodikon of Orthodoxy in his English translation of the Triodion.   

In my opinion, this document is not well known by English speakers precisely to keep English speaking people from questioning their synods' compliance with what it says. The Synodicon of Orthodoxy was omitted from Bishop Kallistos Ware's English translation of the Triodion because it names and anathematizes heresies as well as names Saints who have followed the truth.  If parishioners knew and understood the implications of the contents of the Synodikon of Orthodoxy, then many synods would have a lot to explain.

First, Metropolitan Kallistos did not translate any of the Triodion. Mother Mary did the liturgical text translation. It is what was being doing in her monastery. There is a lot more than just the synodikon missing from the edition with Metropolitan Kallistos' name on it. There is a supplemental volume that includes many of the missing text. I am not sure if it is in there or not, maybe someone else can answer that.

The reason it is not included in the popular English version of Met. Kallistos and Mother Mary is that the full Synodikon is only suppose to be done by a bishop. The problem is we have many priest who think of themselves as bishops, but only a Bishop can give an anathema (and even then it should be done in Synod).
 

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arimethea said:
Dionysii said:
MarkosC said:
which liturgical book contains the Synodikon of Orthodoxy?
Traditionally, the Triodion.  I have seen Greek editions of the Triodion that include the Synodicon of Orthodoxy. 
However, Bishop Kallistos Ware omitted the Synodikon of Orthodoxy in his English translation of the Triodion.   

In my opinion, this document is not well known by English speakers precisely to keep English speaking people from questioning their synods' compliance with what it says. The Synodicon of Orthodoxy was omitted from Bishop Kallistos Ware's English translation of the Triodion because it names and anathematizes heresies as well as names Saints who have followed the truth.  If parishioners knew and understood the implications of the contents of the Synodikon of Orthodoxy, then many synods would have a lot to explain.

There is a supplemental volume that includes many of the missing text. I am not sure if it is in there or not, maybe someone else can answer that.
No, the Synodikon is not in the supplemental volume.
 

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jah777 said:
arimethea said:
There is a supplemental volume that includes many of the missing text. I am not sure if it is in there or not, maybe someone else can answer that.
No, the Synodikon is not in the supplemental volume.
Thanks for confirming this. Like I had said previously, Mother Mary's translations are what was being used in her community. Since there was no Bishop in here female monastery, then why would she ever bother translating the entire Synodikon? These text were not about completeness, instead they where about being practical. That is why the weekend text were released in a single volume and widely distributed, and the weekday text are almost impossible to find.
 

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arimethea said:
the weekday text are almost impossible to find.
I believe St John of Kronstadt Press sells the Supplemental volume.
 

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arimethea said:
The reason it is not included in the popular English version of Met. Kallistos and Mother Mary is that the full Synodikon is only suppose to be done by a bishop.
That is definitely not the custom in my Church. 
Do you know of a written precedent which teaches that the Synodicon can only be read by a bishop?
 

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Dionysii said:
arimethea said:
The reason it is not included in the popular English version of Met. Kallistos and Mother Mary is that the full Synodikon is only suppose to be done by a bishop.
That is definitely not the custom in my Church.  
Do you know of a written precedent which teaches that the Synodicon can only be read by a bishop?
It is as arimathea has said: only bishops, and a synod of bishops at that, can issue anathemas. Lower clergy and laymen do not have this authority. If your church is conducting the Synodikon without a bishop, it is in error.
 

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LBK said:
only bishops, and a synod of bishops at that, can issue anathemas. Lower clergy and laymen do not have this authority. If your church is conducting the Synodikon without a bishop, it is in error.
Thank you.  I do already understand that the issuance of anathemas is a matter reserved for bishops.  

I understand that for a priest or lay reader to read the Synodicon (or any anathema issued by a synod) aloud publicly in Church in the absence of a bishop is to proclaim an anathema already issued by a synod.  The synod is the entity which issues the anathema - not the reader who merely proclaims it.  

It appears likely that we have a significantly different understanding of how the word "issue" is understood in this context.


EDIT:  Do you know of any canon or written tradition that explicitly prohibits anyone other than bishops from reading anathemas (issued by a synod) aloud in Church - in cases where a bishop is absent?
I am quite certain that my Church practices correctly by reading the Synodicon aloud.  Otherwise, how would people hear the truth?  
If you can produce some written evidence from the tradition of the Orthodox Church that explicitly outlaws Church readers from reading synodal decrees such as anathemas aloud, then I would be glad to reconsider.
 

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Dionysii said:
LBK said:
only bishops, and a synod of bishops at that, can issue anathemas. Lower clergy and laymen do not have this authority. If your church is conducting the Synodikon without a bishop, it is in error.
Thank you.  I do already understand that the issuance of anathemas is a matter reserved for bishops.  

I understand that for a priest or lay reader to read the Synodicon (or any anathema issued by a synod) aloud publicly in Church in the absence of a bishop is to proclaim an anathema already issued by a synod.  The synod is the entity which issues the anathema - not the reader who merely proclaims it.  

It appears likely that we have a significantly different understanding of how the word "issue" is understood in this context.


EDIT:  Do you know of any canon or written tradition that explicitly prohibits anyone other than bishops from reading anathemas (issued by a synod) aloud in Church - in cases where a bishop is absent?
Not everything is written down in Orthodoxy, a great many traditions are simply, and correctly, passed down by other means - by praxis, by oral tradition, etc. What is consistent in this case, as attested to by contributors to this thread, is that the Synodikon service is not served in the absence of a bishop. The absence of the text of this service from most Lenten Triodia published for parish and monastic use is also instructive.
 

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LBK said:
Not everything is written down in Orthodoxy, a great many traditions are simply, and correctly, passed down by other means - by praxis, by oral tradition, etc.
If that is indeed all you have to go on, then I would say that the tradition of any Church which prohibits the reading of the Synodicon of Orthodoxy on the first Lord's day of Lent is a Church that uses a tradition which is an artificial fabrication and a lie. 

To accuse Churches which make known and proclaim the Synodicon of Orthodoxy publicly aloud in Church even without a bishop as allegedly being in error is to falsely accuse without any precedent in Christian tradition except that which has been fabricated by heretics in modern times for their own convenience.
 

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LBK said:
What is consistent in this case, as attested to by contributors to this thread, is that the Synodikon service is not served in the absence of a bishop.
This is an indication only that these individuals have been persuaded to follow a recent popular custom and that they are ignorant of ancient tradition.
 
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