• A blessed Nativity / Theophany season to all! For users new and old: the forum rules were streamlined when we transitioned to the new software. Please ensure that you are familiar with them. Continued use of the forum means that you (a) know the rules, and (b) pledge that you'll abide by them. For more information, check out the OrthodoxChristianity.Net Rules section. (There are only 2 threads there - Rules, and Administrative Structure.)

What does the Orthodox community (Eastern & Oriental) look like in your city?

88Devin12

Protokentarchos
Joined
Feb 28, 2008
Messages
5,182
Reaction score
0
Points
0
I was thinking today, after a pan-orthodox (Eastern Orthodox) service, what things would look like if Eastern & Oriental Orthodox were united. That got me to thinking about how sizeable the community in my city is, and made me wonder what it's like in other cities around the country (and world).

What does the Eastern/Oriental community look like in your city (or equivalent city-size entity in mega cities)? What are some of the local parishes? Are there a lot of festivals and events? Is there any interaction between Eastern & Oriental Orthodox in your community?
 

lovesupreme

OC.Net Guru
Joined
Apr 15, 2012
Messages
1,451
Reaction score
0
Points
0
There's a permanent Greek Church and an Antiochian Church. From what I understand, the Russian community meets every month through an OCA mission. There's a tiny ROCOR Church here but I think unfortunately that there was some internal drama surrounding that and I don't know if it's still active.

There are no OO churches. Those who identify as OO usually attend the Antiochian Church, if they attend at all.
 

biro

Protostrator
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 31, 2010
Messages
23,380
Reaction score
109
Points
63
Age
47
Website
archiveofourown.org
In my area, there are a Greek Orthodox parish and an OCA one.

In Tampa, not far from me, there are lots of Orthodox churches, both Eastern and Oriental. Not sure if they do anything together.
 

88Devin12

Protokentarchos
Joined
Feb 28, 2008
Messages
5,182
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Here in Kansas City (I'll include the whole metropolitan area, including Topeka) the Eastern & Oriental Orthodox communities are both pretty sizeable for a city our size and for being in the middle of the country.

There are 10 Eastern Orthodox Churches in the Kansas City area. The oldest parishes have been around since the early 1900s, including Serbian, Russian & Greek communities. Though all have moved far away from their original locations in the city center.

There are 2 Antiochian parishes, 2 OCA parishes, 3 Serbian parishes, 2 Greek parishes, 1 Russian (ROCOR) parish, and 2 Serbian monasteries (men/women combined on one property, separate buildings).

The 2 Greek parishes have their own Greek festivals every year, and one Antiochian parish has begun a festival of its own focused on food from the Middle East and various Orthodox nations.

The Eastern Orthodox clergy have their own brotherhood which meets at least once a month where they can meet, eat and discuss various topics. There are multiple pan-Orthodox (Eastern Orthodox) services each year including a river blessing after Old-Calendar Theophany (so all can participate), Sunday of Orthodoxy, multiple Lenten services, and Holy Unction at the beginning of the Nativity Fast.


There are 5 Oriental Orthodox Churches in the Kansas City area. One is located in one of the old Serbian Orthodox Churches that was left in the city center.

There are 2 Ethiopian parishes, 1 Coptic parish, 1 Armenian parish and 1 Malankara parish.

There isn't too much interaction between the Oriental Orthodox & Eastern Orthodox communities. Though when the Indian Orthodox parish was looking for a home, local Orthodox parishes allowed the use of their facilities and church buildings to the Indian Orthodox community (with permission of their Bishops) until they found a more permanent home, and the Indian Orthodox Priest (who graduated from St. Tikhon's) was welcomed by the Eastern Orthodox clergy and invited to attend several services.

In total, there are 15 parishes in Kansas City, with 2 Eastern Orthodox monasteries (on 1 property but with separate buildings).

There is an Eastern Orthodox mission set up in the center of Kansas City at St. Mary of Egypt parish. Called Reconciliation Services, it helps serve those in need in the urban area of the city. Eastern Orthodox parishes in KC volunteer each month to help feed the poor and visit with the needy.

Here are some photos of the local parishes:

http://static.panoramio.com/photos/large/32899321.jpg
https://static.panoramio.com.storage.googleapis.com/photos/1920x1280/80739638.jpg
https://static.panoramio.com.storage.googleapis.com/photos/1920x1280/80739641.jpg
https://static.panoramio.com.storage.googleapis.com/photos/large/95745824.jpg
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3263/5833626782_479bc546b7.jpg
http://static.panoramio.com/photos/large/95980068.jpg
http://static.panoramio.com/photos/large/32899299.jpg
http://www.rs3101.org/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/reconciliation_services.jpg
https://goo.gl/maps/Q9g9j
https://goo.gl/maps/MpoFm
https://goo.gl/maps/o55oF
http://static.wixstatic.com/media/2ca01c_5c29bbee91eb4b1a9164ed791ca228da.jpg_srz_p_1162_663_75_22_0.50_1.20_0.00_jpg_srz

That last photo is the monastery chapel.
 

xOrthodox4Christx

Taxiarches
Joined
Apr 28, 2013
Messages
7,322
Reaction score
0
Points
0
There are maybe a bit more than 10 Orthodox parishes in my area, in the Twin Cities.

There are Oriental, one Armenian, one Coptic Church and there are a few score Ethiopian Churches that are roundabout. Most of them are way too far away for me to be able to bother with.

In terms of Eastern Orthodox, there are a few OCA parishes, a couple Greek, a couple Antiochian, one Russian and one Ukrainian parish.
 

Christina

Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2013
Messages
135
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
44
Location
Athens, Georgia
88Devin12 said:
What does the Eastern/Oriental community look like in your city (or equivalent city-size entity in mega cities)?
It looks like the people at my church, roughly 40 families.

88Devin12 said:
What are some of the local parishes?
We are the local parish.

88Devin12 said:
Are there a lot of festivals and events?
We have a small Greek food festival in the fall.

88Devin12 said:
Is there any interaction between Eastern & Oriental Orthodox in your community?
We have an Eritrean family who attends services.
 

xOrthodox4Christx

Taxiarches
Joined
Apr 28, 2013
Messages
7,322
Reaction score
0
Points
0
88Devin12 said:
Is there any interaction between Eastern & Oriental Orthodox in your community?
There was a Copt who attended the services at an OCA parish I went to.
 

Asteriktos

Strategos
Joined
Oct 4, 2002
Messages
39,501
Reaction score
265
Points
83
Age
41
Since my area is semi-rural, and there is only one parish in the small and fairly isolated city (pop. 8200) that I am near, I'm going to be a bit broader and discuss the region instead. The closest parish here is a  Carpatho-Russian community; they organise trips, get togethers, dinners, etc. from time to time, but I think there are limitations as to what can be done. There is a moderately-sized* Antiochian parish about a 25 minute drive away, and they do various activities as they are able. Antiochian village is about a 35 minute drive away. Expanding out to about a 45 minute drive nets another four tiny/small parishes. I believe the two closest Oriental Orthodox parishes are each about an hour and a half away(Pittsburgh and Altoona). So much for the infamously large Orthodox precense in Western PA  8)


*Moderately-sized for the Antiochians I mean
 

truthseeker32

High Elder
Joined
Oct 2, 2011
Messages
643
Reaction score
0
Points
0
I live in a metro area of about 150,000 people and there is not a single Eastern Orthodox or Oriental Orthodox Church. There are a dozen or so Ethiopian and Greek students in the area who either attend the local Roman Catholic parish or just don't go to services at all. One-hundred miles to the north there is a metro area of about 90,000 people with one small Greek Orthodox parish, and 50 miles to the south there is a metro area of 500,000 people with one small Greek Orthodox parish that has a Greek cultural festival in the early fall and a very small Ethiopian Orthodox parish.
 

biro

Protostrator
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 31, 2010
Messages
23,380
Reaction score
109
Points
63
Age
47
Website
archiveofourown.org
truthseeker32 said:
I live in a metro area of about 150,000 people and there is not a single Eastern Orthodox or Oriental Orthodox Church. There are a dozen or so Ethiopian and Greek students in the area who either attend the local Roman Catholic parish or just don't go to services at all. One-hundred miles to the north there is a metro area of about 90,000 people with one small Greek Orthodox parish, and 50 miles to the south there is a metro area of 500,000 people with one small Greek Orthodox parish that has a Greek cultural festival in the early fall and a very small Ethiopian Orthodox parish.
That's interesting! Maybe you'll get another mission parish someday. :)
 

truthseeker32

High Elder
Joined
Oct 2, 2011
Messages
643
Reaction score
0
Points
0
biro said:
That's interesting! Maybe you'll get another mission parish someday. :)
Hopefully so. My area is heavily dominated by the Mormon faith and if someone is not Mormon they tend to be jaded and anti religion so I can't imagine it happening unless there is a large influx of Orthodox Christians.
 

sakura95

OC.Net Guru
Joined
May 9, 2014
Messages
1,437
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
25
Location
Brighton, UK
This has been something I had observed each time I attended the Liturgy. Quite a number of the congregant arrive late for the Liturgy. Sometimes shortly before the distribution of the Eucharistic elements.

Anyone know why this is the case? It made it seem that quite a majority of parishioners are rather....nominal(it just is to me but I can't say for sure).
 

Serge

Archon
Joined
Oct 3, 2002
Messages
3,212
Reaction score
17
Points
38
Age
54
Website
sergesblog.blogspot.com
In Philadelphia, my guess is the Orthodox and Oriental church scene is bigger and more visible than in most of the rest of the United States but smaller and thinner than in much of the rest of Pennsylvania (a hub of Slavic Eastern Christianity in America, as seen in the movie The Deer Hunter). All of the main players (the Orthodox big three in America: Greek, OCA, and Antiochian) are here as well as smaller ones: Greek (cathedral and several parishes), OCA (ditto), Antiochian (two parishes I know of; one Arab, one convert), MP (two city parishes, one, the pro-cathedral, vibrantly immigrant Russian), ROCOR (one parish; WWII exiles and some post-Soviet immigration), ACROD (two parishes, one a 1930s split from a Catholic parish), Ukrainians (two parishes), Serbs (one parish, moved from city to 'burbs), Romanians (one city parish; immigrant), Armenians (two parishes), Copts (at least one parish), and Malankara (one parish). The Greeks, OCA, and MP have cathedrals here; I think the latter are pro-cathedrals (no resident bishop). The nearest parish to me is immigrant Greek, followed by immigrant Arab Antiochian and a Malankara parish. Churches I've been to: Greek (twice), OCA (many times), ROCOR (ditto), MP (ditto), ACROD (three times), Ukrainian (once), and Armenian (once). Immigration replenishes several of these parishes. I can think of one convert parish, in the 'burbs; Antiochian. The city parishes not being fed by immigration are stolidly declining, in neighborhoods now moribund (the white ethnic parishioners have died or moved; the Ukrainian and Ruthenian Catholics are experiencing this loss too). Some pan-Orthodox stuff; mostly ethnic enclaves little to do with each other.

This has been something I had observed each time I attended the Liturgy. Quite a number of the congregants arrive late for the Liturgy. Sometimes shortly before the distribution of the Eucharistic elements.

Anyone know why this is the case? It made it seem that quite a majority of parishioners are rather....nominal (it just is to me but I can't say for sure).
Not ideal but hardly out of the ordinary historically. Traditionally, Orthodox and Western Catholics rarely receive Communion even though Mass is every week. (In the modern Catholic Church, lots of people receive whenever they come, whether they're prepared or not; not our teaching and a problem.) It's not unusual for old-country Orthodox (or Roman Catholics) to pop into church for just part of the service to light candles, say a few prayers, and maybe socialize/network a bit.

Folk church (not to be confused with church teaching): men are often not expected to participate. Maybe stand on the porch and smoke or pass around a flask of vodka while the ladies do their devotions and the priest does the service, which simply goes on, in Orthodoxy for hours, regardless of the size or attentiveness of the congregation.
 

Arachne

Matriarch
Staff member
Moderator
Site Supporter
Joined
Dec 22, 2012
Messages
12,268
Reaction score
160
Points
63
Age
48
Location
Camulodunum
There are two Orthodox parishes in Colchester; the Antiochian one we attend, and a ROCOR one that hived off us a few years ago. Last year there was a new parish established in Basildon as well, so we've lost some more of the parishioners that used to come into town, but I can't begrudge them - it's a long drive, and having a church in their town will probably allow them to attend more often.

According to our priest, attendance varies between 30-50 people on any given Sunday, more on feast days. Paschal services can bring in over 200 people if Pascha doesn't fall close to western Easter (that's when the Greek students of the local university don't get to go home). Considering how tiny the place is, the regulars have no trouble filling it.

There are no regular events, either alone or shared, but the two parishes notify one another if something special is going to take place, like when the Kursk Root Icon came to the Russians for just one morning. :)
 

Serge

Archon
Joined
Oct 3, 2002
Messages
3,212
Reaction score
17
Points
38
Age
54
Website
sergesblog.blogspot.com
Arachne said:
There are two Orthodox parishes in Colchester; the Antiochian one we attend, and a ROCOR one that hived off us a few years ago.
I saw something like that in Placerville, California, almost 20 years ago. I think the parish was originally associated with the Antiochians' ex-exangelical parish in Ben Lomond, California. With the shake-up there, and Ben Lomond's then-parish priest's liking for Russian Orthodoxy, Placerville, formerly a Vineyard fellowship, went ROCOR. Interesting: everything you'd expect at one of their ethnic parishes but not a lick of Slavonic or Russian, and the parish priest, formerly the Vineyard minister, told me he wasn't expected to learn. Not a problem, another priest told me later: ROCOR meetings are like the UN with someone translating from Russian to English through earpieces.

Arachne said:
Last year there was a new parish established in Basildon as well, so we've lost some more of the parishioners that used to come into town, but I can't begrudge them - it's a long drive, and having a church in their town will probably allow them to attend more often.
That makes sense.
 

sakura95

OC.Net Guru
Joined
May 9, 2014
Messages
1,437
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
25
Location
Brighton, UK
The young fogey said:
Not ideal but hardly out of the ordinary historically. Traditionally, Orthodox and Western Catholics rarely receive Communion even though Mass is every week. (In the modern Catholic Church, lots of people receive whenever they come, whether they're prepared or not; not our teaching and a problem.) It's not unusual for old-country Orthodox (or Roman Catholics) to pop into church for just part of the service to light candles, say a few prayers, and maybe socialize/network a bit.

Folk church (not to be confused with church teaching): men are often not expected to participate. Maybe stand on the porch and smoke or pass around a flask of vodka while the ladies do their devotions and the priest does the service, which simply goes on, in Orthodoxy for hours, regardless of the size or attentiveness of the congregation.
Men at the Parish I attend do participate in Worship. None of the men slacking off and drinking vodka happens. But the part about people coming to venerate Icons, light candles and then leave is a practice of a few Parishioners. For the most part, Parishioners are attentive during the Liturgy, though paying attention is difficult when there are children around. They tend to run around and make noises. The way some of them try to venerate Icons are simply adorable.
 

Serge

Archon
Joined
Oct 3, 2002
Messages
3,212
Reaction score
17
Points
38
Age
54
Website
sergesblog.blogspot.com
Without a doubt there are parishes that are more "by the book" with pious men; I'm just saying that in traditional folk culture, Catholic and Orthodox, it's often not so.
 

ironchapman

High Elder
Joined
Oct 22, 2011
Messages
829
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Location
North Dakota
I live west of Atlanta. There's a few churches in town and in the area immediately surrounding the city, but the nearest Orthodox church to me is a good 25 minute drive away (albeit only 12 or 13 miles, but it's small roads and a state highway).

The churches in Atlanta are home to some small communities, but it's certainly not much compared to, say, places in Pennsylvania.
 

Alpo

Merarches
Joined
Dec 9, 2007
Messages
9,878
Reaction score
1
Points
0
There aren't any OO churches around here. Visiting Coptic and Ethiopian clergy use EO churches for their occasional services. Some OOs attend EO church and AFAIK commune too. I've heard though that some Ethiopian priests have told their parishioners not to commune in Finnish churches
 

mabsoota

Archon
Joined
Jan 7, 2011
Messages
2,859
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Arachne said:
Last year there was a new parish established in Basildon as well
i went to the website and see that father alexander goes there.
i met him once, nice man. may God bless the work there in the church.
(we did discuss chalcedon at the first meeting, but the discussion went well!)

i can't discuss my town as i am trying to stay vaguely anonymous!
also i have moved house quite a lot. i like to visit as many EO and OO churches as i can.
:)
 

xOrthodox4Christx

Taxiarches
Joined
Apr 28, 2013
Messages
7,322
Reaction score
0
Points
0
primuspilus said:
There are 2 Orthodox Churches. One is us, a WR parish, and another is a Greek parish with no priest who dont think we're Orthodox enough.

PP
No priest? And they're going after you?
 

primuspilus

Taxiarches
Joined
May 27, 2011
Messages
7,990
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
41
Location
A displaced Southerner in the Godless North
Website
www.saintgregorythetheologian.org
xOrthodox4Christx said:
primuspilus said:
There are 2 Orthodox Churches. One is us, a WR parish, and another is a Greek parish with no priest who dont think we're Orthodox enough.

PP
No priest? And they're going after you?
They're not mean about it, they just dont want to really associate with us. They think the Western Rite is the Diet Coke of Orthodoxy. Their former priest retired...he's like 80+ years old. I believe an OCA priest is helping out, but they do not have a full time priest.

PP
 

Dominika

Taxiarches
Staff member
Global Moderator
Moderator
Joined
Dec 23, 2011
Messages
7,608
Reaction score
157
Points
63
Age
29
Location
Poland
Website
www.youtube.com
Warsaw - something diffrent from US reality ;):
2 EO churches (including metropolitan cathedral), 4 EO chapels functioning as parishes, Orthodox seminary with chapel functioning also as parish in some way (of course all these ones belonging to the Polish Church). No OO churches nor chapels, as there are very few of them.
Orthodox Armenians have services 1-2 times monthly in the unique (Ukrainian) Greek Catholic church in Warsaw (that's strange, as in another city they use an Orthodox church), Orthodox Copts have 1 monthly (plus rarely some other services e.g weddings) Liturgy in one of the chapels functioning as a parish. I know a few Ethiopians and Copts attend services at the cathedral, and 1 Copt attends the services at the seminary chapel.

There used to be 1 Malankara Orthodox attending my parish (that's one of the churches), but he has left for India.
So, generally speaking, OO are treated as EO (they don't have problems e.g to get sacraments, as far as I know, at least in Warsaw), but you should remember there are very few of OO; as for EO, no idea; most of us are Polish Orthodox, but there are some immigrants as it's capital city, mainly from Ukraine and Belarus, but not only).

There are regular various meetings in different parishes for the Orthodox students, youth, elders, some exhibitions, parties (mainly before Nativity Fast and Great Lent and after Epiphany) not only in the Centre of Orthodox Culture (that's located close to the cathedral), but also in the parish houses.
 
Top