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What is Antidoron and What is Its Origin and Meaning?

Iconodule

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A nice little article about antidoron and how the practice has developed over time:

https://blog.obitel-minsk.com/2019/02/what-is-antidoron-and-what-is-its-origin-and-meaning.html
 

WPM

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The little pieces of bread offered after Liturgy.
 

Dominika

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Greek Orthodox Churches have a peculiar custom of raising the holy antidoron above the Holy Gifts during the anaphora, after the epiklesis, with the following words
Also Antiochian and Romanian, at least from what I've seen. I'm not sure about (at least some) Polish and Serbian parishes - I haven't concentrated on that ;)
 

JTLoganville

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Dominika said:
Greek Orthodox Churches have a peculiar custom of raising the holy antidoron above the Holy Gifts during the anaphora, after the epiklesis, with the following words
Also Antiochian and Romanian, at least from what I've seen. I'm not sure about (at least some) Polish and Serbian parishes - I haven't concentrated on that ;)
The prayer "Blessed is the Name of the Holy Trinity, now and always and forever and ever" is very brief and easily missed.

It usually occurs during the Hymn to the Theotokos, so those involved in chanting or choir are especially likely to be otherwise occupied, particularly now during Great Lent when we are more glued to the score as we sing the less familiar "In thee all creation...".
 

iohanne

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Does this have the same origins as the pain bénit of the western Church, and would the pain bénit be appropriate for western-rite Orthodox parishes?

A picture of the distribution of such is in the two attached photos, followed by a picture of the bread being presented and blessed.  I'm not sure why the woman presenting it is dressed as a bride, and I have no idea why the pain bénit has two huge candle sticks coming out of it.  Anyone hazard a guess?  The fourth picture is simply for comparison with the first two pictures and includes Coptic altar boys/deacons (?) with Coptic antidoron or, as it's called by the laity, 'urban.

Here is the Wikipedia article on pain bénit, with my translations in italics. 

Le pain bénit est constitué de pain apporté par les fidèles, béni par le prêtre et distribué aux fidèles après la messe. Ceux-ci le rapportaient généralement chez eux.
The blessed bread consists of bread brought by the faithful, blessed by the priest and distributed to the faithful after the Mass. These are generally brought home.

À la différence des hosties, qui sont consacrées et deviennent, pour les chrétiens, le corps et le sang du Christ, le pain bénit est un sacramental, au même titre que l'eau bénite.
Unlike the Hosts, which are consecrated and become, for Christians, the Body and Blood of Christ, the blessed bread is a sacramental, of the same status as holy water.

The problem is, I can't find any more references to this pain bénit which would indicate that it was a regular weekly practice of the Churches in France and Québec, rather than an occasional thing, such as the giving of blessed chalk on Three Kings (Epiphany) or candles on Candlemas (the Meeting of the Lord). 

Does anyone have more information on this or happen to know any more resources?
 

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