What is everyone reading?

Alxandra

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The Hermitess Photini by Archimandrite Joachim Spetseris
 

Volnutt

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"The Moviegoer" by Walker Percy

"Two Old Women" by Velma Wallis- a retelling of an Athabaskan legend
 

Arachne

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A 20-minute read. I so needed the giggle today.
 

biro

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"Izzy and Lenore," John Katz; "The Jester," Michael Sullivan; and "Local Custom," Sharon Lee and Steve Miller. Only the first one was good.
 

Asteriktos

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I'm afraid I just started it (and at about 775 pp. of content I really just started), so I can't give an opinion of my own, but here is some of the "book description":

What does it mean to say that we live in a secular age? Almost everyone would agree that we--in the West, at least--largely do. And clearly the place of religion in our societies has changed profoundly in the last few centuries. In what will be a defining book for our time, Charles Taylor takes up the question of what these changes mean--of what, precisely, happens when a society in which it is virtually impossible not to believe in God becomes one in which faith, even for the staunchest believer, is only one human possibility among others.

Taylor... examines the development in "Western Christendom" of those aspects of modernity which we call secular. What he describes is in fact not a single, continuous transformation, but a series of new departures, in which earlier forms of religious life have been dissolved or destabilized and new ones have been created. As we see here, today's secular world is characterized not by an absence of religion--although in some societies religious belief and practice have markedly declined--but rather by the continuing multiplication of new options, religious, spiritual, and anti-religious, which individuals and groups seize on in order to make sense of their lives and give shape to their spiritual aspirations.
The book was discussed in an article LenInSebastopol mentioned in this thread.
 

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"Red storm rising" by Tom Clancy (in english), it is "fiction" about possible scenario of the Third World War
"The dead lake" by Nikolay Nekrasov, it is novel about life in (or "at"?) XIX century in Russian Empire (in russian)
"Old testament" (in russian)
 

Volnutt

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rgNick said:
"Red storm rising" by Tom Clancy (in english), it is "fiction" about possible scenario of the Third World War
"The dead lake" by Nikolay Nekrasov, it is novel about life in (or "at"?) XIX century in Russian Empire (in russian)
"Old testament" (in russian)
"In" is the right word for a period of history. :)

I wish I could read Russian.
 

rgNick

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Volnutt said:
rgNick said:
"Red storm rising" by Tom Clancy (in english), it is "fiction" about possible scenario of the Third World War
"The dead lake" by Nikolay Nekrasov, it is novel about life in (or "at"?) XIX century in Russian Empire (in russian)
"Old testament" (in russian)
"In" is the right word for a period of history. :)

I wish I could read Russian.
Thank you!

I know good russian Christian forum, if you need, for practice)
 

Volnutt

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rgNick said:
Volnutt said:
rgNick said:
"Red storm rising" by Tom Clancy (in english), it is "fiction" about possible scenario of the Third World War
"The dead lake" by Nikolay Nekrasov, it is novel about life in (or "at"?) XIX century in Russian Empire (in russian)
"Old testament" (in russian)
"In" is the right word for a period of history. :)

I wish I could read Russian.
Thank you!

I know good russian Christian forum, if you need, for practice)
Thanks. I'm concentrating on German right now, though.
 

wainscottbl

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The Essays of Michel de Montaigne, particularly "On the Education of Children". Read it, but working on an essay now for school on it.
 

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A paper by Kai-man Kwan, "The Argument from Religious Experience".  As the title suggests, he promotes and defends the idea that theistic experiences can be used as evidence for the existence of God.  It can be found in the Blackwell Companion to Natural Theology.

It's very interesting to say the least.  I was skeptical that religious experiences could be of much apologetic value, but not after reading this.  I might make a post about it, though I have concerns that I will get trolled if I do so.
 

methodius

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  along a similar line might be Karen Armstrong's book "The case for God."
There is or was, an internet video of her going through the argument of the book; the sound was of rather poor quality, but the content was interesting.
 

john_mo

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methodius said:
  along a similar line might be Karen Armstrong's book "The case for God."
There is or was, an internet video of her going through the argument of the book; the sound was of rather poor quality, but the content was interesting.
Interesting, it says that she favors mystic theology (wikipedia).  It also says that she is influenced by apophatic theology.  Is she Orthodox?  I've never heard of her, but I'm guessing it's much more readable than Kwan.  He's evangelical (I think) b ut was a student of Dr. Richard Swinburne, and it shows. He used Swinburne's Principle of Credulity, but made it more skeptic proof.  
 

methodius

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no. She entered an English convent at the age of 16 but left it a few years later because she couldn't accept the Reality of the Resurrection.
Since then she has described herself as an 'uncommitted monotheist.' Her writings draw equally from the three Abrahamic religions; and frequently quotes from 'the Buddha' and the 'Tao.'
Writes well, a pleasure to read.
and by the way, is very familiar with the theology of Orthodoxy; and surprisingly, considering her background, finds it far superior to [Roman] Catholicism.
 

methodius

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different topic;
any suggestions as to what I might read as my first foray into Russian novels [in English?]
 

Volnutt

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methodius said:
different topic;
any suggestions as to what I might read as my first foray into Russian novels [in English?]
Everybody is going to suggest The Brothers Karamazov.
 

Volnutt

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Arachne said:
Volnutt said:
methodius said:
different topic;
any suggestions as to what I might read as my first foray into Russian novels [in English?]
Everybody is going to suggest The Brothers Karamazov.
Not quite. ;) My personal favourite is Yama (The Pit).
lol. I really like We by Yevgeny Zamyatin, the book that Aldous Huxley was accused of plagiarizing to write Brave New World.
 

methodius

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not 'reading'  in this case; but 2, or maybe 3 of 'The Chronicles of Narnia' can be seen at no charge from 'putlocker....'
The Lion, the witch and the wardrobe;
and
The voyage of the Dawn Treader.

I've read and re-read the series umpteen times, and the videos are pretty good.

C.S.Lewis has been described as the most Orthodox of Anglicans. [note: capital 'O']
 

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methodius said:
ok, thanks. I'll go w. the bros.
The 'bros' is great, but long! I'd personally recommend 'Crime and Punishment' if you haven't read it. It's a great read, and not too cumbersome. Then read Karamazov if you liked the first... although in my opinion, you can't really go wrong with Dostoevsky, period.
 

stavros_388

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methodius said:
  along a similar line might be Karen Armstrong's book "The case for God."
There is or was, an internet video of her going through the argument of the book; the sound was of rather poor quality, but the content was interesting.
I own the book, and am just listening to the audiobook during my commute. She really knows her stuff, and is a wonderful writer!

I'd say that this, as well as David Bentley Hart's most recent book, "The Experience of God", are two of the best recent defenses of religion, and theism in particular, and serve as much needed responses to the militant (and often largely uninformed) atheistic books that are currently so popular.
 

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The Republic, and while I do, I am going to read Aristotle's "Categories". It is perhaps the most important of all Aristotle gave us. It is about first principles and Being. Without it you cannot properly understand what Aristotle is saying. And I think it is good to read Republic before "Politics" since it came first. I'd like to read Aristotle's "On Famous Epileptics". I am sure I can find it online.
 

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One Man Tango by Anthony Quinn

This is Anthony Quinn's autobiography - my favorite actor, along with Robert Duvall. The book is a masterpiece really. The account of his attempted seduction by Mae West is worth the read alone, and that’s hardly the best part. But this book is by no means another tired account of the escapades and exploits of a Hollywood star. Anthony Quinn’s writing is poetic, introspective, philosophical, self-effacing, and redemptive. The man wrote as well as he acted, bearing his heart and soul with every sentence. Anthony Quinn lived a life that transcended anything that could be captured in a novel or on film. There are plenty of lurid details in here, but he writes with a raw honesty that never seems sensational or exploitative. Anthony Quinn was the quintessential "man's man," but he seemed to have a soft and genuine soul. He was a true artist, and quite a versatile artist as well - an actor, a writer, a painter and a sculptor. This book is one of the most fascinating autobiographies I've ever read. What joyful discovery. I highly recommend it!





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