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What is everyone reading?

Christos3

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No, John Ciardi. I picked it up at a used book store for fifty cents.
 

Doof

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I'm reading an abridged version of the Triads.
I'm going to read Michio Kaku's Parallel Worlds, after having a good time with Brian Greene's Fabric of the Cosmos which I enjoyed a lot. I have also bought the novel Crime and Punishment which will be my first experience reading Dostoevsky but that will wait till I complete these.
I'm waiting for the arrival of Philokalia volume 4 in paperback and Markides' Mountain of Silence.
 

Alxandra

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Does anyone have this children's book? It looks lovely I'm thinking to order it for my younger cousins.

Has anyone ordered books from this website before?
http://www.stnectariospress.com/
 

methodius

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I don't think the CRA accepts feathers in payment.
[unless of course you're a politician and feathering your nest...]
 

Antonis

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Alxandra said:
Wounded by Love Elder Porphyrios
Likewise!

Also, the homilies of St Kosmas Aitolos.
 
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Right now I'm on the last chapter of Nihilism: The Root of the Revolution of the Modern Age by Fr. Seraphim Rose. I think this may be my favourite work by him.
 

Jonathan Gress

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Ανδρέας said:
Right now I'm on the last chapter of Nihilism: The Root of the Revolution of the Modern Age by Fr. Seraphim Rose. I think this may be my favourite work by him.
Better than Orthodoxy and the Religion of the Future? Will OC.net need to start recommending a new book?
 
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Jonathan Gress said:
Ανδρέας said:
Right now I'm on the last chapter of Nihilism: The Root of the Revolution of the Modern Age by Fr. Seraphim Rose. I think this may be my favourite work by him.
Better than Orthodoxy and the Religion of the Future? Will OC.net need to start recommending a new book?
While it has been years since I first read Orthodoxy and the Religion of the Future, I can't say that I remember enjoying it. Don't get me wrong, I think there's value to the book, but I also think that Fr. Seraphim often paints other faiths in a distorted manner within it. However, in Nihilism I believe he does a wonderful job of explaining the creation of the modern man, and why this in fact is something negative.
 

Jonathan Gress

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Ανδρέας said:
Jonathan Gress said:
Ανδρέας said:
Right now I'm on the last chapter of Nihilism: The Root of the Revolution of the Modern Age by Fr. Seraphim Rose. I think this may be my favourite work by him.
Better than Orthodoxy and the Religion of the Future? Will OC.net need to start recommending a new book?
While it has been years since I first read Orthodoxy and the Religion of the Future, I can't say that I remember enjoying it. Don't get me wrong, I think there's value to the book, but I also think that Fr. Seraphim often paints other faiths in a distorted manner within it. However, in Nihilism I believe he does a wonderful job of explaining the creation of the modern man, and why this in fact is something negative.
Fair enough. There just seems to be a running gag on OC.net where, every time somebody mentions Fr Seraphim, someone else responds (whether it's relevant or not) "I highly recommend Orthodoxy and the Religion of the Future". I expect somebody had been going round recommending this book to everyone and now it seems kind of funny.
 

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Ανδρέας said:
Right now I'm on the last chapter of Nihilism: The Root of the Revolution of the Modern Age by Fr. Seraphim Rose. I think this may be my favourite work by him.
I'm reading his short book now called, God's Revelation to the Human Heart.
 

Alpo

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Ανδρέας said:
Jonathan Gress said:
Ανδρέας said:
Right now I'm on the last chapter of Nihilism: The Root of the Revolution of the Modern Age by Fr. Seraphim Rose. I think this may be my favourite work by him.
Better than Orthodoxy and the Religion of the Future? Will OC.net need to start recommending a new book?
While it has been years since I first read Orthodoxy and the Religion of the Future, I can't say that I remember enjoying it. Don't get me wrong, I think there's value to the book, but I also think that Fr. Seraphim often paints other faiths in a distorted manner within it. However, in Nihilism I believe he does a wonderful job of explaining the creation of the modern man, and why this in fact is something negative.
I would strongly recommend Orthodoxy and the Religion of the Future by Fr. Seraphim Rose.
 
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Fair enough. There just seems to be a running gag on OC.net where, every time somebody mentions Fr Seraphim, someone else responds (whether it's relevant or not) "I highly recommend Orthodoxy and the Religion of the Future". I expect somebody had been going round recommending this book to everyone and now it seems kind of funny.
Well, I guess I just killed it.  ;)

I'm reading his short book now called, God's Revelation to the Human Heart.
Yes, I remember enjoying that one.
I would strongly recommend Orthodoxy and the Religion of the Future by Fr. Seraphim Rose.
Nevermind. It's back.
 

FinnJames

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John Behr, Becoming Human: Meditations on Christian Anthropology in Word and Image

A nice book to read once and keep coming back to. The art work, various typefaces and poetic prose invite meditative interaction with the text.

This would be a great gift to a Christian friend who wants to know what makes Orthodoxy different from other denominations.
 

wgw

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Heirs to Forgotten Kingdoms

This book by a British diplomat is a tour of the critically endangered eeligion's of the Middle East.  The Mamdaeams of Iraq, the Yazidis, the Copts, the Samaritans, and the Zoroastrians.  The Assyrian Christians are covered in a chapter on Detroit amusingly.

I started with the chapter on the Copts and found it thrilling.  I learned several things of use.

The author posited that the cenobitic monastery resembles the old pagan Egyptian temples in being a community of pious men supported by farming, maintaining a temple and visited by pilgrims.  I wonder how true this is.  There was much else of interest.  And now I know the proper name for Coptic beans.  The other chapters look promising.

When finished I might post a review.
 

Cyrillic

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A. Edward Siecienski  - The Authenticity of Maximus the Confessor's "Letter to Marinus": The Argument from Theological Consistency
 

LenInSebastopol

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Tom Dykstra's Hallowed Be Thy Name
Seems there was a dust up on Mt. Athos, 1912 or so.
 

Echa

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The Protestant's dilemma - devin rose
 

Gebre Menfes Kidus

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PEACEFUL NEIGHBOR: Discovering the Countercultural Mister Rogers by Michael G. Long

From the Introduction:

Although he is one of the most underappreciated peacemakers in U.S. history, Fred Rogers richly deserves a place in the pantheon of pacifists who tried to shake the foundations of society and culture. To the day of his death, he was a radical Christian pacifist - fervently committed to the end of violence and the presence of social justice in its full glory. The time has come for us to pull him out of the shadows so we can celebrate him just as he was - a fierce peacemaker.


Selam
 

Cyrillic

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Gebre Menfes Kidus said:
PEACEFUL NEIGHBOR: Discovering the Countercultural Mister Rogers by Michael G. Long

From the Introduction:

Although he is one of the most underappreciated peacemakers in U.S. history, Fred Rogers richly deserves a place in the pantheon of pacifists who tried to shake the foundations of society and culture. To the day of his death, he was a radical Christian pacifist - fervently committed to the end of violence and the presence of social justice in its full glory. The time has come for us to pull him out of the shadows so we can celebrate him just as he was - a fierce peacemaker.


Selam
Igitur qui desiderat pacem etc.
 

RobS

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Plato's Republic. Reading this at a pretty fast pace over my break from work. I don't think I have laughed this hard from reading in a long time, Socrates rules. He's gotta be the indispensable philosopher.

The only problem I have with reading this text, and from what I've read elsewhere of Plato, is that it's not as engaging as some of the contemporary philosophy I've read precisely because the latter is much more relevant. Someone like a Zizek really demonstrates the immediacy and enthusiasm that goes with thinking about our own lives.

Although of course I think philosophy starts with Socrates' apprisal that the life which is unexamined is not worth living.

Speaking of which, I read the Apology in High School and re-read it again a few weeks ago, amazed how differently it reads to me today from 10 years ago. I actually got a little teary eyed, here is the creation of what it means to be human and that dialogue should be the measure to judge all other succeeding philosophy by.
 

Cyrillic

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nothing said:
Speaking of which, I read the Apology in High School and re-read it again a few weeks ago, amazed how differently it reads to me today from 10 years ago. I actually got a little teary eyed, here is the creation of what it means to be human and that dialogue should be the measure to judge all other succeeding philosophy by.
Really? I can't help but laugh when reading the Apology. Socrates was trolling the Athenians big-time. The Phaedo is much more of a tear-jerker.
 

wgw

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Having finished Heis to Forgotten Kingdoms, a book on the endangered Minority faiths of the Middle East, I am now working on The Alliance of Divine Office by Hammon L'estrange, a poignant defence of the Anglican Liturgy against Non Conformist detractors.

I also want to push through more of the Philokalia this week, and I want to make more progress on The Typikon Decoded.

I'm also in the market for a good commemorative book on one of my favorite jetliners, the Vickers VC-10, which recently ended a 50 year career with the Royal Airforce.  I would also like to, while I'm at it, get a nice light anthology of classic SF, something along the lines of The Good Old Stuff edited by Gardner Dozois, which is a dazzling collection which introduced me at 14 to writers like Brian Aldiss, Jack Vance, A.E. van Vogt, Cordwainer Smith and James Tiptree Jr. (actually the psychologist Alice Sheldon in real life, who died tragically in a murder-suicide).
 

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wgw said:
Heirs to Forgotten Kingdoms

This book by a British diplomat is a tour of the critically endangered eeligion's of the Middle East.  The Mamdaeams of Iraq, the Yazidis, the Copts, the Samaritans, and the Zoroastrians.  The Assyrian Christians are covered in a chapter on Detroit amusingly.

I started with the chapter on the Copts and found it thrilling.  I learned several things of use.

The author posited that the cenobitic monastery resembles the old pagan Egyptian temples in being a community of pious men supported by farming, maintaining a temple and visited by pilgrims.  I wonder how true this is.  There was much else of interest.  And now I know the proper name for Coptic beans.  The other chapters look promising.

When finished I might post a review.
Is this a recent publication about the contemporary Middle East or a historical time period?
 

Volnutt

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I'm also in the market for a good commemorative book on one of my favorite jetliners, the Vickers VC-10, which recently ended a 50 year career with the Royal Airforce.
Huh. You and Fr. Laurent Cleenewerck. It's making me wonder if there's some connection between an interest in comparative liturgics and being a plane boffin. ;D
 

Volnutt

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Now that season one of CW's TV Flash series is over, I decided to reread Crisis on Infinite Earths. I think I'm finally getting a handle on that book's plot progression even if it still makes no logical sense lol.

I lost my copy of The Sorrows of Young Werther for about a month. I'll be done with it today.

Still working through the Epistles of St. Ignatius of Antioch.

Also, Stephen King's From a Buick 8.
 

wgw

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IreneOlinyk said:
wgw said:
Heirs to Forgotten Kingdoms

This book by a British diplomat is a tour of the critically endangered eeligion's of the Middle East.  The Mamdaeams of Iraq, the Yazidis, the Copts, the Samaritans, and the Zoroastrians.  The Assyrian Christians are covered in a chapter on Detroit amusingly.

I started with the chapter on the Copts and found it thrilling.  I learned several things of use.

The author posited that the cenobitic monastery resembles the old pagan Egyptian temples in being a community of pious men supported by farming, maintaining a temple and visited by pilgrims.  I wonder how true this is.  There was much else of interest.  And now I know the proper name for Coptic beans.  The other chapters look promising.

When finished I might post a review.
Is this a recent publication about the contemporary Middle East or a historical time period?
Very recent.  It was published last fall by a retired British diplomat.  It discusses the Mandaeans, Yazidis, Druze, Zoroastrians, Samaritans, Copts, a mountain religion in Pakistan, and a variety of displaced persons practicing their faith in Detroit.  It discusses the current plight faced by all of these religions.
 

wgw

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Volnutt said:
I'm also in the market for a good commemorative book on one of my favorite jetliners, the Vickers VC-10, which recently ended a 50 year career with the Royal Airforce.
Huh. You and Fr. Laurent Cleenewerck. It's making me wonder if there's some connection between an interest in comparative liturgics and being a plane boffin. ;D
Is he also into VC-10s?  I'm specifically an enthusiast of vintage airliners; fighters and General aviation aircraft bore me.  Bombers are kind of cool, but Imprefer airliners as they are better looking and less lethal.
 

LenInSebastopol

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Currently reading Nothing Is True and Everything is Possible: The Surreal Heart of the New Russian by Peter Pomerantsev which is a first hand account of Russia from the 1990s to about 2014.

Enjoyable, easy read too, as this Journalist/TV exec describes a whole economic, civil, social life of a country is piecemealed together after a quantifiable change/upset in it's post-communist structure.
Anecdotal incidents, interviews and observations used to paint a larger picture of "modern" Russia.
Also insightful to see our own country's ways of "influencing" us with our social structures.
 

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The Broken Icon: Intuitive Existentialism In Classical Russian Fiction, by Geoffrey Clive
 

Volnutt

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wgw said:
Volnutt said:
I'm also in the market for a good commemorative book on one of my favorite jetliners, the Vickers VC-10, which recently ended a 50 year career with the Royal Airforce.
Huh. You and Fr. Laurent Cleenewerck. It's making me wonder if there's some connection between an interest in comparative liturgics and being a plane boffin. ;D
Is he also into VC-10s?  I'm specifically an enthusiast of vintage airliners; fighters and General aviation aircraft bore me.  Bombers are kind of cool, but Imprefer airliners as they are better looking and less lethal.
I don't know. All I know is his website says he's going to be teaching a class on jetliners at EUCLID for some reason. I guess he really is an interdisciplinary scholar.
 
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