What is everyone reading?

William T

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Arachne said:
William T said:
Rereading and reading anew old hard boiled pulp: starting with Hammet's The Thin Man, following with Chandler's The Big Sleep (two of my favorite movies, never read the novels before though)
The Big Sleep is practically unrecognizable.
Intersting. I just watched To Have and Have Not, which I think I like more than Casablanca, but it was nothing like the Hemmingway novel from what I remember.  Interestingly, it was William Faulkner who did the script and rewrite.
 

William T

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Iconodule said:
Heart of Darkness again. Just perfection. Not bad for a guy who didn't speak English till his 20's.
I was thinking of making a thread along the lines of "what we read in school"....I couldn't remember if this was an assigned book or not.  I know I read it and loved it, I'm not sure if I did it on my own.  Regardless, it should be a standard assigned to boys somewhere during 6th-9th grade.
 

Iconodule

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William T said:
Iconodule said:
Heart of Darkness again. Just perfection. Not bad for a guy who didn't speak English till his 20's.
I was thinking of making a thread along the lines of "what we read in school"....I couldn't remember if this was an assigned book or not.  I know I read it and loved it, I'm not sure if I did it on my own.  Regardless, it should be a standard assigned to boys somewhere during 6th-9th grade.
I had to read it in 12th grade but was not in the right mindset to appreciate it unfortunately. That was generally the case with a lot of assigned books for me.
 

Iconodule

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William T said:
Iconodule said:
William T said:
Rereading and reading anew old hard boiled pulp: starting with Hammet's The Thin Man, following with Chandler's The Big Sleep (two of my favorite movies, never read the novels before though)
I read The Long Goodbye years ago, don't remember much but I wholly enjoyed it.
same here, that was one impetus that drove me to this, the other was going through a film noir movie kick. I think I also have something in my head telling me that the 1930's were one of the better decades for Hollywood, and working with literature like this is one reason why.
Another book I enjoyed along these lines was Cornell Woolrich's Rendezvous in Black which, as far as I know, has never been filmed (some of his other books were).

I love noir films. My favorites tend to be on the later end (40's to late 50's). Double Indemnity, Nightmare Alley, Gun Crazy, Out of the Past...
 

AntoniousNikolas

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William T said:
Rereading and reading anew old hard boiled pulp: starting with Hammet's The Thin Man, following with Chandler's The Big Sleep (two of my favorite movies, never read the novels before though)
Nice!  I'm doing a Hammett re-read-a-thon myself.  I've just finished Red Harvest,, The Dain Curse, and The Maltese Falcon.  Working my way through The Glass Key right now and The Thin Man is next on my list.  I'll go back the Chandler after that.

Arachne said:
William T said:
Rereading and reading anew old hard boiled pulp: starting with Hammet's The Thin Man, following with Chandler's The Big Sleep (two of my favorite movies, never read the novels before though)
The Big Sleep is practically unrecognizable.
The book and the film each of their own charm.  Bogart's performance is one of the best of his career.  He embodies Marlowe.

Iconodule said:
William T said:
Rereading and reading anew old hard boiled pulp: starting with Hammet's The Thin Man, following with Chandler's The Big Sleep (two of my favorite movies, never read the novels before though)
I read The Long Goodbye years ago, don't remember much but I wholly enjoyed it.
+1

Farewell, My Lovely is also excellent.

William T said:
I think I also have something in my head telling me that the 1930's were one of the better decades for Hollywood, and working with literature like this is one reason why.
+1

Iconodule said:
William T said:
Iconodule said:
William T said:
Rereading and reading anew old hard boiled pulp: starting with Hammet's The Thin Man, following with Chandler's The Big Sleep (two of my favorite movies, never read the novels before though)
I read The Long Goodbye years ago, don't remember much but I wholly enjoyed it.
same here, that was one impetus that drove me to this, the other was going through a film noir movie kick. I think I also have something in my head telling me that the 1930's were one of the better decades for Hollywood, and working with literature like this is one reason why.
Another book I enjoyed along these lines was Cornell Woolrich's Rendezvous in Black which, as far as I know, has never been filmed (some of his other books were).

I love noir films. My favorites tend to be on the later end (40's to late 50's). Double Indemnity, Nightmare Alley, Gun Crazy, Out of the Past...
You are a man of refined taste.
 

WPM

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Just skimming through and reading OC.net at a quick glance.
 

WPM

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scamandrius said:
Mor Ephrem said:
scamandrius said:
Iconodule said:
scamandrius said:
Iconodule said:
I like the content but the translation itself is terribly wooden IMO. It serves in my mind as a prime example of how neo-Elizabethan prose is not necessarily more musical or poetic than contemporary English.
And you would translate it better?  How many languages do you know and/or conversant in?
Since when is translation an excuse for poor English style? Or are you saying Saint Ephraim's originals are badly written too?
Since you failed to answer the question I put to you I'm going to assume the answer is zero.  I just love how people who do not know any language other than their own feel that they can just complain about translations as if they know jack squat as to what goes into translation be it from  Syriac to Greek, Greek to Russian,Russian to English (as in the case with this particular Psalter) or German to Swahili, Hebrew to Chinese, etc.
I know Syriac, have helped translate liturgical texts into English for the Church, and I agree with Iconodule.
Your credentials/background  are not in question. Iconodule's are. He doesn't have a good basis for which to frame an opinion, any opinion on translation.  If he simply commented upon the English style (which is a different basis of criticism), fine and dandy. But, since he took issue with translation, I called him out on his lack of expertise.  I believe you have done the same for me on a number of occasions (justified and not).
I think you frame your opinion by research an testing thoughts or ideas.
 

Iconodule

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Listened to an audiobook with the wife of Neil Gaiman's tale, "The Truth is a Cave in the Black Mountains," read by Gaiman himself. Highly recommended; some of his best work.
 

Arachne

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Iconodule said:
Listened to an audiobook with the wife of Neil Gaiman's tale, "The Truth is a Cave in the Black Mountains," read by Gaiman himself. Highly recommended; some of his best work.
I don't think I've found a piece of Amanda Palmer's work, musical or writing, that I didn't enjoy. And Gaiman could build a career on the side as audiobook narrator. His entire Graveyard Book recording is available on YouTube.
 

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The Art of Prayer for nonfiction, The Odyssey as translated by Robert Fagles for fiction.
 

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Iconodule said:
Heart of Darkness again. Just perfection. Not bad for a guy who didn't speak English till his 20's.
Heart of Darkness is wonderful. Writing, that is.
 

Arachne

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Gaiman is about to jump the queue again (and in the meantime, the library will have secured Larrington for me).

https://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/books/neil-gaimans-suspenseful-and-surprising-norse-mythology/2017/02/13/986c0ffe-eef2-11e6-9973-c5efb7ccfb0d_story.html?tid=pm_entertainment_pop
 

Asteriktos

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Recently/currently...

Blood of Elves, by Andrzej Sapkowski (I still find myself unable to get into his writing)
The Alexiad, Anna Comnena
Evidence and Inquiry: Towards Reconstruction in Epistemology, by Susan Haack
The Experience of God: Being, Consciousness, Bliss, by David Bentley Hart (I seem to be getting more from it the 2nd time through)
 

Iconodule

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Re-read "The White People," by Arthur Machen and "Count Magnus" by MR James, two of the greatest horror stories.
 

William T

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So:  Big Sleep was great.  Just as good as the movie, but very different.  I like the Thin Man movie better than the book.  Maybe because I have a man crush on William Powell and a real crush on Myrna Loy.
 

Asteriktos

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The Fifty-Year Mission: The Next 25 Years, From the Next Generation to J.J. Abrams, by Mark Altman and Edward Gross
 

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I recently read something about Thomas Jefferson and the Pirates of Tripoli

The treaty of Tripoli is famous because it was signed by the majority of the founding fathers of the United States of America, and declares explicitly that the United States is "not a Christian nation".

The book talked about how the pirates of Tripoli increased the cost of insurance for the United States, and about the beginning of the US Navy.

Apparently the USA could have done much better (the author blames an over-zealous diplomat).
 

AntoniousNikolas

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mcarmichael said:
The treaty of Tripoli is famous because it was signed by the majority of the founding fathers of the United States of America, and declares explicitly that the United States is "not a Christian nation".
Fascinating!  So much for the mythos.  ;D

Please elaborate.  Can you post the quote in context?
 

Asteriktos

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Women in Purple: Rulers of Medieval Byzantium, by Judith Herrin

About the Emperesses St. Irene (d. 803), Euphrosyne (d. c. 836), and St. Theodora (d. c. 867)
 

scamandrius

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Asteriktos said:
Women in Purple: Rulers of Medieval Byzantium, by Judith Herrin

About the Emperesses St. Irene (d. 803), Euphrosyne (d. c. 836), and St. Theodora (d. c. 867)
Judith Herrin is a quality author.
 

Arachne

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Most elusive book I've ever hunted down. The hunt is up, thanks to OpenLibrary.
 

Asteriktos

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The Sculptor and His Stone: Selected Readings on Hellenistic and Christian Learning and Thought in the Early Greek Fathers
 

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The diary of Happiness - Father Nicolae Steinhardt
Martin Eden - Jack London
Fragile Things - Neil Gaiman
 

Asteriktos

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I'm kind of dreading reading two Evangelicals doing Bible canon apologetics, but lots of people praise this one, so I'm giving it a shot.
 

RaphaCam

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Studying diligently Categories, by Aristotle. We're building a very nice study group and agreed to start by this piece of awesome.

I can't stop thinking in his own terms, now I see his ten categories in sentences with the same passion I saw grammatical structures when I fell in love with my own language lol
 

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I've been given a copy of the Shack, with the comment that it's an amazing book and i will love it. I haven't started reading it yet, just dipping in and out but the prose looks utterly turgid. Is there something of worth in it, because i am not really inclined to wade through the writing if not.
 

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foszoe said:
Orthodoxy and Modern Physics
Washington State University physicists have created a fluid with negative mass, which is exactly what it sounds like.
....
Hypothetically, matter can have negative mass in the same sense that an electric charge can be either negative or positive. People rarely think in these terms, and our everyday world sees only the positive aspects of Isaac Newton's Second Law of Motion, in which a force is equal to the mass of an object times its acceleration, or F=ma. In other words, if you push an object, it will accelerate in the direction you're pushing it. Mass will accelerate in the direction of the force.

"That's what most things that we're used to do," said Forbes, hinting at the bizarreness to come. "With negative mass, if you push something, it accelerates toward you."
 

Asteriktos

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Lest Darkness Fall, by L. Sprague de Camp

The author seems to have a typically negative view of Constantinople/Justinian, and I'm not so sure about his terminology sometimes (someone self-identifies as a monophysite), but overall it's been a lot of fun.
 
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