What is everyone reading?

Jetavan

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The Russian Cosmists: The Esoteric Futurism of Nikolai Federov and His Followers

"Suppressed during the Soviet period and little noticed in the West, the ideas of the Cosmists have in recent decades been rediscovered and embraced by many Russian intellectuals and are now recognized as essential to a native Russian cultural and intellectual tradition. Although they were scientists, theologians, and philosophers, the Cosmists addressed topics traditionally confined to occult and esoteric literature. Major themes include the indefinite extension of the human life span to establish universal immortality; the restoration of life to the dead; the reconstitution of the human organism to enable future generations to live beyond earth; the regulation of nature to bring all manifestations of blind natural force under rational human control; the transition of our biosphere into a "noosphere," with a sheath of mental activity surrounding the planet; the effect of cosmic rays and currently unrecognized particles of energy on human history; practical steps toward the reversal and eventual human control over the flow of time; and the virtues of human androgyny, autotrophy, and invisibility."
 

Iconodule

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Jetavan said:
The Russian Cosmists: The Esoteric Futurism of Nikolai Federov and His Followers

"Suppressed during the Soviet period and little noticed in the West, the ideas of the Cosmists have in recent decades been rediscovered and embraced by many Russian intellectuals and are now recognized as essential to a native Russian cultural and intellectual tradition. Although they were scientists, theologians, and philosophers, the Cosmists addressed topics traditionally confined to occult and esoteric literature. Major themes include the indefinite extension of the human life span to establish universal immortality; the restoration of life to the dead; the reconstitution of the human organism to enable future generations to live beyond earth; the regulation of nature to bring all manifestations of blind natural force under rational human control; the transition of our biosphere into a "noosphere," with a sheath of mental activity surrounding the planet; the effect of cosmic rays and currently unrecognized particles of energy on human history; practical steps toward the reversal and eventual human control over the flow of time; and the virtues of human androgyny, autotrophy, and invisibility."
They sound like proto-Extropians.
 

Jetavan

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Iconodule said:
Jetavan said:
The Russian Cosmists: The Esoteric Futurism of Nikolai Federov and His Followers

"Suppressed during the Soviet period and little noticed in the West, the ideas of the Cosmists have in recent decades been rediscovered and embraced by many Russian intellectuals and are now recognized as essential to a native Russian cultural and intellectual tradition. Although they were scientists, theologians, and philosophers, the Cosmists addressed topics traditionally confined to occult and esoteric literature. Major themes include the indefinite extension of the human life span to establish universal immortality; the restoration of life to the dead; the reconstitution of the human organism to enable future generations to live beyond earth; the regulation of nature to bring all manifestations of blind natural force under rational human control; the transition of our biosphere into a "noosphere," with a sheath of mental activity surrounding the planet; the effect of cosmic rays and currently unrecognized particles of energy on human history; practical steps toward the reversal and eventual human control over the flow of time; and the virtues of human androgyny, autotrophy, and invisibility."
They sound like proto-Extropians.
I think Teilhard was influenced by the Cosmists.

"To Fedorov and most of the religious Cosmists (Solovyov the exception), Catholicism stands for unity without freedom, Protestantism for freedom without unity, and Orthodoxy for sobornost', the synthesis of freedom and unity, wholeness, communality, spiritual consensus" (p. 35).
 

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Our priest gave me a book yesterday 'The Saint of the Prisons' about Valeriu Gafencu, who was imprisoned under the Communists in Aiud and then Pitești (famous for the brainwashing experiments) before eventually dying in Târgu Ocna. I've only read the first couple of chapters so far but it's very interesting, particularly because it contains extracts from his own letters as well as testimonies from those who knew him in prison.

James
 

vamrat

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Sharpe's Tiger.  I've read them all once.  Starting again.
 

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vamrat said:
Sharpe's Tiger.  I've read them all once.  Starting again.
Good choice.  I just got the latest Bernard Cornwell novel, 'Death of Kings'  from his Saxon Chronicles series from the library and am looking forward to delving into it soon.  I just finished plodding through Elizabeth Kostova's "The Swan Thieves" and am now reading "The Murder Room: The Heirs of Sherlock Holmes Gather to Solve the World's Most Perplexing Cold Cases" by Michael Capuzzo which his, thankfully, a quick read so I can get started on that latest adventures of Uhtred!
 

vamrat

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Schultz said:
vamrat said:
Sharpe's Tiger.  I've read them all once.  Starting again.
Good choice.  I just got the latest Bernard Cornwell novel, 'Death of Kings'  from his Saxon Chronicles series from the library and am looking forward to delving into it soon.  I just finished plodding through Elizabeth Kostova's "The Swan Thieves" and am now reading "The Murder Room: The Heirs of Sherlock Holmes Gather to Solve the World's Most Perplexing Cold Cases" by Michael Capuzzo which his, thankfully, a quick read so I can get started on that latest adventures of Uhtred!
I read his four Civil War books and was kind of sad that he didn't go past Sharpsburg.  I read Agincourt and loved it but didn't get far into the other-English-Longbowman-looks-for-the-Grail series.  He is a very good author so if I get the chance I will look into his Arthur/Dark Ages stories.  I love the Sharpe series even though you have the whole Sharpe always wins, kills the bad guy, gets the girl thing, he does vary it up and while you know Sharpe will always come out on top he does get some major setbacks and loses many friends along the way...just not Harper.  he always lives as well!
 

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Daily Life in the Byzantine Empire / Marcus Rautman
 

Ansgar

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Tommelomsky said:
Ansgar said:
Tommelomsky said:
The Orthodox Way (in danish) by Bishop Kallistos Ware.
It doesn't exist in norwegian?
Not that i know of. Danish is ok, even if there are some words I cannot understand.
That's funny, because we get most of our orthodox litterature from Norway.
 

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Interesting. We have a label here that publishes orthodox writings and think i will contact the priest that runs things when it comes to orthodox books.
 

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John of Damascus: Writings on Islam, The Orthodox Faith, Homilies on the Nativity and the Dormition of the Theotokos
Eusebius of Cæsarea: Ecclesiastical History
 

stavros_388

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Finished reading most of Atheist Delusions, by David Bentley Hart. What a writer! However, I kind of skipped over much of the history in the middle. But I own it, so I can go back to it if I want to later.

Just started reading a Kindle sample of Where the Conflict Really Lies: Science, Religion, and Naturalism, by Alvin Platinga. Seems really interesting.

Has anyone here read it? Is it worth a read?
 

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Miss Emily's Fire by Archbishop Chrysostomos

I've long been an admirer of Emily Dickinson, so I was excited to see that an Orthodox (albeit schismatic) bishop had published an essay examining how her poetry aligns with Orthodox spirituality. I was hoping that a man knowledgeable in Orthodoxy might be able to unlock some of the more esoteric language in Dickinson's work from a fresh angle. Unfortunately, about half of this very short book is taken up with biographical details and general scholarly information that could be easily found elsewhere, and which was largely unnecessary to the author's purpose. What remains is an analysis of a very small portion of Dickinson's work which is rather vague and inconclusive. The book only cost me $5 but I think +Chrysostomos should have just put the thing for free online if this was all he could come up with.  
 

Achronos

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So I got to the controversial section regarding Sancho's donkey and wow Grossman, IMO, made a mistake of not including what happened with Giles. It does not flow at all, and sure she adds footnotes but it doesn't work. Her methodology was criticszed by Tom Lathrop only using one source, the Riquer, and assuming that is the one to base it on. When the first edition was printed I am told only 70 copies survived. The subsequent editions suffer from editors correcting intentional mistakes and even inserting texts thinking they were more clever than Cervantes.

Nonetheless I think Lathrop makes a great argument in regards to the translation and how difficult it is because the book is so controversial.

I just ordered the Lathrop edition (that makes 3 translations I have) but too bad the illustrations from Jack Davis is out of print.

I don't think I could stand Grossman's translation any longer.

All this work I might as well learn Spanish.
 

Achronos

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stavros_388 said:
Finished reading most of Atheist Delusions, by David Bentley Hart. What a writer! However, I kind of skipped over much of the history in the middle. But I own it, so I can go back to it if I want to later.

Just started reading a Kindle sample of Where the Conflict Really Lies: Science, Religion, and Naturalism, by Alvin Platinga. Seems really interesting.

Has anyone here read it? Is it worth a read?
I like Platinga alot, great theologian. Hart is awesome and thankfully does not engage in alot of sophistry. orthonormie would cringe at that atheist book however.
 
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