What is everyone reading?

Iconodule

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Iconodule said:
Asteriktos said:
orthonorm said:
Arachne said:
Reading Lolita in Tehran, by Azar Nafisi. 60 pages in, it's fascinating.
Sounds like a text born from a title. Never heard of it, but I could probably write a synopsis of it anyway.

Do the chapters like the title (or it is too sophisticated to have chapters and has sections or worse yet, scenes) allude to "Western" works or authors who offer petite bourgeois "revolution"?

And I am going to guess it is a memoir. I don't know Arabic, so I am also going to guess it is a woman. Life before, during, after revolution? Is she a Professor and decided to become some sort of self-exiled voice of freedom and the true Iran?

We had some professors like that at the Universities I went to. I love folks who are self-exiled.

Anyway, sounds awful. At least my version. I am going to stop thinking about it now. Let me know, if I am wrong.
You're such a curmudgeon  :p
From the Amazon blurb:

Every Thursday morning for two years in the Islamic Republic of Iran, a bold and inspired teacher named Azar Nafisi secretly gathered seven of her most committed female students to read forbidden Western classics. As Islamic morality squads staged arbitrary raids in Tehran, fundamentalists seized hold of the universities, and a blind censor stifled artistic expression, the girls in Azar Nafisi’s living room risked removing their veils and immersed themselves in the worlds of Jane Austen, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Henry James, and Vladimir Nabokov. In this extraordinary memoir, their stories become intertwined with the ones they are reading. Reading Lolita in Tehran is a remarkable exploration of resilience in the face of tyranny and a celebration of the liberating power of literature.
From the Wikipedia entry:

Nafisi left Iran on June 24, 1997 and moved to the United States, where she wrote Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books, a book where she describes her experiences as a secular woman living and working in the Islamic Republic of Iran. In the book, she declares "I left Iran, but Iran did not leave me."

Nafisi has held the post of a visiting fellow and lecturer at the Foreign Policy Institute of Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) in Washington, DC and has served on the Board of Trustees of Freedom House, a United States nongovernmental organization (NGO) which conducts research and advocacy on democracy.[8]
 

vamrat

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Sharpe's Prey.  Next - Master and Commander, until I get Sharpe's Rifles back from my homeboy.
 

orthonorm

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Iconodule said:
Asteriktos said:
orthonorm said:
Arachne said:
Reading Lolita in Tehran, by Azar Nafisi. 60 pages in, it's fascinating.
Sounds like a text born from a title. Never heard of it, but I could probably write a synopsis of it anyway.

Do the chapters like the title (or it is too sophisticated to have chapters and has sections or worse yet, scenes) allude to "Western" works or authors who offer petite bourgeois "revolution"?

And I am going to guess it is a memoir. I don't know Arabic, so I am also going to guess it is a woman. Life before, during, after revolution? Is she a Professor and decided to become some sort of self-exiled voice of freedom and the true Iran?

We had some professors like that at the Universities I went to. I love folks who are self-exiled.

Anyway, sounds awful. At least my version. I am going to stop thinking about it now. Let me know, if I am wrong.
You're such a curmudgeon  :p
From the Amazon blurb:

Every Thursday morning for two years in the Islamic Republic of Iran, a bold and inspired teacher named Azar Nafisi secretly gathered seven of her most committed female students to read forbidden Western classics. As Islamic morality squads staged arbitrary raids in Tehran, fundamentalists seized hold of the universities, and a blind censor stifled artistic expression, the girls in Azar Nafisi’s living room risked removing their veils and immersed themselves in the worlds of Jane Austen, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Henry James, and Vladimir Nabokov. In this extraordinary memoir, their stories become intertwined with the ones they are reading. Reading Lolita in Tehran is a remarkable exploration of resilience in the face of tyranny and a celebration of the liberating power of literature.
LOL!  Didn't they make this into a comic book then a cartoon movie*? I can't tell pained exiled Iranians apart.





*I did see the cartoon movie. I remember finding it a little interesting while being wildly manipulative.
 

orthonorm

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Jetavan said:
Always been worried this is holopr0n. Let me know in the unlikely event it ain't.

My Father Bleeds History doesn't bode well for its ability to rise above holocash market.
 

Asteriktos

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A curmudgeon who is right? Those are the worst kind!
 

vamrat

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Jetavan said:
orthonorm said:
Jetavan said:
Always been worried this is holopr0n. Let me know in the unlikely event it ain't.

My Father Bleeds History doesn't bode well for its ability to rise above holocash market.
Do you consider Wiesel's Night to be holopr0n?
It's the worst.  It and Anne Frank's Diary.

But I usually don't read the articles. 

Schindler's List is where it's at, but that'd be on another thread.
 

biro

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[quote author=orthonorm]
Always been worried this is holopr0n. Let me know in the unlikely event it ain't.

My Father Bleeds History doesn't bode well for its ability to rise above holocash market.
[/quote]

I'd jump out the window at some of the crap people post here, but I live on the first floor. I'd wind up with a small bruise and slightly rumpled hair.

When what I really want to do is vomit.
 

Asteriktos

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Camus: A Collection of Critical Essays, by Germaine Bree
Camus, by Germaine Bree
 

stavros_388

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Taking a crack at The Arena, by Bishop Ignatius Brianchaninov.

I'm a little intimidated, and hope it inspires more than discourages me.
 

Asteriktos

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stavros_388 said:
Taking a crack at The Arena, by Bishop Ignatius Brianchaninov.

I'm a little intimidated, and hope it inspires more than discourages me.
Fwiw I remember liking it and not being discouraged; hope you enjoy it!
 
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