What is everyone reading?

BrotherAidan

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Αριστοκλής said:
Started and finished J.D. Salinger's Franny and Zooey yesterday. My sister sent it to me and insisted I read it (the Jesus Prayer is central to the book, sort of).

I took a break from the 'Big D' -Dostoevsky - but am returning to him tonight.
I just read about that book today in a book I am reading (by an author who is an English professor/poet, and orthodox layman who went to Mt. Athos - can't remember the title cause it's real long)
 

Ebor

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American History in the 1815-1824 period; the latest Naomi Novak "Temeraire" book Empire of Ivory; a study of Japanese literature in the medieval period; "Usagi Yojimbo" and others depending on where I am. (doesn't everyone have books in progress in different places?  :D )

Ebor
 

EofK

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Just finished Yarn Harlot (sort of a memoir/rant from an obsessive knitter) and have started Snow Flower and the Secret Fan.  It's a story of two Chinese women using a secret language known only to Chinese women.  Pretty interested so far, though I could have done without the description of footbinding.
 

Carpatho Russian

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I'm in the process of reading Being as Communion by John Zizioulas.  I've just started 1453 The Holy War for Constantinople and the Clash of Islam and the West by Roger Crowley.  And for fun, I'm reading Rumpole and the Penge Bungalow Murders by John Mortimer.
 

Heorhij

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Αριστοκλής said:
Started and finished J.D. Salinger's Franny and Zooey yesterday. My sister sent it to me and insisted I read it (the Jesus Prayer is central to the book, sort of).
.
I love "Franny and Zooey." It's funny that Salinger is always associated in people's minds with his "Catcher in the Rye," while I believe his Glass saga is so much more mature and interesting.

I haven't been reading any fiction for quite a while, sorry... My last week's reading was all psychology and pedagogy - excerpts from a book by Lev Vygotsky and Alexander Luria, titled, "Ape. Primitive. Child."
 

aserb

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"Havana - Autobiography of a City"

Fascinating and another in my run of historical novels set around cities. SO far this year I ahve done Bethlehem and Jaffa
 

ozgeorge

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"11th Month, 11th Day, 11th Hour- Armistice Day 1918, World War I and Its Violent Climax" by Joseph E. Persico

It's a collection of military archives, public records, private journal entries and letters dated 11/11/1918 which gives an extraordinary insight into the lives of British, French, American and German soldiers in the trenches on the first Armistice Day. For example, Adolf Hitler was in hospital on that day, and when he heard that Germany had surrendered, he went blind, and his medical record for the day shows a Berlin Psychiatrist's entry which described the patient as "a psychopath with hysterical symptoms".
What struck me the most was the private letters of the soldiers, especially when describing the senseless and pointless fighting which took place in the last few hours of the war.
 

Ebor

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ozgeorge said:
"11th Month, 11th Day, 11th Hour- Armistice Day 1918, World War I and Its Violent Climax" by Joseph E. Persico

It's a collection of military archives, public records, private journal entries and letters dated 11/11/1918 which gives an extraordinary insight into the lives of British, French, American and German soldiers in the trenches on the first Armistice Day. For example, Adolf Hitler was in hospital on that day, and when he heard that Germany had surrendered, he went blind, and his medical record for the day shows a Berlin Psychiatrist's entry which described the patient as "a psychopath with hysterical symptoms".
What struck me the most was the private letters of the soldiers, especially when describing the senseless and pointless fighting which took place in the last few hours of the war.
That sounds like a very interesting book.  I'm going to look for it.

I'm reading more of my American History class text. We're up to 1820-1840. Also "Nausicaa" by Miyazaki, a volume of ranch recollections by a Montana author.

Ebor
 

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A book that I'm working on now, that I think most here would also enjoy is Nikolai Leskov's On the Edge of the World.  It is about a missionary bishop in Siberia.  It reads sort of as a cross of Jack London and Death Comes for the Archbishop

From the back cover:
The purpose behind the bishop's journey is to teach and baptize.  During the process he learns through example and suffering that Baptism without preparation is ritual devoid fo content, that in indigenous peoples of all cultures there is a striking dignity, as well as established codes of moral behavior that must be recognized and built upon as a foundation for all Christian conversion.
 

ignatius

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On The Incarnation by St. Athanasius (St. Vladimir's Seminary Press)

Eusebius: The Church History translation and commentary by Paul L. Maier

Tradition, Scripture, and Interpretation: A Source-book of the Ancient Church Edited by D.H. Williams

God Bless!  :)
 

Heorhij

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Mikhail Bakhtin's essay on Rabelais (sorry guys, in Russian: http://www.philosophy.ru/library/bahtin/rable.html - Nektarios and Young Fogey will certainly appreciate, and others, but, unfortunately, not all). What a great philosopher, thinker, wow... (I mean Bakhtin, although Rabelais is of course a great philosopher as well.)
 

Athanasios

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Hello,

Primarily, I am reading textbooks right now.

I am also reading the Complete Works of Saint John of the Cross and the Holy Bible (cover to cover, on Judges now).

After the semester, I probably throw a couple other theology and/or Church Fathers on the pile (I can read 3 - 4 books at a time).

I am not much for fiction, but I'll occasionally read some Shakespeare, Dickens, poetry, etc.

I'll do that for a month, and then back to reading more textbooks.
 

wynd

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I am taking a break from theological stuff for a while. I just finished the book Forrest Gump. It's good, but completely different from the movie (in a good way).
 

PeterTheAleut

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Papers and Minutes from the Unofficial Consultation Between Theologians of the Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox Churches (August 11-15, 1964)
 

JoeS

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Life of Moses/ by Gregory of Nyssa/ Paulist Press

The Fathers of the Church/ St. John Chrysostom Homilies on Genesis/ Catholic University Press.

JoeS
 

Andrew21091

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I'm currently a quarter way through Father Seraphim Rose:His Life and Works. It is a very interesting read.
 

EofK

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Fr. Seraphim Rose is indeed an interesting figure. 

I'm currently working on Bill Bryson's The Lost Continent: Travels in Small Town America
 

Robert W

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I have borrowed the first ever work on Orthodoxy in Swedish I have come across:
"Min Ortodoxa tro" (My Orthodox faith) by Johannes Seppälä.

It's a relief to read a real book instead of all the "Internet-Orthodoxy".

I'm also reading the Heraldica Fennica ;)
 

Eugenio

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"Orality and Literacy" by Fr. Walter Ong (1982).

A fantastic read. It points out how our very consciousness has changed as a result of moving from an oral to a print culture - and the last points out how this affected Western Christendom as well.
 

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JoeZollars said:
This is just a thread to ask what everyone is reading.  Till Wendsday I will be reading nothing other than textbooks, but after that---ooh man do I ever have a stack to get through.  As soon as I am done with my finals, I am making it top priority to finish Law of God.

Joe Zollars
An Inconvenient Book, Glenn Beck
 

Ian Lazarus

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Tea leaves.  This one says "Made in China".  Big surprise there. ;)
 

scamandrius

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Eugenio said:
"Orality and Literacy" by Fr. Walter Ong (1982).

A fantastic read. It points out how our very consciousness has changed as a result of moving from an oral to a print culture - and the last points out how this affected Western Christendom as well.
Wow.  I read that when I was in grad school when I was taking a bunch of courses on oral tradition.  If I may suggest, Eugenio, a few other titles you may wish to read in relation to Ong.

1)  Albert Lord, The Singer of Tales
2)  John M. Foley, The Theory of Oral Composition
3)  John M. Foley, Oral Tradition

Dr. Foley, a professor of mine at the University of MIssouri is one of the leading authorities on oral tradition in the world (he writes a new book on the subject about every 2 years) and was a student of Lord, who, in turn was a student of Milman Parry, whose doctoral dissertation back in 1928 laid the groundwork for the Iliad as an oral poem which then precipitated a number of studies on oral poetry.  Lord went to the former Yugoslavia for some practical field work in that area, but now, the study of oral composition has become almost universal.  The poetry-myths of Tibet, the near/far East, Native American Culture, Africa are now all being actively engaged for study of this wonderful phenomenon.
 

Heorhij

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Just discovered a new (for me) old author-historian, a Russian named Boris Bashilov. (For those who read Russian, several of his books are published online in the XRONOS library, http://www.hrono.info/literatura.html ) Most unusual experience: Bashilov makes a very thorough revision of the entire history of the Russian state, beginning from the 13-th century (St. Alexander Nevsky) all the way to almost our times (he died in emigration, in Argentina, in 1970). Through and through, he keeps bashing what he calls "inobesie," the invasion of foreign hostile forces, mostly Freemasonic, into the course of Russian history. While I do realize that Bashilov's take on history is most subjective and even bordering on weird, it was very interesting for me to read Bashilov's sharply negative evaluation of some figures that I was indoctrinated to take as positive (e.g., Nikita Zotov, Lefort, P. Gordon, count Osterman, Antioch Kantemir, Sumarokov, Emperor Alexander I), and his generous praise of those whom I have been always used to take as negative (e.g. Emperors Paul I and Nicholas I).
 

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The upheavel of a move to Australia seems to have left me thoroughly happy, but mentally exhausted. As a consequence, I have given up struggling to read anything that even hints of effort. I am presently reading "The Chronicles of Chrestomanci", Volumes 1 and 2, by Diana Wynne Jones. I've only recently discovered Jones, (a student of both C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien) who is the very imaginative author of "Howl's Moving Castle" and many, many more.

The two books of the chronicles contain a total of four stories and are set (quoting the blurb on the back cover) "In the multiple parallel universe of the Twelve Related Worlds, only an enchanter with nine lives is powerful enough to control the rampant misuse of magic - and to hold the title Chrestomanci..."

The first book is such a thoroughly enjoyable read, I have ordered more. 

God be with us all.





 

Ebor

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Diana Wynne Jones is wonderful.  I met her once at a Science Fiction convention outside of Boston years and years ago.  She can be quite funny, too.  I recommend the "Tough Guide to Fantasy" a volume set up like a travel guide book that has entries on the various common peoples, themes and items in fantasy books.  Then there's "Dirk of Darkholm" (sp?) which is sent in a world where "tours" from our world come through a la fantasy novels and Dirk, a nice familyman wizard is chosen to be that year's "Dark Lord" and his wife is to be the "Sorceress".

Where did you move to Australia *from*?

I was reading Civil War history for the last week of my class, and now I'll be going over the text before taking the final exam.

Ebor
 

Riddikulus

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Ebor said:
Diana Wynne Jones is wonderful.  I met her once at a Science Fiction convention outside of Boston years and years ago.  She can be quite funny, too.  I recommend the "Tough Guide to Fantasy" a volume set up like a travel guide book that has entries on the various common peoples, themes and items in fantasy books.  Then there's "Dirk of Darkholm" (sp?) which is sent in a world where "tours" from our world come through a la fantasy novels and Dirk, a nice familyman wizard is chosen to be that year's "Dark Lord" and his wife is to be the "Sorceress".
I agree, her stories are wildly imaginative and humourous. I'm obviously going to be a great fan. I've already ordered Howl's Moving Castle and Conrad's Fate. A friend has suggested the "Tough Guide to Fantasy", which sounds like an interesting read, so I will probably get that next.

Having finished the first two books in one, I'm finding more and more of Diana Wynne Jones' "influence" in the Harry Potter books. I read somewhere that DWJ has noticed this, too. 

Where did you move to Australia *from*?
I consider myself fortunate enough to be part of the "great exodus" from New Zealand; along with hubby and cat/deity, who doesn't seem to be quite over the fact that Egyptians worshipped his kind.  ;D

The really great thing is that our younger daughter, her hubby and six kids moved with us. Had they not wanted to make the move as much as we did, we would still be in the "Land of the Long Grey Cloud".

God be with you.
 

EofK

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Re-reading The Silmarillion after watching all three extended edition Lord of the Rings films. 
 

Ian Lazarus

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"The Zombie Survival Guide" for spiritual enlightenment.

And for light reading, "Moby Dick"
 
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Ian Lazarus said:
"The Zombie Survival Guide" for spiritual enlightenment.

And for light reading, "Moby Dick"
:laugh:

Ah, yes, Moby Dick, where Ishmael cuddles with Queequeg all night long and then the seamen blissfully squeeze sperm (oil) all day.....My college class had lots of fun with that book.
 

PeterTheAleut

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Nyssa The Hobbit said:
:laugh:

Ah, yes, Moby Dick, where Ishmael cuddles with Queequeg all night long and then the seamen blissfully squeeze sperm (oil) all day.....My college class had lots of fun with that book.
I can see how the guys would get a lot of perverse glee out of this.  YIKES! :eek:
 

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Well, the title alone can be shocking to the unprepared mind.  I believe in future generations, it shall be called Mobey Richard
 

Heorhij

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I've been savouring Pushkin's "History of Peter I" (http://www.hrono.info/libris/lib_p/push_petr1_02.html)

Here's one excerpt that gives an idea about "theological" discourses of those times...

Вскоре после того (?) стрельцы под предводительством расстриги попа Никиты производят новый мятеж, вторгаются в соборную церковь во время служения, изгоняют патриарха и духовенство, которое скрывается в Грановитую палату. Старый Хованский представляет патриарху и царям требования мятежников о словопрении с Никитой. Стрельцы входят с налоем и свечами и с каменьями за пазухой, подают царям челобитную. Начинается словопрение. Патриарх и холмогорский архиепископ Афанасий (бывший некогда раскольником) вступают в феологический спор. Настает шум, летят каменья (сказка о Петре, будто бы усмирившем смятение). Бояре при помощи стрельцов-нераскольников изгоняют наконец бешеных феологов. Никита и главные мятежники схвачены и казнены 6 июня.

(A short summary in English: In May 1681, Old Believer "theologians" came to debate "theology" to the Patriarch and brought with them stones hidden in the folds of their garments. In the midst of the "theology" debate these stones were put to use, so that the armed guards (the loyal "strel'tsy") had to be called in and end the "debate." The "rabid theologians" (Pushkin's term) were eventually, after much fight, pushed out from the Patriarch's palace. On June 6,  the leader of the "theology" "debate" from the Old Believers' side, a priest called Nikita, and a few others were seized and executed.)  ::)
 

Ebor

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Riddikulus said:
I consider myself fortunate enough to be part of the "great exodus" from New Zealand; along with hubby and cat/deity, who doesn't seem to be quite over the fact that Egyptians worshipped his kind.  ;D

The really great thing is that our younger daughter, her hubby and six kids moved with us. Had they not wanted to make the move as much as we did, we would still be in the "Land of the Long Grey Cloud".
Ah.  I didn't know that there was an "exodus" from New Zealand.  I'd read some time back that there were a number of folks who wanted to move there.

"long grey cloud"?  I reckon that's  a take on Aotearoa and "white cloud" or is that a mistranslation?  I'm just curious.

I'm glad you like DWJ.  She's quite good.

I'm done with my American History Class, so I'm reading more of other books.  I'm leafing though Tales of Ise a translated Japanese work from around the earlier Heian era. 

Ebor
 

Riddikulus

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"long grey cloud"?  I reckon that's  a take on Aotearoa and "white cloud" or is that a mistranslation?  I'm just curious.
Yes, my own take on the "white cloud", because it seems to rain incessantly. The Maoris must have sighted NZ on a good day. :)

I'm glad you like DWJ.  She's quite good.
I wonder it took so long for me to discover DWJ; now that I have, I'm rather taken with her.



 
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