What is everyone reading?

copticorthodoxboy

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Currently reading

Chiang Kai-Shek: China's Generalissimo and the Nation He Lost by Jonathon Fenby

Various works for my Chinese 311 class in The Columbia Anthology of Modern Chinese Literature by Joseph S. M. Lau and Howard Goldblatt

Also, Matthew the Poor's Orthodox Prayer Life: The Interior Way

Shawn
 

Jibrail Almuhajir

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I'm fixin' to start 'The Path to Salvation' by St. Theophan the Recluse. I hear it's really good but kind of difficult.

I enjoyed 'Life After Death' by Metropolitan of Nafpaktos, Hierotheos Vlakos. It's really good but also scary. He has a whole chapter devoted to the Latins' teaching on Purgatory and the Orthodox refutation of it.

My favorite Orthodox book thus far is 'Mountain of Silence' by Kyriacos Markides. This is the book that helped me become Orthodox.

My all time favorite fictional book is 'Canary Row' by John Steinbeck. He can really tell a story. I love this little book so much that, for me, it transcends mere words.

I enjoyed 'The Brothers Karamazov' by Dostoyevsky, but it is really long.

I also enjoy anything on the Balkans; particularly Croatia, Serbia, Albania, Bulgaria, and Romania. I am at once in love with and scared to death of those folks.

Gabriel
 

Friul

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Jibrail Almuhajir said:
I also enjoy anything on the Balkans; particularly Croatia, Serbia, Albania, Bulgaria, and Romania. I am at once in love with and scared to death of those folks.
With good reason.  :p  My fiancee's mother is a Bosnian Serb and I am still scared to death of her.  :D ;)
 

Jibrail Almuhajir

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Friul said:
With good reason.   :p  My fiancee's mother is a Bosnian Serb and I am still scared to death of her.   :D ;)
Say no more.  ;) I'm getting used to the fact that everyone from the Balkans has a built-in microphone w/ two buttons; Loud and LOUDER. :'( ;) It used to be that almost everyone of our conversations started out with her saying, "Sweet-heart, you weel know whayn I am yelleeng...." :eek:

Gabriel
 

Donna Rose

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Unseen Warfare
I am reading this as well. I just got through the section on prayer -- I found it most enlightening and practical in many ways, which is something I often need when being instructed on prayer.

Also reading:

Les Miserables by Victor Hugo
Saint Innocent Apostle to America by Paul D. Garrett
Children of Hurin by J.R.R. Tolkien

And in case I haven't mentioned it here yet, I have begun the Great Reread of the Harry Potter series in time for the release of the 5th movie on July 13th and the 7th book on July 21st. :) :) :) So also:

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone by J.K. Rowling.

 

Friul

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Jibrail Almuhajir said:
Say no more.  ;) I'm getting used to the fact that everyone from the Balkans has a built-in microphone w/ two buttons; Loud and LOUDER. :'( ;) It used to be that almost everyone of our conversations started out with her saying, "Sweet-heart, you weel know whayn I am yelleeng...." :eek:
LoL!  :D

So true.  When people are naturally louder than Italians, I take notice.  :p ;)
 

Jibrail Almuhajir

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Italians have to talk loud because they're usually having to talk over their Balkan neighbors :D I forgot to mention that I'm dating a girl from Romania :eek:

Gabriel
 

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Donna Rose said:
Also reading:
Les Miserables by Victor Hugo
Saint Innocent Apostle to America by Paul D. Garrett
Children of Hurin by J.R.R. Tolkien
And in case I haven't mentioned it here yet, I have begun the Great Reread of the Harry Potter series in time for the release of the 5th movie on July 13th and the 7th book on July 21st. :) :) :) So also:

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone by J.K. Rowling.
Donna Rose - How is the Children of Hurin going?  It was out of stock at Barnes & Noble for a while and I haven't picked it up yet.  More readable than the Silmarillion?

As for Harry Potter Book 7, I did it.  I booked a fabulous B & B for 2 nights at the gorgeous Rose Hill Manor.  My fantasy escape from whining kids, obligations and never-ending laundry has been set in motion.  Just me reading on a chaise lounge watching the sunset.  Now the only thing I'm wondering, how much of a total geek/loser am I going to look like in the highly romantic dining room surrounded by smoochy couples feeding each other tidbits like courting birds.  While I try and look casual drinking wine by myself, reading a book.  At least it's not a romance novel.    http://www.rose-hill.com/
 

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TinaG said:
Donna Rose - How is the Children of Hurin going?  It was out of stock at Barnes & Noble for a while and I haven't picked it up yet.  More readable than the Silmarillion?
Ack! You remind me that I need to try to get a copy of "The Children of Hurin".  I knew I'd forgotten something with class and kids and all.  What parts of the Silmarillion did you find difficult to read?

As for Harry Potter Book 7, I did it.  I booked a fabulous B & B for 2 nights at the gorgeous Rose Hill Manor.  My fantasy escape from whining kids, obligations and never-ending laundry has been set in motion.   Just me reading on a chaise lounge watching the sunset.  Now the only thing I'm wondering, how much of a total geek/loser am I going to look like in the highly romantic dining room surrounded by smoochy couples feeding each other tidbits like courting birds.  While I try and look casual drinking wine by myself, reading a book.  At least it's not a romance novel.    http://www.rose-hill.com/
Cow-a-bunga!!  Congratulations to you on getting this plan to work.  :)  Drinking wine and reading a book sounds like a fine idea to me. 

That reminds me.. I need to make a pre-order at my little local bookstore for Volume 7...

Ebor
 

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Ebor said:
 What parts of the Silmarillion did you find difficult to read?

Ebor
Actually the whole thing.  While I've reread the LOTR many many times, I have made several unsuccesful attempts to read The Silmarillion.  I think it's a book that requires a lot of undivided attention in order to slog through the names and history with a cross reference book.  As you might have figured out, there's not a lot of distraction free time in my house.  I think that's why I read & write so much poetry and short stories.  In fact, right now I'm reading a collection of the complete short novels of Chekhov.  (For an agnostic, he has always seemed more religious than he's given credit for.)

Tina
 

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****now I'm reading a collection of the complete short novels of Chekhov.  (For an agnostic, he has always seemed more religious than he's given credit for.)

(GP) I agree with you, Tina. Chekhov is one of my all-time favorite writers. His plays are also wonderful.
 

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TinaG said:
Donna Rose - How is the Children of Hurin going?  It was out of stock at Barnes & Noble for a while and I haven't picked it up yet.  More readable than the Silmarillion?

As for Harry Potter Book 7, I did it.  I booked a fabulous B & B for 2 nights at the gorgeous Rose Hill Manor.  My fantasy escape from whining kids, obligations and never-ending laundry has been set in motion.  Just me reading on a chaise lounge watching the sunset.  Now the only thing I'm wondering, how much of a total geek/loser am I going to look like in the highly romantic dining room surrounded by smoochy couples feeding each other tidbits like courting birds.  While I try and look casual drinking wine by myself, reading a book.  At least it's not a romance novel.    http://www.rose-hill.com/
The Children of Hurin is going quite well. :) I'm working my way through it slowly, however it *is* more readable than the Silmarillion, in that it focuses on one single tale with a small handful of main characters, and so is more localized in that respect. I love the Silmarillion, but my favorite parts are the chapters or sections that really come together as tales of their own that could be excerpted from the work as a whole -- and The Children of Hurin is a novel-length version of this. There are definitely many names and history still in the book, however a manageable amount (and there is a relatively short appendix of names and descriptions as well as a fold out map of Beleriand, both of which I use frequently). Anyway, thus far I highly recommend it as a great addition to your Tolkien library. :)

As for your 2 night B & B Harry Potter 7 getaway...I think I said this when you first told us about this tradition of yours, but WOW I wish I were you and could afford to do that! As it stands, I am actually working all day on Saturday, July 21st :::sigh::: however I'll be on the Bookmobile where I'm allowed to read if I want, and you can guess what it is I'll be reading... :)

Donna
 

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Starting with what I'm reading now and going backwards:

Departures by Harry Turtledove: Good science fiction, alternative history that teaches much real history while it entertains:

    * What if Athens lost to the Persians? (Democracy? What’s that?)
    * What if Muhammad had converted as a young man and ended up a charismatic Orthodox monk composing hymns?
    * Or what if Constantinople and the rest of the eastern Roman Empire fell early on to the Muslims and Bulgaria (and thus the rest of the Slavonic world) ended up Muslim and not Christian?

And more!  ;D

Changing Places by David Lodge. Novel about two literature professors, one English from Birmingham, the other American from San Francisco, in a teacher exchange during the swinging spring of 1969.

The Liar. Stephen 'Jeeves' Fry's first novel, about a roguish public schoolboy and Cambridge student in a spy plot. Very English, camp and gay like its author.

Angela's Ashes. Frank McCourt's Pulitzer-winning first book, an autobiography about growing up in the slums of Limerick, Ireland in the 1930s and 1940s.

The Sum of All Fears, a Tom Clancy number from 1991. Entertaining yarn: Black Sunday with nukes. An advantage of not seeing the movies: my Jack Ryan doesn't look like Harrison Ford or Ben Affleck.

An advantage of taking commuter trains to work instead of driving is I make time to read books again.
 

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Welkodox - do you mean a short story about the village hunter (Yegor) who meets his wife (Pelageya) with whom he does not live, and she begs him to return? In the Russian original, it's called "Yeger'"... Yes, it's a gem, one of the shortest short novels by Chekhov, tremendously deep in fact, very humble, very humane...
 

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Heorhij said:
Welkodox - do you mean a short story about the village hunter (Yegor) who meets his wife (Pelageya) with whom he does not live, and she begs him to return? In the Russian original, it's called "Yeger'"... Yes, it's a gem, one of the shortest short novels by Chekhov, tremendously deep in fact, very humble, very humane...
Yes.
 

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My favorite short novels by Chekhov are "The House with a Mezzanine" (what an indictment of cruelty of human beings involved in "charity" "projects," among other things), "Lady with a Dog," "Ionych," "Van'ka" (or "Van'ka Zhukov" - this one is perhaps not conveyed well in translations, it needs to be read in Russian), "Gooseberries," and a number of others (I'll recall their titles and plots if I just glance at their first paragraph). But I really do admire his plays, "Sea Gull," "Uncle Vanya," and "Cherry Orchard."
 
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Mary Queen of Scots by Antonia Fraser and Centuries writings of St Maximos the confessor (Philokalia vol. II).
 

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Donna Rose said:
As for your 2 night B & B Harry Potter 7 getaway...I think I said this when you first told us about this tradition of yours, but WOW I wish I were you and could afford to do that! As it stands, I am actually working all day on Saturday, July 21st :::sigh::: however I'll be on the Bookmobile where I'm allowed to read if I want, and you can guess what it is I'll be reading... :)

Donna
Working on a Bookmobile sounds like a dream job.  I have very fond memories of Bookmobiles.  If you want to read a totally amazing short story, try searching for The Night Bookmobile by Audrey Niffenegger.  It was published through Zoetrope's All Story, or read on Symphony Space's Selected Shorts program on NPR.
 
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