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What is everyone reading?

DeathToTheWorld

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I found this helpful rule on this website: http://www.hesychasm.ru/en/library.htm

St Theophan the Recluse - The Path to Salvation

Here is a rule for reading:



Before reading you should empty your soul of everything.

Arouse the desire to know about what is being read.

Turn prayerfully to God.

Follow what you are reading with attention and place everything in your open heart.

If something did not reach the heart, stay with it until it reaches.

You should of course read quite slowly.

Stop reading when the soul no longer wants to nourish itself with reading. That means it is full. If the soul finds one passage utterly stunning, stop there and read no more.

The best time for reading the Word of God is in the morning, Lives of saints after the mid-day meal, and Holy Fathers before going to sleep. Thus you can take up a little bit each day.

During such occupations, you should continually keep in mind the main goal — impressing the truth on yourself and awakening the spirit. If reading or discourse does not bring this about, then they are but idle itchings of the tongue and ears, or empty discussion. If it is done with intelligence, then the truths impress themselves and rouse the spirit, and one thing aids the other. But if the reading or discourse digresses from the proper image, then there is neither one nor the other — truth is stuffed into the head like sand, and the spirit becomes cold and hard, smokes over and puffs up.

Impressing the spirit is not the same as searching for it. This requires only that you clarify what the truth is, and hold it in your mind until they bond together. Let there be no deductions or limitations — only the face of truth.

The easiest method for this could lawfully be considered the following: the whole truth is in the catechesis. Every morning take the truth from it and clarify it to yourself, carry it in your mind and nourish yourself with it for as long as it feeds the soul — a day, two days or longer. Do the same thing with another truth, and continue thus to the end. This is a method that is easy and applicable to everyone. Those who do not know how to read may ask for one truth and proceed from there.

We can see that the rule for everyone is this: impress the truth in a way that will awaken you. The methods for fulfilling this rule vary, and it is not at all possible to prescribe the same one for everyone.

Thus, reading, listening and discourse that do not impress the truth or awaken the spirit should be considered wrong, as they lead away from the truth. It is a sickness to read many books out of curiosity alone, when only the mind follows what is being read, without leading it to the heart or delighting in its flavor.

This is the science of dreaming; it is not creative, does not hasten success, but is devastating and always leads to arrogance. All your work should be limited, as we have said, to the following: clarify the truth and hold it in the mind until the heart tastes of it. The Holy Fathers put it simply: remember it, hold it in the mind, and have it always before your eyes.
 

DeathToTheWorld

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Gebre Menfes Kidus said:
People of The Lie:The Hope for Healing Human Evil
by M. Scott Peck, M.D.


Very good so far. Here are some notable passages and quotes:

"It is a strange thing: Dozens of times I have been asked by patients or acquaintances: 'Dr. Peck, why is there evil in the world?' Yet no one ever asked me in all these years: 'Why is there good in the world?' It is as if we automatically assume that this is a naturally good world that has somehow been contaminated by evil. In terms of what we know of science, however, it is actually easier to explain evil. That things decay is quite explainable in accord with the natural laws of physics. That life should evolve into more and more complex forms is not so easily understandable. That children generally lie and cheat and steal is routinely observable. The fact that they sometimes grow up to become truly honest adults is what seems the more remarkable. Laziness is more the rule than diligence. If we seriously think about it, it probably makes more sense to assume this is a naturally evil world that has somehow been mysteriously 'contaminated' by goodness, rather than the other way around. The mystery of goodness is even greater than the mystery of evil."


"While science needs those innovators who will champion a single new model as the most advanced understanding, the patient who seeks to be understood as wholly as possible would be well advised to seek a therapist capable of approaching the mystery of the human soul from all angles. Science has not yet, however, become exaclty broad-minded."


"In the face of such holy mystery it is best we remember to walk with the kind of care that is born both of fear and love."


"The battle to heal human evil always begins at home. And self-purification will always be our greatest weapon."




Selam

They are very creative paragraphs, but I don't agree with some of those statements.

It sounds like a scientist or a philosopher trying to explain what evil is.

But the world is not evil, an evil will is evil. The world is corrupted, but Christ has renewed everything by His Blood.

Humans are created good, men are not evil by nature. Everything is very good. Every creature of God is good and nothing is to be refused if it is eaten with Faith in Jesus Christ, as the Apostle says.

It is the environment created by the evil will of evil minded men that make the world evil.

Sure death makes it evil, but Christ has defeated death.

Sin does not even exist, it is given existence when we bring the evil passions into action. Evil is like a shadow. It is like the absence of light. That is how the Fathers explained it.

Was it not Adam and Eve, our first parents the one's who tried to convince God that they were not at fault when they disobeyed a direct commandment of God?

Eve said to God to try to justify her sinfulness, ''The Serpent deceived me''

And Adam likewise, ''The woman whom YOU gave to be with me, gave me of the tree and I ate''


They wanted to blame God and other things for their own sin and disobedience.

What a miserable mistake!

Poor wretches!



That's what I learned from the Fathers, mainly St Dorotheos of Gaza - Practical Teachings on the Christian Life

 

mersch

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I picked up a book at a used book store yesterday on my lunch break. "The Inner Journey, Views from the Christian Tradition"  It's appears to be a collection or articles, or writings. Only recognize a few of the contributors, Fr. Thomas Keating, Bede Griffith (I know of his writings, contraversol  :)  ) Fr. Alexander Schmemann, Metropolitan( Bishop, at time of the article) Kallistos Ware, Fr. Thomas Hopke, Thomas Merton.  There are many others I do not know. Anyone else read this book? There isn't much used books on Orthodoxy at the used stores I visit, this was only $4.00. Haven't started it yet.
 

Asteriktos

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The Struggle Against Ecumenism: The History of the True Orthodox Church of Greece From 1924 to 1994
 

stanley123

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Asteriktos said:
The Struggle Against Ecumenism: The History of the True Orthodox Church of Greece From 1924 to 1994
It is interesting that there is a True Orthodox Church of Greece. Who is the head of the True Orthodox Church and how does the True Orthodox Church relate to the other Orthodox Churches?
 

Asteriktos

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stanley123 said:
Asteriktos said:
The Struggle Against Ecumenism: The History of the True Orthodox Church of Greece From 1924 to 1994
It is interesting that there is a True Orthodox Church of Greece. Who is the head of the True Orthodox Church and how does the True Orthodox Church relate to the other Orthodox Churches?
There are quite a few True/Genuine traditionalist Orthodox groups in Greece. This forum is owned by an Orthodox Christian priest who is in the group headed by Archbp. Chrysostomos II (though they have two American bishops as well). Many of the True/Genuine groups consider the new calendarists or world Orthodoxy to be without grace, and have no communion with them; and they usually don't have communion with other traditionalists either, for various reasons. Some have a softer stance, and say that there might be grace among world Orthodoxy, while Met. Cyprian's group believes that there is grace in world Orthodoxy. There are also True/Genuine Orthodox groups in Russia, America, etc.
 

xuxana

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my SF lent me Eternal Mysyeries Beyond The Grave by Archimandrite Pateleimon. it's a jordanville book & its amazing.  i'm reading that & Battlefield of the Mind by Joyce Meyer.
 

Friul

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The Portable Atheist: Essential Readings for the Nonbeliever

Not very far into it, currently on the David Hume chapter.  The fact that it is selected writings from over 40 different people makes each chapter completely different and quite interesting to go through.
 

Asteriktos

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Nebelpfade said:
The Portable Atheist: Essential Readings for the Nonbeliever

Not very far into it, currently on the David Hume chapter.  The fact that it is selected writings from over 40 different people makes each chapter completely different and quite interesting to go through.
So I take it you'd recommend it (so far)?  :angel: I've read a couple books like that, with one that I enjoyed (Atheism: A Reader) and one that I didn't like (Critiques of God: Making the Case Against Belief in God).

EDIT--Just thought I'd mention, my favorite atheist book was Western Atheism: A Short History. I wish I could find an entire book on atheism/agnosticism in ancient times.
 

Friul

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Asteriktos said:
So I take it you'd recommend it (so far)?  :angel: I've read a couple books like that, with one that I enjoyed (Atheism: A Reader) and one that I didn't like (Critiques of God: Making the Case Against Belief in God).
I'd definitely recommend it so far.  I have already read a bunch of the pieces that are included in some of the chapters latter on (mainly Shelley, Twain, Freud, Einstein, Russell, Sagan, Dennett, Dawkins, Rushdie, etc.) and am happy to see certain names and pieces pop up.  I'd say it is a good deal better than Atheism: A Reader (especially Joshi's intro vs. Hitchens), and leagues ahead of Critiques of God.
 

Shanghaiski

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Sidetracked from David Copperfield and Don Quixote by Henryk Sienkiewicz's "With Fire and Sword," translated by W.S. Kuniczak. The Kuniczak translation of the Sienkiewicz trilogy appears to be sadly out of print. This is a travesty.
 

Friul

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Asteriktos said:
EDIT--Just thought I'd mention, my favorite atheist book was Western Atheism: A Short History. I wish I could find an entire book on atheism/agnosticism in ancient times.
You might want to check out Drachmann's Atheism in Pagan Antiquity.  You can download a copy here:  http://manybooks.net/titles/drachmanna2831228312-8.html

The PDF wasn't designed very well, so the actually body of the book doesn't start until the 10th or 11th page.
 

Asteriktos

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Nebelpfade said:
Asteriktos said:
EDIT--Just thought I'd mention, my favorite atheist book was Western Atheism: A Short History. I wish I could find an entire book on atheism/agnosticism in ancient times.
You might want to check out Drachmann's Atheism in Pagan Antiquity.  You can download a copy here:  http://manybooks.net/titles/drachmanna2831228312-8.html

The PDF wasn't designed very well, so the actually body of the book doesn't start until the 10th or 11th page.
Hey, thanks! I'll give it a look online, and maybe just buy it in book form if I see that I want to read it all (I found it on Amazon.com).  :)
 
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LilLamb said:
I am reading St Seraphim of Sarov A Spiritual Biography by Archimandrite Lazarus Moore, and also am reading Don Quixote.

Big Smile!  I read Don Quixote in the 10th grade and purchased an album of a stage performance and drove my family crazy...

I've read the Biography by Archimandrite Lazarus Moore before and have been reading it in parts again happenstancedly during this Pascha.

John
 

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I am reading "The Herald Sun" by some Masonic-Judaic printing press ... its great light reading and some times a bit dramatic.
 

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Bonobo Handshake by Vanessa Woods. How she ended up working with the Bonobo chimps, and the situation in the Congo. Reminds me that what I complain about here in America is not that bad compared with the war that went on(is still on) in that country and what people still go through,( regardless of their religious affiliation, or lack of) in this day and age. 
 

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Right and Reasn: Ethics in Theory an Practice Based on teh Teachings of Aristotle and St. Thomas Aquinas - Fr. Austin Fagothey, S.J.
 

scamandrius

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John McGuckin's St. Cyril of Alexandria and the Christological Controversy.
Fr. John Meyendorff's Living Tradition
Fr. John Meyendorff's Byzantine Theology
Fr. John Meyendorff's Christ in Eastern Christian Thought
 

Rastaman

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"World Made by Hand" by James Howard Kunstler, for the second time. Highly recommend it!
 

stanley123

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Papist said:
Right and Reasn: Ethics in Theory an Practice Based on teh Teachings of Aristotle and St. Thomas Aquinas - Fr. Austin Fagothey, S.J.
That is a great book, depending on which edition you have. The early editions were excellent, but then I know that one  of the post Vatican II editions reflecting subjective, relativistic, and existentialist ethics was not so good. Then after that, I think there was an improvement. Which edition (or year) are you recommending?
 

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I'm finally reading this:

Free Choice in Saint Maximus the Confessor



It's out of print and so I had to go to kinkos! But yeah, it's an awesome book! I'm gonna have to read it 3 or 4 times in order to really understand it all.








ICXC NIKA
 

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Broke, USA by Gary Rivlin
http://www.amazon.com/Broke-USA-Pawnshops-Poverty-Business/dp/0061733210/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1277279198&sr=8-1
 

Andrew21091

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Reading The Gurus, the Young Man, and Elder Paisios now. It is really good. I've gotten though about a third of it.
 

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jnorm888 said:
I'm finally reading this:

Free Choice in Saint Maximus the Confessor



It's out of print and so I had to go to kinkos! But yeah, it's an awesome book! I'm gonna have to read it 3 or 4 times in order to really understand it all.








ICXC NIKA
Looks like a good one. I saw it on Amazon.com recently.
 

Ebor

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Two books on Lyme Disease for a paper for class.  I can now rattle off Borrelia Burgdorferi at the drop of a hat.  But class is done now so I can read other things    :D
 

Asteriktos

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Carvaka/Lokayata:An Anthology of Source Materials and Some Recent Studies - ed. by Debiprasad Chattopadhyaya. Much less enjoyable than I thought it'd be. I mean, it's about a heterodox current of thought in ancient India that was atheistic/naturalistic and hedonistic. They were to Hinduism and Buddhism what the most outrageous heretics were to Christianity. How do you make that kind of thing dry and boring? Then again, probably the boringest* book I've ever read was on the epistemology of the Cyrenaics, a hedonistic school in ancient Greece. Hedonists just apparently aren't that interesting  :D


*Wait, is boringest a word? Oh well...
 

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Gebre Menfes Kidus said:
An Unbroken Circle: Linking Ancient African Christianity to the African American Experience

http://www.archangelsbooks.com/proddetail.asp?prod=CSBALTSCHP-01




Excellent book!


Selam

Yes, I have the book! As well as this one:


They both are great books!



Hey, check these vids out:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iGwII0CLh7M (unbroken circle part 2)

http://vimeo.com/12155467 (unbroken circle)






ICXC NIKA
 
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