What is everyone reading?

Ebor

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EofK said:
^Oh, definitely!  I made the mistake of reading the book I mentioned when our daughter was still waking up to eat every two hours at night and the story was so good I couldn't help read it... even at 3 am in a quiet, dark house.  I can't count the times I had to cross myself walking down our the hallway back to bed!
Lovecraft had a amazing way of setting up eldritch situations and nameless horrors, didn't he? 

Did you know that he was also very fond of cats?  Here is a link to an essay he wrote:
http://terror.snm-hgkz.ch/lovecraft/html/catsdogs.htm

I love the line

"I have no active dislike for dogs, any more than I have for monkeys, human beings, tradesmen, cows, sheep, or pterodactyls; but for the cat I have entertained a particular respect and affection ever since the earliest days of my infancy."

Ebor
 

EofK

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^Yay on cat fans!  The one thing I don't much like in Lovecraft's works is that he needed a thesaurus.  He kept using "nameless" way too much and after a few chapters, that feels like getting too lazy to describe things properly.  Otherwise, he's a very imaginative writer.  And much like Stephen King, I would hate to see the inside of his mind. 
 

Ebor

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EofK said:
^Yay on cat fans!  The one thing I don't much like in Lovecraft's works is that he needed a thesaurus.  He kept using "nameless" way too much and after a few chapters, that feels like getting too lazy to describe things properly.  Otherwise, he's a very imaginative writer.  And much like Stephen King, I would hate to see the inside of his mind. 
When someone is coming up with things like Nyarlathotep and Cthulhu and Yog-Sothoth (sp?) there may have been times when he couldn't bear another named horror. :D  Then again, long ago a friend described a bit of Lovecraft as "I beheld an indescribable horror... which I will now describe for 3 pages." 

Ebor
 

Papist

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GabrieltheCelt said:
Any Steinbeck fans out there?  He's probably my favorite American author.
Really now? I remember reading East of Eden in High School and thinking, "will this book ever end?" LOL. I am sure I would have a greater appreciation for it now if I read it.  :)
 

Jibrail Almuhajir

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Riddikulus said:
I like Steinbeck very much, although reading his dialect ridden dialogues are a bit of a chore.
Probably one of the reasons I love his works;  It reminds me of my grandparents and older kinfolk.  People still talk like that here in the Ozarks if you know where to look.  It's the lyrical, twangy, honest, salt-of-the-earth speech of rural folks and I love it.
 

Jibrail Almuhajir

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Αριστοκλής said:
Yes. Yes, here. But Hemingway is probably mine.
Riddikulus said:
I love Hemingway's terse narrative. I loved "Fairwell to Arms"...... not quite sure why.  ???
I liked Hemingway, but his terseness and narrative style always seems anxious, uptight, and impatient.  Kinda reminds me of a big city person visiting a small town; rush, rush, rush 'cause my way's faster and better.
 

Riddikulus

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GabrieltheCelt said:
Probably one of the reasons I love his works;  It reminds me of my grandparents and older kinfolk.  People still talk like that here in the Ozarks if you know where to look.  It's the lyrical, twangy, honest, salt-of-the-earth speech of rural folks and I love it.
I have to admit, it's sort of foreign to me.  :D
 

Riddikulus

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GabrieltheCelt said:
I liked Hemingway, but his terseness and narrative style always seems anxious, uptight, and impatient.  Kinda reminds me of a big city person visiting a small town; rush, rush, rush 'cause my way's faster and better.
Yes, that is so true. Something funny; I once bought "For Whom the Bell Tolls" in a second-hand bookstore and when I got home I was infuriated that that particular version had replaced every expletive with "unrepeatable word" or something similar. Grrrrrrrrrrr  :mad: That totally ruined the story for me and I didn't finish it. I hired the film, instead!  :laugh:
 

Aristocles

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GabrieltheCelt said:
I liked Hemingway, but his terseness and narrative style always seems anxious, uptight, and impatient.  Kinda reminds me of a big city person visiting a small town; rush, rush, rush 'cause my way's faster and better.
Funny...that's the way I feel about Faulkner, not Hemingway.
 

Riddikulus

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GabrieltheCelt said:
Ha ha. :D You're thinking of some backwoods, Georgia Appalachian boys.  (And no offense to any backwoods, Georgia Appalachian boys.) ;D
Oh dear, it's all the same to my untrained ear!  :laugh:
 
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