What is everyone reading?

EofK

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GabrieltheCelt said:
Faulkner?  Impatient?  He's slower than a glass of molasses on in January.
Agreed.  I attempted to read Absalom, Absalom in college and made it through the first paragraph.  Which extended into page three.   :eek:
 

Jibrail Almuhajir

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My favorite Steinbeck work is Cannery Row.  His characters are described so richly and descriptively that it's easy to 'see' them.  He understands the human condition very well and I think most people can identify with at least parts of his characters or at least his narrative.   
 

Riddikulus

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Αριστοκλής said:
Hey, I like Dickens. But I thought our tangent was on American authors.
OOOPS  :-[ (Of course, I could have inadvertantly ended the American author tangent and started a English author one?)

BTW, I love Dickens.  ;D
 

Asteriktos

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I just finished Why Christianity Must Change or Die by Bp. Spong. I found the book to be largely unconvincing, though that might have come partially from an unfamiliarity with the concept of God that he was trying to argue for. I think if I had read more of authors such as Paul Tillich, I would have better understood exactly where Bp. Spong was going in this book. Even then, though, there seemed to be a streak of pessimism in the book that I found off-putting. For example, Bp. Spong says that Christians use terms like "divine" and "almighty" as an attempt to flatter God and get something out of it (p. 139). Surely most Christians use such terms because they believe it proper to reverence God. I also just started another book by Bp. Spong, Resuing the Bible from Fundamentalism, though it's too early to form any opinions about this one. As to why 2 books by this particular author: I had for years heard bad things about him, and had perhaps even myself said a bad thing or two about him, so I figured I owed him a fair hearing.

I also recently started The Existence of God by John Hick. This is a book I first read 8 years ago, when I was in a similar spiritual place. I recalled it helping me then, so I figured I'd give it another shot. Basically the book gives the arguments for the existence of God, and then allows different authors to offer commentary and opposing views. Hick believes that you cannot argue someone into believing in God through these proofs (which I would agree with, eventually there must be a place for faith), but still considers it an important topic.
 

stanley123

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Asteriktos said:
I also recently started The Existence of God by John Hick.
There is a recent book on this subject which is not too bad:There Is a God: How the World's Most Notorious Atheist Changed His Mind by Antony Flew and Roy Abraham Varghese

 

Asteriktos

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Stanley

There is a recent book on this subject which is not too bad:There Is a God: How the World's Most Notorious Atheist Changed His Mind by Antony Flew and Roy Abraham Varghese
Yeah, I have that one on the Christmas list, though it'll probably get bought sometime this summer. I look forward to hearing what the man has to say.
 

Ebor

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I'm reading The Thought War a study of Japanese Propaganda in the "Fifteen Years War/WWII" era, Empire of Ivory the fourth "Temeraire" book by Naomi Novik, Japanese Tales translated by Royall Tyler, Hogfather by Terry Pratchett.

I'm also gearing up to read the first three chapters of my text book for the Summer Session of "ENG 102" which used to be, when I was young, "Freshman Comp" but now they don't call it that.  Since I was first in college the rules have changed and everyone must take it. No testing out, no CLEPing out. I'd never had it so I'm stuck. So I decided to take it in the somewhat compressed form of a 2 month or so Summer class rather then in a regular term.  Ah well, it's more credits and another step to a degree.

Ebor
 

Jibrail Almuhajir

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I'm thinking of reading The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini.  Currently, I'm reading A Hole in the Heart of the World by Jonathan Kaufman.  It's about 'the Jewish experience in Eastern Europe after WWII'.  Also, a great reference book from my library is The Blackwell Dictionary of Eastern Christianity.  Amazing book.
 

Orthodox Bagpiper

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Social Problems: Identifying and understanding problems in society 5th edition.

Yeah, its another boring school book for another sociology class.  :p
 

Aristocles

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Just finished Manuel II Palaeologus 1391-1425: A Study in Late Byzantine Statesmanship  John W. Barker. Rutgers Byzantine Series; Rutgers University Press, 1969

Next up (I'd started before this):
Arab Historians of the Crusades - Francesco Gabrieli
 

ytterbiumanalyst

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I'm re-reading Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. I was interrupted last year by the beginning of school, and between the classes I teach and the ones I'm taking, during the school year I never get a good enough window for fiction or even any books unrelated to school. So I welcome summer fiction season and all the joy it will bring.
 

Heorhij

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"Roksolana" by a Ukrainian writer, Pavlo Zahrebel'nyj. (In Ukrainian.) It's a very well-written historical novel about a young woman from Podillya (southwestern Ukraine - then part of the Polish Kingdom), who was captured and sold into slavery by Crimean Tatars, but in 1524 became the beloved wife of the Ottoman sultan Suleyman the Magnificent. Her real name was Anastasia Lisovs'ka. The Turks called her Hurrem ("the merry one") or Hasseki. She was not a picture-perfect beauty - rather, a tomboy: very short, thin, with red hair, green eyes and a funny shaped "pig nose." However, she was enormously intelligent, strong-willed, humorous, and a great diplomat. Between 1524 and 1528 she actually prevented several wars between the Ottoman Empire and the Polish kingdom, acting through her trusted Yenicheri commander Hassan Agasi-Efendi and a Polish ambassador Jan of Trenchyn. Very intriguing story line, and a lot of most intense and educational material about the 16-th century Europe.
 

Asteriktos

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Just started two new books recently: Adam, Eve, and the Serpent by Elaine Pagels, and The Debate About the Bible: Inerrancy Versus Infallibility by Stephen T. Davis. I read the second book years ago, when I was still a Protestant. Basically Mr. Davis argues that the Bible is infallible but not inerrant (ie. that there are errors and contradictions here and there in the Bible, but that these errors don't compromise the truthfulness of the Bible when it comes to matters of faith and practice).
 

Schultz

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I'm a little more than halfway through Jesus of Nazareth by Pope Benedict and am about to start Frankenstein: a cultural history by Susan Tyler Hitchcock.  My wife found it very dry but I like that sort of writing.

I must say that I find Pope Benedict's writing style, even in translation, to be very engaging.  I'm learning alot from this book and look forward to reading more of his works in the future.
 
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