What is everyone reading?

vamrat

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A History of England.  I don't recall the author off the top of my head, but it is a pretty good read.  Just finished with Alfred the Great.
 

Asteriktos

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Many Orthodox seem to like Schmemann, though there have been a few critiques of his work (mostly coming from more traditional Orthodox, such as Fr. Michael Pomazansky).
 

trevor72694

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Now, I'm reading Father Arseney

very fascinating, and inspiring insight into the life of a Russian priest in a labor camp in the Soviet Union.

I am, though, excited to sink my teeth into this:
 

AntoniousNikolas

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Roots by Alex Haley.

Just finished Mark Twain's essay To the Person Sitting in Darkness, a brilliant rebuttal to Kipling's patronizing The White Man's Burden.
 

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St. Cyril of Alexandria: The Christological Controversy : Its History, Theology, and Texts
Author: John Anthony McGuckin
Publisher: St Vladimirs Seminary Press (April 1, 2004)



Can't recommend this enough...almost understandable to even a moron like me :D
 

theistgal

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Rereading a favorite children's book, found while cleaning out the garage: "Never Go Anywhere With Digby," by Ethelyn M. Parkinson, 1971.  Basically 4 boys go on a road trip by bicycle.  Very funny - holds up quite well!
 

mersch

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theistgal said:
Rereading a favorite children's book, found while cleaning out the garage: "Never Go Anywhere With Digby," by Ethelyn M. Parkinson, 1971.  Basically 4 boys go on a road trip by bicycle.  Very funny - holds up quite well!
I remember that book, great book!
 

theistgal

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mersch said:
theistgal said:
Rereading a favorite children's book, found while cleaning out the garage: "Never Go Anywhere With Digby," by Ethelyn M. Parkinson, 1971.  Basically 4 boys go on a road trip by bicycle.  Very funny - holds up quite well!
I remember that book, great book!
I also have a copy of the same author's "Today I Am A Ham", about a boy who's trying to become a ham radio operator.  The technology is pretty dated but that's also still a fun book!  :)
 

Papist

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God: His Existent and His Nature: A Thomistic Solution of Certain Agnotstic Antimonies
                                                                              - Reginald Garrigou-Lagrange

Its AWESOME!!!
 

Gebre Menfes Kidus

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CoptoGeek said:
St. Cyril of Alexandria: The Christological Controversy : Its History, Theology, and Texts
Author: John Anthony McGuckin
Publisher: St Vladimirs Seminary Press (April 1, 2004)



Can't recommend this enough...almost understandable to even a moron like me :D
Tell me more if you don't mind. Is it written by a non-Chalcedonian?


Selam
 

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Gebre Menfes Kidus said:
Tell me more if you don't mind. Is it written by a non-Chalcedonian?

Selam
Fr. John is Romanian Orthodox Priest who was born and raised Roman Catholic. So, no he's not a "non-Chalcedonian".  But he is a first rate scholar and a great admirer of St. Cyril and his writings. Although I don't necessarily agree with everything he said regarding Chalcedon (which he only touched on in one chapter), I greatly appreciated his eirenic writing style and learned a lot.... A LOT! I also think its a perfect companion to Fr. Samuels book and a foundational book for anyone interested in the Christological controversies of the time.

I'd be lying if I said it was an easy read and do plan on re-reading it several more times but its only because the material itself is so above my meager intellect.  Fr. John's writing style is that of a teacher and he breaks things down very well. But it does need real study as opposed to the normal way I read books i.e. holding the book in one hand and my daughter in the other while trying to keep her from tearing the pages  ;D

I hope all is well with you and your family, brother.

In Christ.
 

Gebre Menfes Kidus

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CoptoGeek said:
Gebre Menfes Kidus said:
Tell me more if you don't mind. Is it written by a non-Chalcedonian?

Selam
Fr. John is Romanian Orthodox Priest who was born and raised Roman Catholic. So, no he's not a "non-Chalcedonian".  But he is a first rate scholar and a great admirer of St. Cyril and his writings. Although I don't necessarily agree with everything he said regarding Chalcedon (which he only touched on in one chapter), I greatly appreciated his eirenic writing style and learned a lot.... A LOT! I also think its a perfect companion to Fr. Samuels book and a foundational book for anyone interested in the Christological controversies of the time.

I'd be lying if I said it was an easy read and do plan on re-reading it several more times but its only because the material itself is so above my meager intellect.  Fr. John's writing style is that of a teacher and he breaks things down very well. But it does need real study as opposed to the normal way I read books i.e. holding the book in one hand and my daughter in the other while trying to keep her from tearing the pages  ;D

I hope all is well with you and your family, brother.

In Christ.

Thanks! Sounds like I'll need to read it eventually.

Selam
 

ytterbiumanalyst

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The Disappearing Spoon and Other True Tales of Madness, Love, and the History of the World from the Periodic Table of the Elements by Sam Kean. It's a fascinating look at humanity from the point of view of the various elements, from the time the first protons hurtled out of the Big Bang through the naming of Copernicium. Brilliant storytelling and historical and scientific accuracy rarely can be found in the same work, which makes Kean's achievement all the more impressive. Highly recommended for lovers of history and science, and anyone who ever "accidentally" dropped a mercury thermometer just to watch what happened.
 

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I'm REreading a wonderful novel by the late Rumer Godden (you may be familiar with her "In This House of Brede", about an older woman who enters a convent) - this one is called "China Court", and it's a lovely, slow-moving but not at all dull, story chronicling the days followng the death of an elderly woman.  Her granddaughter, who hasn't seen her since she herself was a child, comes to the funeral and is dismayed by how her aunts and uncles are all too eager to sell off all the bits and pieces that made the house (called China Court) so special to her.

Yet none of the characters is a caricature - we see why each of them came to be what they are today, and we understand that they're just ordinary sinners like you and me.

I'm still not getting at the heart of the story but that's because it's just one of those books that's really hard to describe!  Just read it - you'll see what I mean! :)
 

Gebre Menfes Kidus

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FormerReformer said:
The Brothers Karamazov.  I can't believe I made it to thirty without reading an entire novel by Dostoyevsky.

What a great book! I read it long before I was Orthodox, and I loved it. I really need to read it again now, because I'm sure there was a lot I missed the first time I read it through the lens of Protestantism.


Selam
 

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Contemporary Ascetics of Mount Athos, Volume I

Hands down, one of the top 5 most interesting and beneficial books I have ever read. 
 

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Gebre Menfes Kidus said:
FormerReformer said:
The Brothers Karamazov.  I can't believe I made it to thirty without reading an entire novel by Dostoyevsky.

What a great book! I read it long before I was Orthodox, and I loved it. I really need to read it again now, because I'm sure there was a lot I missed the first time I read it through the lens of Protestantism.


Selam
Having now finished the book, I can say I greatly enjoyed it, and am disappointed that Dostoyevsky died before informing us of the later actions of Alyosha.
 

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Working through the following right now:

The Lord Christ: Out of Egypt
by Anne Rice
Commentary on Galatians by Fr. Paul Nadim Tarazi
The Virgin Mary:  Celebration of Faith 3 by +Fr. Alexander Schmemann
The Way of the Fathers:  Exploring the Patristic Mind by Fr. John Chryssavgis
 

vamrat

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Started "Ghosts of Cannae".  It's pretty good, for any ancient history lovers out there.
 

scamandrius

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Can't remember if I mentioned it here, but I finally finished Fr. A. James Bernstein's book, Surprised by Christ.  Not a bad read, but once you've read one conversion story, you've kind of read them all!
 

EVOO

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I thought "Surprised by Christ" was a unique conversion story.  I, personally, don't know of many Jews who have become Christians, not to mention, Orthodox.

I just finished "The Exiles of the Cebenna", and I'm starting "How the Irish Saved Civilization".
 

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Nebelpfade said:
"On the cruelty of really teaching computing science" by Edsger Wybe Dijkstra
this sounds like a really great book, but I didn't find it listed on Amazon. Do you have the ISBN?
 

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stanley123 said:
Nebelpfade said:
"On the cruelty of really teaching computing science" by Edsger Wybe Dijkstra
this sounds like a really great book, but I didn't find it listed on Amazon. Do you have the ISBN?
It is actually just a short paper he wrote in the late 80s.  Not sure if it has been published, but it can be found in the Dijkstra Archive:  http://www.cs.utexas.edu/users/EWD/ewd10xx/EWD1036.PDF
 

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Lucid Dreaming: A Concise Guide to Awakening in Your Dreams and in Your Life by Stephen LaBerge
 

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Nebelpfade said:
stanley123 said:
Nebelpfade said:
"On the cruelty of really teaching computing science" by Edsger Wybe Dijkstra
this sounds like a really great book, but I didn't find it listed on Amazon. Do you have the ISBN?
It is actually just a short paper he wrote in the late 80s.  Not sure if it has been published, but it can be found in the Dijkstra Archive:  http://www.cs.utexas.edu/users/EWD/ewd10xx/EWD1036.PDF
What text do you use nowadays for intro students? I was privileged to work through an older edition of:

 

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deusveritasest said:
Lucid Dreaming: A Concise Guide to Awakening in Your Dreams and in Your Life by Stephen LaBerge
One of the benefits of sleep I find is the loss of consciousness. I always find myself incredibly disappointed upon waking if I remember having dreamt.
 

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FormerReformer said:
The Brothers Karamazov.  I can't believe I made it to thirty without reading an entire novel by Dostoyevsky.
Same here, exactly!  I'm about 200 pages from the end and loving it as I've not loved any other work of fiction.

Also reading Alaskan Missionary Spirituality (for a class this Fall), Meyendorff's book on Palamas and Palamas' sermons (ditto), and Peaceful Journey: A Hospice Chaplain's Guide to End of Life.
 

AntoniousNikolas

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From Publishers Weekly
In the first half of the 19th century, some three million Irish emigrated to America, trading a ruling elite of Anglo-Irish Anglicans for one of WASPs. The Irish immigrants were (self-evidently) not Anglo-Saxon; most were not Protestant; and, as far as many of the nativists were concerned, they weren't white, either. Just how, in the years surrounding the Civil War, the Irish evolved from an oppressed, unwelcome social class to become part of a white racial class is the focus of Harvard lecturer Ignatiev's well-researched, intriguing although haphazardly structured book.


Very interesting little book.  Provides some insight into why this fella was so ticked off all the time...

 

stanley123

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Nebelpfade said:
stanley123 said:
Nebelpfade said:
"On the cruelty of really teaching computing science" by Edsger Wybe Dijkstra
this sounds like a really great book, but I didn't find it listed on Amazon. Do you have the ISBN?
It is actually just a short paper he wrote in the late 80s.  Not sure if it has been published, but it can be found in the Dijkstra Archive:  http://www.cs.utexas.edu/users/EWD/ewd10xx/EWD1036.PDF
Thanks for this link.
 

Friul

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orthonorm said:
What text do you use nowadays for intro students? I was privileged to work through an older edition of:

Intro courses are really fragmented these days I find, but you will still find the 2nd edition of the Wizard book used now and then.

How to Design Programs: An Introduction to Programming and Computing by Matthias Felleisen, Robert Bruce Findler, Matthew Flatt, & Shriram Krishnamurthi
Mathematical Logic by George J. Tourlakis
Introduction to the Theory of Computation by Michael Sipser

Those were a few of the first year books I had.  I was lucky enough to have rather theoretical professors, rather than the more applied "software engineering" (shudders) professors.
 
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