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What is everyone reading?

deusveritasest

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Asteriktos said:
The Septuagint as Christian Scripture: It's Prehistory and the Problem of Its Canon, by Martin Hengel
Would you mind giving a really minimal summary of it, like what you find on the back of books?
 

Asteriktos

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deusveritasest said:
Asteriktos said:
The Septuagint as Christian Scripture: It's Prehistory and the Problem of Its Canon, by Martin Hengel
Would you mind giving a really minimal summary of it, like what you find on the back of books?
Unfortunately the back of the Hengel book just has quotes from other people about how great the book is supposed to be… e.g. “It is written with erudition but also with sufficient clarity… etc.” However, Amazon.com gives this description:

“In this work, world-renowned scholar Martin Hengel laments that so few people (including scholars) appreciate the Septuagint (the Greek translation of the Old Testament), considering it a '’mere translation.‘' By contrast, Hengel recognizes the Septuagint's historical and theological value, noting that it is the first complete and pre-Christian commentary on the Old Testament. The Septuagint as Christian Scripture focuses on a key question: How did this collection of Jewish writings in the Greek language become the authoritative Old Testament Scripture in the Christian church? In the process of answering this question, Hengel touches on the development of the canon and the relationship between church fathers and Scripture.”

Hengel actually does something interesting in that, apparently, he disagrees to some extent with the person who wrote the introduction. Hengel says in the preface: “The important introductory essay which Prof. Dr. Robert Hanhart, the great Septuagint scholar, contributed to this volume goes back to a Tubingen Oberseminar during the winter term of 1990/1. At this Oberseminar I delivered a short version of my book which on the whole has a long and complicated history. His opinion deviated from mine on several points, and this makes his contribution especially valuable. The problems of the Septuagint need open discussion.” (pp. xii-xiii)

I haven’t read far enough to discover on which points exactly their opinions diverge. There is a partial preview of the book on Google Books (if nothing else, the table of contents, can probably tell you as much about the contents of the book as the above blurb from amazon).
 

Cognomen

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Asteriktos said:
Out of curiosity, does anyone else have a specific translation that they'd recommend (I am not, of course, ignoring your suggestion Gebre :) )? I also had difficulties with The Brothers Karamazov.  The version I tried before (and still have, since I was planning on giving it another shot) is a Barnes and Noble edition translated by Constance Garnett.
Asteriktos, I recently purchased the Vintage Classics offering, translated by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky.  This is a new translation that came very highly recommended. 

Unfortunately, I can't personally attest to the translation's quality yet, but The New York Times Book Review wrote of Demons (I know you specifically asked about Brothers Karamazov, but these translators also recently did Demons and Crime & Punishment too) that "The merit in this edition... resides in the technical virtuosity of the translators ... They capture the feverishly intense, personal explosions of activity and emotion that manifest themselves in Russian life."
Specifically on Brothers Karamazov:
"This scrupulous rendition can only be welcomed.  It returns us a work we thought we knew, subtly altered and so made new again." -Washington Post Book World
"It may well be that Dostoevsky's [world], with all its resourceful energies of life and language, is only now--and through the medium of [this] new translation --beginning to come home to the English-speaking reader." -NY Review of Books.

Hope this helps.
 

Asteriktos

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Cognomen said:
Asteriktos, I recently purchased the Vintage Classics offering, translated by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky.  This is a new translation that came very highly recommended. 

Unfortunately, I can't personally attest to the translation's quality yet, but The New York Times Book Review wrote of Demons (I know you specifically asked about Brothers Karamazov, but these translators also recently did Demons and Crime & Punishment too) that "The merit in this edition... resides in the technical virtuosity of the translators ... They capture the feverishly intense, personal explosions of activity and emotion that manifest themselves in Russian life."
Specifically on Brothers Karamazov:
"This scrupulous rendition can only be welcomed.  It returns us a work we thought we knew, subtly altered and so made new again." -Washington Post Book World
"It may well be that Dostoevsky's [world], with all its resourceful energies of life and language, is only now--and through the medium of [this] new translation --beginning to come home to the English-speaking reader." -NY Review of Books.

Hope this helps.
Yes, thank you for the suggestion :)
 

chatelaa

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Ortho_cat said:
just started reading 'the case for god' by karen armstrong.
Let us know what you think of it.  I've wanted to read it, but I keep postponing it (for some reason!).  I think it's because it might be too academic for my tastes.  But let us know.
 

orthonorm

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JLatimer said:
Rereading Homer's Odyssey.
Given your screen name, I hope it is the Lattimore translation. Or if in the Greek, God have mercy on you.

 

orthonorm

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Asteriktos said:
The Septuagint as Christian Scripture: It's Prehistory and the Problem of Its Canon, by Martin Hengel
Transmission of the Text of the Holy Bible, by Constantine Siamakis
Thank you for the reminder about Hengel. He fell off my radar.
 

biro

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"Faceless Killers," by Henning Mankell. It was book one of the Kurt Wallander series.
 

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The Idiot- Dostoevsky

and rereading: Fathers of the Eastern Church

Waiting list:
Moby Dick- Melville
The Reivers- Faulkner
Love in the Time of Cholera- Marquez
 

Asteriktos

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Father Seraphim Rose: His Life and Works, by Hieromonk Damascene

I haven't read this new version yet, and it was probably 8 years ago that I read the Not of This World version, so I've probably forgotten quite a bit. This book has had a huge impact on my priest since he read it a year ago... maybe there'll be a similar result with me  :)
 

theistgal

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"About Time", a collection of wonderful short stories (most dealing with time travel) by the late great +Jack Finney.  (He also wrote some great novels, like "Invasion of the Body Snatchers" and "Time and Again".)
 

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chatelaa said:
Ortho_cat said:
just started reading 'the case for god' by karen armstrong.
Let us know what you think of it.  I've wanted to read it, but I keep postponing it (for some reason!).  I think it's because it might be too academic for my tastes.  But let us know.
I thought it was an interesting journey through the history of religion, philosophy, and christianity particularly as she shows how humanity has searched for the transcendant reality. Her chapter entitled "silence" which focuses on the eastern mystical spirituality particular to Orthodoxy is worth the read, IMO. She has very liberal views about God and the Bible in general, but her message that conveyed humanities need for contemplating the transcendant in one form or another was convincing.
 

Asteriktos

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Ortho_cat said:
Right now I started reading "The Heart of Christianity" by M. Borg.
Fear the Borg!  ;)  Seriously though, I remember reading a few books by him before I became Orthodox... something like "Meeting Jesus Again for the First Time" and something else. I disagreed with him, even then, but I thought his heart was in the right place. *shrugs*

Ortho_cat said:
Asteriktos said:
The Way of a Pilgrim
First time?
I think this is about the third time... maybe 3 1/2. The first couple times though I just couldn't really get out of it what lots of other people do. I liked it and all, I just didn't see it as a spiritual classic. It's growing on me more with each time I read it though, I think.
 

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Asteriktos said:
Fear the Borg!  ;)  Seriously though, I remember reading a few books by him before I became Orthodox... something like "Meeting Jesus Again for the First Time" and something else. I disagreed with him, even then, but I thought his heart was in the right place. *shrugs*
Yes, I'm trying to get a picture of Christianity through different people's eyes; most lately those of liberal scholars.
 

stavros_388

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Asteriktos said:
The Way of a Pilgrim
I found that book in a little used bookstore while tree planting in Northern Saskatchewan maybe 12 years ago. That is the book that first introduced me to Orthodox spirituality, and remains a favorite of mine.

 

stavros_388

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Asteriktos said:
Ortho_cat said:
Right now I started reading "The Heart of Christianity" by M. Borg.
Fear the Borg!  ;)  Seriously though, I remember reading a few books by him before I became Orthodox... something like "Meeting Jesus Again for the First Time" and something else. I disagreed with him, even then, but I thought his heart was in the right place. *shrugs*

Ortho_cat said:
Asteriktos said:
The Way of a Pilgrim
First time?
I think this is about the third time... maybe 3 1/2. The first couple times though I just couldn't really get out of it what lots of other people do. I liked it and all, I just didn't see it as a spiritual classic. It's growing on me more with each time I read it though, I think.
I read Borg many years ago. My opinion at the time: he strips Christianity of its mythical aspects entirely, leaving little else but humanism... with a tip of the hat to Jesus.
 

stavros_388

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Ortho_cat said:
just started reading 'the case for god' by karen armstrong.
Did you get very far with this?
I own it, but have yet to read the whole thing. I personally find a lot in common with her overall approach to religion and my own.
 

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stavros_388 said:
Ortho_cat said:
just started reading 'the case for god' by karen armstrong.
Did you get very far with this?
I own it, but have yet to read the whole thing. I personally find a lot in common with her overall approach to religion and my own.
Yes, I read most of it. I posted my review of it a few posts earlier.
 

Ortho_cat

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stavros_388 said:
Asteriktos said:
Ortho_cat said:
Right now I started reading "The Heart of Christianity" by M. Borg.
Fear the Borg!  ;)  Seriously though, I remember reading a few books by him before I became Orthodox... something like "Meeting Jesus Again for the First Time" and something else. I disagreed with him, even then, but I thought his heart was in the right place. *shrugs*

Ortho_cat said:
Asteriktos said:
The Way of a Pilgrim
First time?
I think this is about the third time... maybe 3 1/2. The first couple times though I just couldn't really get out of it what lots of other people do. I liked it and all, I just didn't see it as a spiritual classic. It's growing on me more with each time I read it though, I think.
I read Borg many years ago. My opinion at the time: he strips Christianity of its mythical aspects entirely, leaving little else but humanism... with a tip of the hat to Jesus.
So far I seem to like how he addresses faith. He addressed 4 different meanings of faith, empasizing the types that focus on faith of the heart (3) rather than the head (1).
 

stavros_388

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stavros_388 said:
Asteriktos said:
Ortho_cat said:
Right now I started reading "The Heart of Christianity" by M. Borg.
Fear the Borg!  ;)  Seriously though, I remember reading a few books by him before I became Orthodox... something like "Meeting Jesus Again for the First Time" and something else. I disagreed with him, even then, but I thought his heart was in the right place. *shrugs*

Ortho_cat said:
Asteriktos said:
The Way of a Pilgrim
First time?
I think this is about the third time... maybe 3 1/2. The first couple times though I just couldn't really get out of it what lots of other people do. I liked it and all, I just didn't see it as a spiritual classic. It's growing on me more with each time I read it though, I think.
I read Borg many years ago. My opinion at the time: he strips Christianity of its mythical aspects entirely, leaving little else but humanism... with a tip of the hat to Jesus.
Sorry sorry sorry... I got Borg mixed up with Spong! Haven't read Borg, actually. :)
 

Gebre Menfes Kidus

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The Gurus, the Young Man, and Elder Paisios by Dionysios Farasiotos.

One of the best books I've ever read. Wow! I wish to express my gratitude to Ionnis and Andrew 21091 for recommending this powerful, frightening, but ultimately inspiring autobiographical account. This is the personal story a "spiritual seeker's" deliverance from demonic possession and his embrace of the Orthodox Faith. This is one of those books that I just couldn't put down. Even when I knew I shouldn't be reading it right before I went to sleep, I just couldn't help myself. You will most likely need to order this book from Amazon, as none of the bookstores I contacted were able to order it for me.

http://www.amazon.com/Gurus-Young-Man-Elder-Paisios/dp/1887904166

Selam
 

theistgal

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"The Queen's Fool" by Philippa Gregory (author of "The Other Boleyn Girl")

I'm into the Tudors (my husband says he prefers the 4-doors! :D ).
 

biro

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"The Holy Orthodox Church," by Sebastian Dabovich.  :angel:

Also: "The Coldest Blood," by Jim Kelly (not related to the quarterback), and "Skeleton Crew," by Stephen King, which I read when it came out 25 years ago and is better than I remember.
 

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Fr. George said:
Starting Byzantium: The Surprising Life of a Medieval Empire by Judith Herrin.
Good academic study of the subject; she does a few things that drive me nuts (like persisting in her use of the name "Byzantine" throughout the book).

Fr. George said:
Re-reading Partakers of Divine Nature by Archimandrite Christoforos Stavropoulos (transl. Fr. Stanley Harakas) for a book study I'll be leading soon.
Still reading it; and it's still an awesome book.

Fr. George said:
And still trudging through The Way of the Spirit: Reflections on Life in God by Archimandrite Aimilianos of Simonopetra.  As soon as I finish this one, I'll move on to C.S. Lewis' The Four Loves.
This has been put on hold to read (with wifey) "Husband Coached Childbirth" by Bradley.
 

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Reading St. Ignatius of Brianchaninov's "On the Jesus Prayer". Anybody who read the book recommend to me a particular section?
 

Rafa999

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Great Books :

-Chronicle of Arbela
-Life of Rabban Hurmizd
-Apology of Christianity by Patriarch Timothy I

Essential reading...
 
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