What is everyone reading?

Andrew21091

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I'm reading the Northern Thebaid: Monastic Saints of the Russian North. I've had the book for a while and I don't know why it took me so long to start reading it. It's a really great book.
 

Alveus Lacuna

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Religion and Social Formation in Korea: Minjung and Millenarianism by Sang Taek Lee

Living the Liturgy by Stanley S. Harakas
 

Ebor

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Schultz said:
I'm reading "Tolkien and the Great War" by John Garth. 

Ebor said:
I started Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell
I've started that book twice now and can't really get into it.  It's a shame because it appears to be right up my alley. :(
I'd like to read Tolkien and the Great War some time.  This is, I think, the third time I started Strange/Norrell and I've managed to get about a third of the way in.  There's a book of shorter stories set in the same 'world' The Ladies of Grace Adieu which I'd gotten from the library after my last attempt and I enjoyed it. It might have helped ease the way in to the big novel, as it were.  It also might have been useful that I'm reading it from a 3 book set, so it's easier to carry about instead of a Tome.  ;)

Ebor
 

Ebor

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EofK said:
Ebor said:
I started Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell
I loved that book!  It's a little slow-moving but the story is interesting.
I quite agree with you on that.  Have you read the short stories that I mentioned to Schultz?
 

EofK

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Ebor said:
EofK said:
Ebor said:
I started Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell
I loved that book!  It's a little slow-moving but the story is interesting.
I quite agree with you on that.  Have you read the short stories that I mentioned to Schultz?
No, I didn't realize they existed.  I'll have to check them out.  FWIW, Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell gets a lot more exciting in the last third of the book.  It seems like she takes a long time to build up the characters and history behind them and then she starts tying up loose ends suddenly.  Wasn't this her first novel?
 

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EofK said:
Ebor said:
EofK said:
Ebor said:
I started Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell
I loved that book!  It's a little slow-moving but the story is interesting.
I quite agree with you on that.  Have you read the short stories that I mentioned to Schultz?
No, I didn't realize they existed.  I'll have to check them out.  FWIW, Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell gets a lot more exciting in the last third of the book.  It seems like she takes a long time to build up the characters and history behind them and then she starts tying up loose ends suddenly.  Wasn't this her first novel?
My father, a United Methodist man of the cloth, loves the book.  He claims it is an elaborate satire on Methodism. 
DanM
 

Ebor

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DanM said:
EofK said:
Ebor said:
EofK said:
Ebor said:
I started Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell
I loved that book!  It's a little slow-moving but the story is interesting.
I quite agree with you on that.  Have you read the short stories that I mentioned to Schultz?
No, I didn't realize they existed.  I'll have to check them out.  FWIW, Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell gets a lot more exciting in the last third of the book.  It seems like she takes a long time to build up the characters and history behind them and then she starts tying up loose ends suddenly.  Wasn't this her first novel?
My father, a United Methodist man of the cloth, loves the book.  He claims it is an elaborate satire on Methodism. 
DanM
That sounds rather like something that would have fit in the time and setting of the book and it intrigues me.  Would you please explain a bit about your father's idea?  This could be a good literary discussion, I think.

Ebor
 

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DIXI  My father, a United Methodist man of the cloth, loves the book.  He claims it is an elaborate satire on Methodism. 

EBOR DIXIT  That sounds rather like something that would have fit in the time and setting of the book and it intrigues me.  Would you please explain a bit about your father's idea?  This could be a good literary discussion, I think.

DICO  1st, note that the author is the daughter of a Methodist clergyman.  Then observe that you find in the beginning of the book a meeting of magicians who do no magic, but like to talk about its history:  he felt that mirrored his Methodist seminary.  The title characters were eccentric because they actually did magic:  one apparently does find the occasional believer, even in the faculty of a seminary.  This reminds me of a conversation I had with an English pastor who recalled classmates at Cambridge who would from time to time ask their seminary professors if they actually believed what they were teaching, and the retort was, "No, of course we don't."
Two comparable authors deserve mention:  Tolkien's crypto-Catholic Middle Earth and Calvinist Rowling's Harry (It's your destiny) Potter.

DanM


DanM
 

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Truth and Tolerance, Cardinal Ratzinger/Pope Benedict

Fundamentals of Catholic Dogma, Cardinal Ratzinger/Pope Benedict
 

EofK

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DanM said:
DIXI  My father, a United Methodist man of the cloth, loves the book.  He claims it is an elaborate satire on Methodism. 

EBOR DIXIT  That sounds rather like something that would have fit in the time and setting of the book and it intrigues me.  Would you please explain a bit about your father's idea?  This could be a good literary discussion, I think.

DICO  1st, note that the author is the daughter of a Methodist clergyman.  Then observe that you find in the beginning of the book a meeting of magicians who do no magic, but like to talk about its history:  he felt that mirrored his Methodist seminary.  The title characters were eccentric because they actually did magic:  one apparently does find the occasional believer, even in the faculty of a seminary.  This reminds me of a conversation I had with an English pastor who recalled classmates at Cambridge who would from time to time ask their seminary professors if they actually believed what they were teaching, and the retort was, "No, of course we don't."
Two comparable authors deserve mention:  Tolkien's crypto-Catholic Middle Earth and Calvinist Rowling's Harry (It's your destiny) Potter.

DanM


DanM
Interesting indeed!
 

Órëlaurëa

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EofK said:
No, I didn't realize they existed.  I'll have to check them out.  FWIW, Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell gets a lot more exciting in the last third of the book.  It seems like she takes a long time to build up the characters and history behind them and then she starts tying up loose ends suddenly.  Wasn't this her first novel?
Liz has the Ladies of Grace Adieu. . . but likely it's all packed away, so it does you no good whatsoever.

I tried to read Jonathan Strange, but couldn't get into it at all. I recently picked up the hardcover for $1, and it is resting upon my reading shelf as we speak. Perhaps someday I'll get back to trying it again. :D
 

Fr. George

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Working on yet another reading of Runciman's The Fall of Constantinople.
 

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Currently reading :

The latest issue of Smithsonian
The Pale Horse by Agatha Christie (this is for work.  sort of.)
 

Ebor

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DanM said:
DICO  1st, note that the author is the daughter of a Methodist clergyman.  Then observe that you find in the beginning of the book a meeting of magicians who do no magic, but like to talk about its history:  he felt that mirrored his Methodist seminary.  The title characters were eccentric because they actually did magic:  one apparently does find the occasional believer, even in the faculty of a seminary.  This reminds me of a conversation I had with an English pastor who recalled classmates at Cambridge who would from time to time ask their seminary professors if they actually believed what they were teaching, and the retort was, "No, of course we don't."
Two comparable authors deserve mention:  Tolkien's crypto-Catholic Middle Earth and Calvinist Rowling's Harry (It's your destiny) Potter.
DanM
Thank you, DanM.  That is indeed interesting.

I do not think that Harry Potter is all destiny, though.  The point about having choices and doing what's right is also part of the world that Rowling created.

If you have time, could you expand a bit on Tolkien and Rowling, please?

Oh yes, and my class reading is on the political structure of Nigeria.


Ebor
 

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I saw it referenced here on this website, so I picked up From the Holy Mountain: Among the Christians of the Middle East by Dalrymple. It's fascinating!

And I found a neat little book called How to Live a Holy Life by Metropolitan Gregory of Saint Petersburg, that I'm slowing working through.
 

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cleveland said:
Lily said:
The Pale Horse by Agatha Christie (this is for work.  sort of.)
That's my kind of work!
Less glam than it sounds, but it's certainly more palatable than plowing thru Titus Andronicus was!
 

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I'm slowly reading A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson and Alton Brown's I'm Just Here for the Food.  I think both of these should be used as textbooks... they're very informative and interesting and you don't typically get those in the same book.
 

ytterbiumanalyst

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I just began Orhan Pamuk's Snow, about (among other things) the conflict between Muslims and Christians in Istanbul. I bought in when he first wrote it about five years ago, but priorities caused me to delay reading it. I'm really glad I finally did get to, though. He's a talented writer who uses a nonchalant style that makes the story seem somewhat distant. It's quite interesting to me.
 
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