What is everyone reading?

John Larocque

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Nearly done Lossky's "Mystical theology of the Eastern Church". It appears I ordered one of the last copies, as SVS press no longer lists the title in its online catalog. I had to read a couple of chapters twice but am near the end. The subject matter is difficult but not impossible, and my Zen and Buddhist readings from a few years ago already gave me a healthy introduction into the "apophatic" headspace.

Also ordered and just started Olivier Clement's "Roots of Christian Mysticism," which includes some several Western fathers as well, and a biography of each father at the back.

 

livefreeordie

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Robert Penn Warren's - "Wilderness:A Tale of the Civil War".  We graduated from the same school and I've always wanted to read more of him. It's pretty good so far.
 

Alveus Lacuna

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The Desert Fathers: Sayings of the Early Christian Monks (Penguin Classics), translated from the Latin by Benedicta Ward.
 

Alveus Lacuna

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Gebre Menfes Kidus said:
Cool. I love that cover!
You should read it.  Being Oriental Orthodox, it should have a special place in your heart, as it represents Egyptian monasticism and the traditions of Alexandrian Christianity that helped to form the Ethiopian church's identity.  This collection of writings continues to inspire monks East and West in all communions.  It is powerful stuff.
 

scamandrius

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Sailing from Byzantium by Colin Wells.

The Roman Empire by Colin Wells.

Living Tradition by +Fr. John Meyendorff.

The Consolation of Philosophy by Boethius.
 

Gebre Menfes Kidus

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Alveus Lacuna said:
Gebre Menfes Kidus said:
Cool. I love that cover!
You should read it.  Being Oriental Orthodox, it should have a special place in your heart, as it represents Egyptian monasticism and the traditions of Alexandrian Christianity that helped to form the Ethiopian church's identity.  This collection of writings continues to inspire monks East and West in all communions.  It is powerful stuff.
I'll get try to get it soon.

I recently got my four volumes of the Philokalia, and have begun reading through it. Will the book you mention be superfluous in relation to the Philokalia, or does it contain totally different material from different Fathers?

Forgive my ignorance.

Selam
 

Alveus Lacuna

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Gebre Menfes Kidus said:
Will the book you mention be superfluous in relation to the Philokalia, or does it contain totally different material from different Fathers?
Partially.  I doubt all of the material contained in this book will be in the Philokalia, but a good portion of it probably will be.  You might as well skip this book.
 

Gebre Menfes Kidus

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Alveus Lacuna said:
Gebre Menfes Kidus said:
Will the book you mention be superfluous in relation to the Philokalia, or does it contain totally different material from different Fathers?
Partially.  I doubt all of the material contained in this book will be in the Philokalia, but a good portion of it probably will be.  You might as well skip this book.
I may get it anyway. If nothng else, I love that cover! Who is the Saint pictured on the front? Is that St. Antony?

Selam
 

Alveus Lacuna

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Yes, it is.  A Hippocentaur is showing him the way to St. Paul the Hermit.

How are we moderns (post-moderns?!? ;) ) meant to understand the mythological creatures appearing in these stories, anyway?
 

Gebre Menfes Kidus

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Alveus Lacuna said:
Yes, it is.  A Hippocentaur is showing him the way to St. Paul the Hermit.

How are we moderns (post-moderns?!? ;) ) meant to understand the mythological creatures appearing in these stories, anyway?
Wow. I thought it might be a picture of St. Antony reading the Scriptures in the presence of some demonic creature. I know from Athanasius' Life of Antony that he encountered all manner of demonic visions- hideous creatures as well as angelic-looking beings. But St. Antony never listened to any of them, because he knew they were all from the devil. So I doubt if he would have listened to a "hippocentaur." But I could be wrong. What do you tihink?

Selam
 

Alveus Lacuna

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All I have is a reference to the incident in the introduction to the work; I have no additional context outside of this quote:

"He caught sight of a creature who was half man and half horse, to which the poets have given the name of Hippocentaur.  At the sight of it he protected himself by making the life-giving sign on his own forehead, and said, 'Hey you, where does the servant of God live?  The creature...indicated a desire for friendly communication.  Stretching out his right hand he indicated the route that Anthony was seeking" (Desert Fathers, p. xii).

So it seems that he took some caution initially in case it was an evil apparition, but ultimately he ended up being a friendly character.  This sort of thing just seems outright bizarre to a modern mind, although I suppose the postmodern mind can do some fun things with it.  Either way, I was wondering if the meaning of the character is more plain than simple plot development.
 

Gebre Menfes Kidus

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Alveus Lacuna said:
All I have is a reference to the incident in the introduction to the work; I have no additional context outside of this quote:

"He caught sight of a creature who was half man and half horse, to which the poets have given the name of Hippocentaur.  At the sight of it he protected himself by making the life-giving sign on his own forehead, and said, 'Hey you, where does the servant of God live?  The creature...indicated a desire for friendly communication.  Stretching out his right hand he indicated the route that Anthony was seeking" (Desert Fathers, p. xii).

So it seems that he took some caution initially in case it was an evil apparition, but ultimately he ended up being a friendly character.  This sort of thing just seems outright bizarre to a modern mind, although I suppose the postmodern mind can do some fun things with it.  Either way, I was wondering if the meaning of the character is more plain than simple plot development.
Very interesting indeed. I'd love to know more about this story. It must have been a vision, since "hippocentaurs" could not have been actual physical creatures of this earthly realm.

Selam
 

Jibrail Almuhajir

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Alveus Lacuna said:
Yes, it is.  A Hippocentaur is showing him the way to St. Paul the Hermit.

How are we moderns (post-moderns?!? ;) ) meant to understand the mythological creatures appearing in these stories, anyway?
Way ahead of ya'.  :)

http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php/topic,12689.0.html
 

Gebre Menfes Kidus

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GabrieltheCelt said:
Alveus Lacuna said:
Yes, it is.  A Hippocentaur is showing him the way to St. Paul the Hermit.

How are we moderns (post-moderns?!? ;) ) meant to understand the mythological creatures appearing in these stories, anyway?
Way ahead of ya'.  :)

http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php/topic,12689.0.html
OK, here are my uneducated thoughts on this subject. I believe that theoretically unicorns, dragons, and the leviathon could have actually existed. But these half man half horse "centaur" creatures seem to violate the biblical account of Creation. Humans were created specifically and uniquely in the image of God, and thus there can be no such thing as a partial human. But unicorns, dragons, and leviathon do not do violence to the Creation account, nor do they undermine the sanctity of human life.

What do you think?

Selam
 

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Nebelpfade said:
Johannes Scotus Eriugena's De divisione naturae
An Orthodox Evaluation of Certain Teachings in the Writings
of John Scotus Eriugena
in Light of the Theology of St Gregory Palamas

by Deacon Geoffrey Ready


http://web.archive.org/web/20031210140924/http://www.nireland.com/orthodox/eriugena.htm

He makes a pathetic and not undignified figure, this eager, slightly-built Irishman,
with his subtle mind, his studious habits, his deeply reverent spirit,
his almost fanatical devotion to the wise men of former days,
Pagan or Christian, who had lived in the light of a wider civilisation:
called upon to fight the battles of the West with arms forged in the East,
and reprimanded even in the hour of conquest for having transgressed the rules of the field.

Alice Gardner, Studies in John the Scot.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

He deviated from the path of the Latins
while he kept his eyes intently fixed on the Greeks;
wherefore he was reputed an heretic.

William of Malmesbury, de Pontificibus.

John Scotus Eriugena stands as a remarkable figure in the spiritual history of the Christian West. His native Ireland was insula sanctorum — the "Isle of the Saints," where Orthodox Christianity, planted by Saint Pádraig in the fifth century, had taken such root that it had created an entire monastic culture and produced countless thousands of glorified saints. By the ninth century, however, the Apostolic and Patristic Tradition of glorification which had transformed Ireland was coming under an attack which would ultimately prove more devastating than those of the Vikings who were by now violently raiding monastic settlements along the Irish coasts.​
 
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