What is everyone reading?

orthonorm

Hoplitarches
Joined
Jul 24, 2010
Messages
17,715
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Romaios said:
orthonorm said:
Romaios said:
IIRC that work of Heidegger's had a somewhat anti-capitalistic gist. He claimed to be horrified by the "enframing"/exploitation of human labour.
To place Heidegger within such categories is to miss the point, which is almost always the case.
I was trying to make him more palatable to Augustin. But that seems to be a lost cause...

augustin717 said:
Rufus said:
I really don't know what to say to that.
How did the wheel enframe locomotion perhaps?
Augustin needs to discuss such matters over a beer or the like. A symposium if you will.

Really, the old nazi would be quite comforted by Augustin's trust in his volksdasein.
 

Achronos

Toumarches
Site Supporter
Joined
Oct 31, 2010
Messages
13,265
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Location
House Of Balloons
orthonorm said:
Shiny said:
orthonorm said:
Jetavan said:
Care to offer a review once you are finished?
Youd love his book on atheists lol.
I dunno. I liked his essay on baseball and time.
His book on theodicy was a little weak from what I remember. But then again what argument for that is ever strong?

From an amazon.com review in that link:
Hart will help you to understand intellectually why trying to have an ontology without The Ground of our Being (aka God) is like unto trying to have Being and Not Being at the same time. This book is a pretty thorough development of ideas and takes on all the serious naturalists with respect. Thus, not a polemic but an honest bit of philosophy for the honest and open reader.
 

Jetavan

Taxiarches
Joined
Feb 15, 2007
Messages
7,007
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Website
www.esoteric.msu.edu
Jetavan said:
Hart's argument is directed toward the New Atheist, especially those who claim that the existence of 'God', being potentially empirically verifiable, has not been scientifically confirmed. Victor Stenger on the 'God Hypothesis' (see, e.g., here) is one example of such.

Stenger writes: "The scientific method is not limited to what professional scientists do but can be applied to any question that relates to observations." He also notes that that the deities most people worship are deities that have an effect on the natural world (e.g., miracles).

Hart's emphasis, though, is on the 'deity' who makes existence itself (including all 'deities') possible. He terms this 'deity' 'God', the 'God' of classical theism. He differentiates God -- which is the only true 'God' -- with a 'deity', a 'god', who is inherently separate from its creation, manipulating its creation like a potter manipulates his clay to produce a clay pot, a potter whose death does not alter the existence of the now-made clay pot. The true 'God', however, is that which makes anything possible, and whose non-existence would necessarily mean the non-existence of all beings. Such God is not observable, and not even theoretically empirically verifiable.

Fortunately, Hart does include a chapter where he discusses how contemplative prayer is able to put one into communion with God, and how contemplative prayer is the 'method' that can confirm whether God exists, but this method does not involve 'observation' or 'empiricism'. It involves going deeply into the second characteristic of God (and of ourselves) -- consciousness (the first being 'existence' itself). Hart notes that contemplative prayer, of one sort or another, is associated with all types of theistic traditions, from Christianity to Vedanta to Sufism to Judaism and so forth (even, he hints, to Theravada Buddhism, but I digress).

The source of all being is also absolutely conscious, and the consciousness of the source of all being is inherently blissful, thus giving us the third characteristic of God: all-bliss, all-joy, which is reflected in the human desire for the 'good' (which desire even supposed 'atheists' have). Hart then ties this desire for good as posing problems for evolutionary theory's supposition that altruism can be explained by means of natural selection. Personally, I found his critique of evolution in this regard less than satisfying, but I appreciated his critique of Intelligent Design as a theology of a lesser 'god' and not the true God.

I found his idea intriguing that modern atheism is not so much the result of more scientific information, but of a modern forgetting of what God really is, the mystery of being itself. In this way, much of what passes for Christian theology is actually simply another form of this forgetting, another form of atheism. Whereas the New Atheists rejects 'god', much of modern Christian theology defends 'god', being oblivious to God.
 

orthonorm

Hoplitarches
Joined
Jul 24, 2010
Messages
17,715
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Jetavan said:
Jetavan said:
Hart's argument is directed toward the New Atheist, especially those who claim that the existence of 'God', being potentially empirically verifiable, has not been scientifically confirmed. Victor Stenger on the 'God Hypothesis' (see, e.g., here) is one example of such.

Stenger writes: "The scientific method is not limited to what professional scientists do but can be applied to any question that relates to observations." He also notes that that the deities most people worship are deities that have an effect on the natural world (e.g., miracles).

Hart's emphasis, though, is on the 'deity' who makes existence itself (including all 'deities') possible. He terms this 'deity' 'God', the 'God' of classical theism. He differentiates God -- which is the only true 'God' -- with a 'deity', a 'god', who is inherently separate from its creation, manipulating its creation like a potter manipulates his clay to produce a clay pot, a potter whose death does not alter the existence of the now-made clay pot. The true 'God', however, is that which makes anything possible, and whose non-existence would necessarily mean the non-existence of all beings. Such God is not observable, and not even theoretically empirically verifiable.

Fortunately, Hart does include a chapter where he discusses how contemplative prayer is able to put one into communion with God, and how contemplative prayer is the 'method' that can confirm whether God exists, but this method does not involve 'observation' or 'empiricism'. It involves going deeply into the second characteristic of God (and of ourselves) -- consciousness (the first being 'existence' itself). Hart notes that contemplative prayer, of one sort or another, is associated with all types of theistic traditions, from Christianity to Vedanta to Sufism to Judaism and so forth (even, he hints, to Theravada Buddhism, but I digress).

The source of all being is also absolutely conscious, and the consciousness of the source of all being is inherently blissful, thus giving us the third characteristic of God: all-bliss, all-joy, which is reflected in the human desire for the 'good' (which desire even supposed 'atheists' have). Hart then ties this desire for good as posing problems for evolutionary theory's supposition that altruism can be explained by means of natural selection. Personally, I found his critique of evolution in this regard less than satisfying, but I appreciated his critique of Intelligent Design as a theology of a lesser 'god' and not the true God.

I found his idea intriguing that modern atheism is not so much the result of more scientific information, but of a modern forgetting of what God really is, the mystery of being itself. In this way, much of what passes for Christian theology is actually simply another form of this forgetting, another form of atheism. Whereas the New Atheists rejects 'god', much of modern Christian theology defends 'god', being oblivious to God.
Thanks. He seems to like Seinsvergessenheit to make hay. I always wonder what he has to say that theologians who have attempted to appropriated Heidegger already haven't.
 

Asteriktos

Hypatos
Joined
Oct 4, 2002
Messages
39,121
Reaction score
44
Points
48
Age
41

It's about black metal. And stuff. Lots of pictures. Semi-coffee-table book kind of thing I guess? Anyway, looks interesting enough.


Sort of a light overview of the Dragon Age universe. A bit meh really.

Also rereading the collection of texts by John Henry Newman titled: Conscience, Consensus, and the Development of Doctrine. I hope to take some notes this time around and when I'm done perhaps start a thread on the topic... hopefully one that doesn't devolve into the usual stuff. :angel:
 

orthonorm

Hoplitarches
Joined
Jul 24, 2010
Messages
17,715
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Asteriktos said:

It's about black metal. And stuff. Lots of pictures. Semi-coffee-table book kind of thing I guess? Anyway, looks interesting enough.


Sort of a light overview of the Dragon Age universe. A bit meh really.

Also rereading the collection of texts by John Henry Newman titled: Conscience, Consensus, and the Development of Doctrine. I hope to take some notes this time around and when I'm done perhaps start a thread on the topic... hopefully one that doesn't devolve into the usual stuff. :angel:
I thought you were gone.

Oh well . . .
 

Asteriktos

Hypatos
Joined
Oct 4, 2002
Messages
39,121
Reaction score
44
Points
48
Age
41
orthonorm said:
I thought you were gone.

Oh well . . .
I'll be gone when I'm gone, which may or may not be soon. Until then, feel free to bask in my [idiosyncrasies]...
 

Opus118

Protokentarchos
Site Supporter
Joined
Jun 18, 2005
Messages
3,944
Reaction score
1
Points
38
Age
69
Location
Oceanside, California
Gebre Menfes Kidus said:
I'm only 1500 pages into this one. So far it's a bit dry.




Selam
This is just to mention that some people recognize this person as Professor Irwin Corey, who deserves to be named rather than ignored. I agree he would not have written about this topic.
 

Luke

Taxiarches
Joined
Dec 5, 2008
Messages
7,040
Reaction score
8
Points
38
The Growth of Medieval Theology (600-1300) / Jaroslav Pelikan. V. 2 of the series: The Christian Tradition: a History of the Development of Doctrine.
 

Asteriktos

Hypatos
Joined
Oct 4, 2002
Messages
39,121
Reaction score
44
Points
48
Age
41
Gamliel said:
The Growth of Medieval Theology (600-1300) / Jaroslav Pelikan. V. 2 of the series: The Christian Tradition: a History of the Development of Doctrine.
V. 3, no? I read it earlier this year, and thought I'd like it more than I did. Hope you enjoy it more :)
 

Luke

Taxiarches
Joined
Dec 5, 2008
Messages
7,040
Reaction score
8
Points
38
^ Yes, v.3.  I read your earlier post and read vols. 1 & 2 and now 3.  Sometimes the author rushes from one theologian to another.  I take it he assumes we already know some about the history of doctrine, but I do not.  I still find it informative and overall am glad I am reading the series.
 

Rufus

OC.Net Guru
Joined
Mar 4, 2010
Messages
1,337
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
30
Location
Massachusetts
Gamliel said:
The Growth of Medieval Theology (600-1300) / Jaroslav Pelikan. V. 2 of the series: The Christian Tradition: a History of the Development of Doctrine.
I'm readin #5.
 

Luke

Taxiarches
Joined
Dec 5, 2008
Messages
7,040
Reaction score
8
Points
38
^ What do you think of it?  Did you read v.4?
 

Achronos

Toumarches
Site Supporter
Joined
Oct 31, 2010
Messages
13,265
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Location
House Of Balloons
I like this a lot.

FERNANDO PESSOA / ÁLVARO DE CAMPOS
TABACARIA
Tobacco Shop
http://leoleituraescrita.blogspot.com/2010/02/tabacaria-tobacco-shop-fernando-pessoa.html

I am nothing.
Never I'll be anything.
I cannot wish to be anything.
Aside from this, I have within me all the dreams of the world.

Windows of my bedroom,
Of my bedroom of one of the world's millions nobody knows who is
(And if they knew who is, what would they know?)
Give access to the mystery of a street constantly crossed by people.
To a street inaccessible to all of thoughts,
Real, impossibly real, certain, unknowingly certain,
With the mystery of things beneath the stones and beings,
With death putting dampness in the walls and men's white hairs,
With Destiny driving the wagon of everything through the road of nothing.

Today I am defeated, as if I knew the truth.
Today I am lucid, as if I were about to die
And had no more brotherhood with things
Than a goodbye, becoming this house and this streetside
A row of train wagons, and a whistled departure
From inside my head,
And a jolt of my nerves and a grind of bones on the going.

Today I am perplexed, as one who wondered and found and forgot.
Today I am divided between the loyalty I owe
To the Tobacco Shop on the other side of the street, as external real thing,
And to the feeling that everything is a dream, as inward real thing.

I have failed in everything.
And since I had no purposes, maybe everything was nothing.
The learning they gave me,
I go down from this by the window at the back of the house.
I went to the open country with grand purposes.
But there I found only grass and trees,
And when there were people, they were just as other.
I move away from the window, I sit in a chair. What shall I think about ?

More in the link.
 

xOrthodox4Christx

Taxiarches
Joined
Apr 28, 2013
Messages
7,322
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Misquoting Jesus: The Story Behind Who Changed the Bible and Why, Bart Ehrman

I am also reading a few books by John Dominic Crossan and the Jesus Seminar. (I can anticipate the reactions, but I also read some conservative authors too)

Something interesting as I read The First Paul was that Crossan and Borg (a Catholic and Lutheran respectively) come to an Orthodox understanding of Paul's meaning of Justification and the Passion of Christ and he condemns the Protestant and Catholic view.
I think I may lend this book to some fundy friends. :) I might lend away Ehrman's too, when I am finished with it.

If anyone is wondering 'why' it's because my final paper is going to be on the Historical Jesus. And obviously textual criticism, interpretive philosophy and many sources are required for that.
 

Rufus

OC.Net Guru
Joined
Mar 4, 2010
Messages
1,337
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
30
Location
Massachusetts
Gamliel said:
^ What do you think of it?  Did you read v.4?
Haven't read any other part of the series. I picked this one up to get an introduction to modern theology, which I desperately need to know more about.

So far it is lacking in the penetrating analysis that I live for, but it is nonetheless serving as an excellent introductory textbook.
 

orthonorm

Hoplitarches
Joined
Jul 24, 2010
Messages
17,715
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Rufus said:
The Cambridge Companion to Arabic Philosophy.
A quick review when you are finished? Yeah, neah, that type of thing.
 
Top