What is everyone reading?

PeterTheAleut

Hypatos
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 8, 2006
Messages
37,280
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
48
Location
Portland, Oregon
Achronos said:
PeterTheAleut said:
What am I reading right now?

C# source code ;D
And you are up this late reading it? LOL
Hey, I'm working on my own .NET application project. This geek has to do something to keep his skills sharp while he's between jobs.
 

biro

Protostrator
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 31, 2010
Messages
23,166
Reaction score
9
Points
38
Age
47
Website
archiveofourown.org
I recently finished "The Pearl of Great Price," by Veronica Hughes. It's about her journey from New Age pseudo-religion into the Orthodox Church.

I am also reading "Sun and Shadow," by Ake Edwardson.
 

Volnutt

Hoplitarches
Joined
May 22, 2011
Messages
15,089
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
34
lol, for a split second I thought you meant "Pearl of Great Price" the Mormon book.
 

Asteriktos

Hypatos
Joined
Oct 4, 2002
Messages
39,103
Reaction score
33
Points
48
Age
41
The Illness and the Cure of the Soul in the Orthodox Tradition, by Met. Hierotheos

I tried reading this before, but got derailed because of some issues I was fretting over at the time. Hopefully I'm past those (non)issues and can actually get through the book this time :)
 

Asteriktos

Hypatos
Joined
Oct 4, 2002
Messages
39,103
Reaction score
33
Points
48
Age
41
Achronos said:
The Bible
That's so kvlt! I heard the Orthodox are coming out with a new edition of the Bible in which they add some stuff, like this text called 3 Maccabees. You should check it out!  ;D
 

Volnutt

Hoplitarches
Joined
May 22, 2011
Messages
15,089
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
34
The Anatomy of Fascism by Robert O. Paxton
 

Achronos

Toumarches
Site Supporter
Joined
Oct 31, 2010
Messages
13,265
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Location
House Of Balloons
Asteriktos said:
Achronos said:
The Bible
That's so kvlt! I heard the Orthodox are coming out with a new edition of the Bible in which they add some stuff, like this text called 3 Maccabees. You should check it out!  ;D
Oh you mean the OSB? I got that. But did you hear how the NOAB has 4 Maccabees, that's like that new thing man
 

Asteriktos

Hypatos
Joined
Oct 4, 2002
Messages
39,103
Reaction score
33
Points
48
Age
41
Achronos said:
Asteriktos said:
Achronos said:
The Bible
That's so kvlt! I heard the Orthodox are coming out with a new edition of the Bible in which they add some stuff, like this text called 3 Maccabees. You should check it out!  ;D
Oh you mean the OSB? I got that. But did you hear how the NOAB has 4 Maccabees, that's like that new thing man
Let's not push it. I don't go in for fads!
 

IsmiLiora

Archon
Joined
Mar 6, 2011
Messages
3,419
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
33
Lol u guiz

Nectar in a Sieve
by Kamala Markandaya. Re-reading because I have too much work to start anything new.
 

Iconodule

Hoplitarches
Joined
Jan 2, 2010
Messages
16,485
Reaction score
0
Points
36
Age
38
Location
PA, USA
Iconodule said:
Volnutt said:
Iconodule said:
The Devil's Horsemen: The Mongol Invasion of Europe This was a really entertaining and fascinating read.
One that topic, what do you think of Charles Halperin's Russia and the Golden Horde?
I'm getting that in the mail, probably tomorrow. I'll let you know after I read it.  :)
I finished this book. While the book has some very interesting information and arguments, I can't say I'd recommend it. Halperin writes in that annoying kind of academic language that I encountered so many times in my undergrad years, where the writer needs to constantly use the word "complex" to describe his new understanding of the topic, as opposed to the "simplistic" understanding of previous historians. It's a style that comes off at once as snooty and naive- I'm not sure what to call it. Would that more academics today were good writers rather than striving to impress fellow academics with their "complexity".

Anyway, back to the substance of the book- Halperin's basic thesis is that Russian medieval writers held to an "ideology of silence", whereby they consciously or unconsciously ignored and omitted uncomfortable aspects of the "Tatar Yoke" in their chronicles. Halperin may have a point to a degree, but his argument rests on a really faulty premise- he seems to believe that Christianity (and Islam too) forbade any friendly contact with "infidels", including borrowing their secular ideas and institutions (for example, the Mongols' yam postal system). He doesn't actually provide any evidence of such an attitude, only assumes it. Of course anyone familiar with the history of Orthodox Christianity will see how non-Christian practices were frequently and consciously "baptized" throughout its history. Overall Halperin has a very simplistic understanding of religion- there is one part where he questions the accuracy of the Kazan Chronicle where it says that Ivan III was told to reverence a portrait of Akhmad Khan, and he instead tramples it. Halperin says, "Akhmad and his envoys were Muslims- no portrait of him would have been allowed." This is like saying, "the Golden Horde was Muslim, therefore all the reports of them continuing to drink alcohol must be false."

The book is not without merit- there are a number of interesting episodes discussed, but never in enough detail. It's a very short book and much of it is devoted to Halperin's argumentation which isn't completely convincing. What he does successfully demonstrate, however, is that the Tatar influence on Russia was not one-sided or entirely detrimental, and also that many things that have been blamed on the "Tatar Yoke" might not necessarily be from the Tatars. But I think Halperin's best insights have already been included in more general histories such as Janet Martin's Medieval Russia, 980-1584.
 

Volnutt

Hoplitarches
Joined
May 22, 2011
Messages
15,089
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
34
Iconodule said:
Iconodule said:
Volnutt said:
Iconodule said:
The Devil's Horsemen: The Mongol Invasion of Europe This was a really entertaining and fascinating read.
One that topic, what do you think of Charles Halperin's Russia and the Golden Horde?
I'm getting that in the mail, probably tomorrow. I'll let you know after I read it.  :)
I finished this book. While the book has some very interesting information and arguments, I can't say I'd recommend it. Halperin writes in that annoying kind of academic language that I encountered so many times in my undergrad years, where the writer needs to constantly use the word "complex" to describe his new understanding of the topic, as opposed to the "simplistic" understanding of previous historians. It's a style that comes off at once as snooty and naive- I'm not sure what to call it. Would that more academics today were good writers rather than striving to impress fellow academics with their "complexity".

Anyway, back to the substance of the book- Halperin's basic thesis is that Russian medieval writers held to an "ideology of silence", whereby they consciously or unconsciously ignored and omitted uncomfortable aspects of the "Tatar Yoke" in their chronicles. Halperin may have a point to a degree, but his argument rests on a really faulty premise- he seems to believe that Christianity (and Islam too) forbade any friendly contact with "infidels", including borrowing their secular ideas and institutions (for example, the Mongols' yam postal system). He doesn't actually provide any evidence of such an attitude, only assumes it. Of course anyone familiar with the history of Orthodox Christianity will see how non-Christian practices were frequently and consciously "baptized" throughout its history. Overall Halperin has a very simplistic understanding of religion- there is one part where he questions the accuracy of the Kazan Chronicle where it says that Ivan III was told to reverence a portrait of Akhmad Khan, and he instead tramples it. Halperin says, "Akhmad and his envoys were Muslims- no portrait of him would have been allowed." This is like saying, "the Golden Horde was Muslim, therefore all the reports of them continuing to drink alcohol must be false."

The book is not without merit- there are a number of interesting episodes discussed, but never in enough detail. It's a very short book and much of it is devoted to Halperin's argumentation which isn't completely convincing. What he does successfully demonstrate, however, is that the Tatar influence on Russia was not one-sided or entirely detrimental, and also that many things that have been blamed on the "Tatar Yoke" might not necessarily be from the Tatars. But I think Halperin's best insights have already been included in more general histories such as Janet Martin's Medieval Russia, 980-1584.
lol, I must say the portrait vs. alcohol thing never occurred to me.

Good review! I agree totally about the way he writes and his view of "universalistic creeds," as he calls them. I also have Martin and I really enjoy it, both books were for my Medieval Russian History course.
 

Volnutt

Hoplitarches
Joined
May 22, 2011
Messages
15,089
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
34
Papist said:
The First Grace: Rediscovering the Natural Law in a Post-Christian World
That looks like a good one!
 
Top