What is everyone reading?

Volnutt

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There's a Devil in the Drum by John F. Lucy

The memoir of an Irish soldier who fought in World War I.
 

IsmiLiora

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Almost done with: On Paradise Drive: How We Live Now (And Always Have) in the Future Tense - David Brooks

A legit laugh out loud funny look at American suburbia today.

http://www.amazon.com/Paradise-Drive-Always-Future-Tense/dp/0743227387
 

vamrat

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Cognomen said:
Jominy's Précis de l'Art de la Guerre: Des Principales Combinaisons de la Stratégie, de la Grande Tactique et de la Politique Militaire.
&
Clausewitz' On War.
Who are you planning on invading?  I have Vom Krieg on my shelf and have indeed cracked the binding, but I cannot admit to having read it thoroughly.  When you finish and want something less Napoleonic I would suggest Brave New War by John Robb. 
 
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My friend is forcing To Kill a Mockingbird on me.

Maybe forty pages in and soooooo boring. Lee does a terrible job at capturing the mind and voice of a six year old.

Hope it improves.
 

vamrat

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How do some of you read so fast?  In the time since I posted that Clash of Civilizations was on order, Iconodule has recieved Devil's Horsemen and given Volnutt a review of it and IsmiLiora has read 27.8 books!

Meanwhile I started the third section section of CoC.  I have also bee reading Diplomacy by Henry Kissinger.  It covers diplomacy from the end of the 30 Years War up to the present (meaning sometime in the 90's when he wrote it).  I have gotten to just after the Hungarian Revolution and I started it in October.  2009!
 

Asteriktos

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I'm reading various essays by Nikolai Berdyaev. It's changing my life. No, seriously. ;D

Also, fast reading is nearly as important as fast eating. You do not eat to enjoy your food, rather you consume it to sustain life. Same with reading! If you're not reading at least a couple books a week, you're slowly dying. Admittedly, people who read a lot of books also die sometimes, but always from accidents or acts of God, never from "old age" or "natural causes". True fact.
 

IsmiLiora

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vamrat said:
How do some of you read so fast?  In the time since I posted that Clash of Civilizations was on order, Iconodule has recieved Devil's Horsemen and given Volnutt a review of it and IsmiLiora has read 27.8 books!

Meanwhile I started the third section section of CoC.  I have also bee reading Diplomacy by Henry Kissinger.  It covers diplomacy from the end of the 30 Years War up to the present (meaning sometime in the 90's when he wrote it).  I have gotten to just after the Hungarian Revolution and I started it in October.  2009!
LOL, I don't retain anything, so we're even.

I've never read COC (well, more than an excerpt), but I believed that there were some flaws in his premise when I read the article, so I never bothered. I read The Soldier and the State, which was quite interesting. I can't say more than that because military history is not my expertise at all. But I was fascinated.

I'm kind of wishing I had my copy of David Hackett Fischer's Albion's Seed: Four British Folkways in America (America: A Cultural History). MY professor thought he was all sorts of wrong, and maybe he was, but I LOVED that book. Even after the class ended I read it 3 times a year or so. Hm, I think I'll ask my sister to ship it too me. It is ridic heavy, though.
 

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vamrat said:
Cognomen said:
Jominy's Précis de l'Art de la Guerre: Des Principales Combinaisons de la Stratégie, de la Grande Tactique et de la Politique Militaire.
& Clausewitz' On War.
Who are you planning on invading?  I have Vom Krieg on my shelf and have indeed cracked the binding, but I cannot admit to having read it thoroughly.  When you finish and want something less Napoleonic I would suggest Brave New War by John Robb.
That's the thing, I can't tell you.  Element of surprise, as they say, old boy.
Robb's Brave New War is a bit more "Jominian," in my opinion (heavier on tactics than grand strategy), but an interesting read nonetheless.
 

vamrat

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Cognomen said:
vamrat said:
Cognomen said:
Jominy's Précis de l'Art de la Guerre: Des Principales Combinaisons de la Stratégie, de la Grande Tactique et de la Politique Militaire.
& Clausewitz' On War.
Who are you planning on invading?  I have Vom Krieg on my shelf and have indeed cracked the binding, but I cannot admit to having read it thoroughly.  When you finish and want something less Napoleonic I would suggest Brave New War by John Robb.
That's the thing, I can't tell you.  Element of surprise, as they say, old boy.
Robb's Brave New War is a bit more "Jominian," in my opinion (heavier on tactics than grand strategy), but an interesting read nonetheless.
His blog (Global Guerrillas) gets more into the strategy, though still not army level strategy, more non-state actor level strategy.
 

Asteriktos

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The Brothers Karamazov, by Fyodor Dostoevsky (tr. Constance Garnett)

Also requested Heidegger's Being and Time through interlibrary loan. When I mentioned the request to someone I know, who is interested in such things, she just groaned as a flood of memories of being frustrated with that work came to her.  :D
 

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A History of Modern Russia: From Tsarism to the Twenty-First Century], Third Edition / by Robert Service
 

orthonorm

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Asteriktos said:
The Brothers Karamazov, by Fyodor Dostoevsky (tr. Constance Garnett)

Also requested Heidegger's Being and Time through interlibrary loan. When I mentioned the request to someone I know, who is interested in such things, she just groaned as a flood of memories of being frustrated with that work came to her.  :D
I would highly recommend Dreyfus' Being-in-the-World: A Commentary on Heidegger's Being and Time, Division I to any and all who attempt to read this work alone and without much background.

Dreyfus' is a pugilist on the basic tennets in the first division upon which 98% of the rest of all Contemporary Philosophy hang (some hyperbole here, but not much). It can get somewhat tiresome, but it is for the most part the result of an Anglo-American trying to come to terms with the end of his own tradition and its futile attempts at progression. So some things are repeated over and over.

But perhaps for the best as these "simple" insight probably are the most confounding or "obvious" and need putting into context, especially those not familiar at all with Continental Thought. He also does a good job at giving alternate translations to some of the key terms in Being and Time, which I think can be at time better than both critical versions in English translation.

The appendices can go the way of the trash can. Primarily written by a student, they attempt to address the "sexier" parts of B&T that caught the eye of the "Existentialists" looking backward from Being and Nothingness. They do Heidegger and Kierkegaard harm and no good.

This is a true intro which can and perhaps ought to be read before approaching the Kraut.

If you do get B&T, please let me know, as there are substantial portions in the beginning which are going to be gibberish to someone who hasn't studied Phenomenology in depth and they are not needed to grasp the key questions Heidegger raises within the text. Often folks give up during them when reading it for "edification". They shouldn't. They should just skip them. Those sections on Phenomenology are startling if placed within the proper relationship to Husserl and the Western understanding of phenomena from time immemorial, but again not for non-expert reader. A necessary piece of writing from a student making his case for such a violent and shocking break from his mentor.

If you get especially jazzed by the work and wonder how in the world any  genius wrote such a work in a ski hut in less than a month, then the following is an incredible piece of scholarship for the lay person and scholar alike:

The Genesis of Heidegger's Being and Time by Theodore Kisiel.

Links to Dreyfus' and Kisiel's works:

http://www.amazon.com/Being-World-Commentary-Heideggers-Division/dp/0262540568/ref=pd_sim_b4

http://www.amazon.com/Genesis-Heideggers-Being-Time/dp/0520201590

 

 

Volnutt

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Is it worth the effort to try to get into Hegel at all?
 

IsmiLiora

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Starting back on my Orthodoxy reading. Reading some stuff about the Desert Fathers and looking through James R. Payton's Light from the Christian East: An Introduction to the Orthodox Tradition. Mr. Ismi has some big-time misunderstandings about the Church and I'm looking for a good book written about the faith vis-a-vis the Protestants so he gets what they are talking about. And of course I still have more to learn myself, even in the basics, so why not?
 

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IsmiLiora said:
Starting back on my Orthodoxy reading. Reading some stuff about the Desert Fathers and looking through James R. Payton's Light from the Christian East: An Introduction to the Orthodox Tradition. Mr. Ismi has some big-time misunderstandings about the Church and I'm looking for a good book written about the faith vis-a-vis the Protestants so he gets what they are talking about. And of course I still have more to learn myself, even in the basics, so why not?
Has Mr. Ismi tried reading, Eastern Orthodoxy Through Western Eyes / by Donald Fairbairn?  I highly recommend that book for a Protestant to Orthodox journey.
 

IsmiLiora

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No, but I will check that out soon! Thank you so much. I have had other recommendations from this post, too, and I will be looking at all of them. I deeply appreciate it.

Liora
 

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Scored at the used-book store: The Medieval Cookbook by Maggie Black. Perfect companion book to Christmas Feasts from History that I already have.
 

elijahmaria

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Have you read much of Gadamer or Edith Stein?

M.

orthonorm said:
Asteriktos said:
The Brothers Karamazov, by Fyodor Dostoevsky (tr. Constance Garnett)

Also requested Heidegger's Being and Time through interlibrary loan. When I mentioned the request to someone I know, who is interested in such things, she just groaned as a flood of memories of being frustrated with that work came to her.  :D
I would highly recommend Dreyfus' Being-in-the-World: A Commentary on Heidegger's Being and Time, Division I to any and all who attempt to read this work alone and without much background.

Dreyfus' is a pugilist on the basic tennets in the first division upon which 98% of the rest of all Contemporary Philosophy hang (some hyperbole here, but not much). It can get somewhat tiresome, but it is for the most part the result of an Anglo-American trying to come to terms with the end of his own tradition and its futile attempts at progression. So some things are repeated over and over.

But perhaps for the best as these "simple" insight probably are the most confounding or "obvious" and need putting into context, especially those not familiar at all with Continental Thought. He also does a good job at giving alternate translations to some of the key terms in Being and Time, which I think can be at time better than both critical versions in English translation.

The appendices can go the way of the trash can. Primarily written by a student, they attempt to address the "sexier" parts of B&T that caught the eye of the "Existentialists" looking backward from Being and Nothingness. They do Heidegger and Kierkegaard harm and no good.

This is a true intro which can and perhaps ought to be read before approaching the Kraut.

If you do get B&T, please let me know, as there are substantial portions in the beginning which are going to be gibberish to someone who hasn't studied Phenomenology in depth and they are not needed to grasp the key questions Heidegger raises within the text. Often folks give up during them when reading it for "edification". They shouldn't. They should just skip them. Those sections on Phenomenology are startling if placed within the proper relationship to Husserl and the Western understanding of phenomena from time immemorial, but again not for non-expert reader. A necessary piece of writing from a student making his case for such a violent and shocking break from his mentor.

If you get especially jazzed by the work and wonder how in the world any  genius wrote such a work in a ski hut in less than a month, then the following is an incredible piece of scholarship for the lay person and scholar alike:

The Genesis of Heidegger's Being and Time by Theodore Kisiel.

Links to Dreyfus' and Kisiel's works:

http://www.amazon.com/Being-World-Commentary-Heideggers-Division/dp/0262540568/ref=pd_sim_b4

http://www.amazon.com/Genesis-Heideggers-Being-Time/dp/0520201590

   
 

orthonorm

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elijahmaria said:
Have you read much of Gadamer or Edith Stein?

M.
A lot of Gadamer? More than most people I would imagine. //:=)

Yes. Really Gadamer is just filling out Heidegger's understanding hermeneutics for the most part. I respect Gadamer a lot and could on about him forever.

Edith Stein, not so much, given her Thomistic turn. However she is one person in a line of many who, if people care about biography, show Heidegger out to be an @$$. Stein, Arendt, Celan . . . but not nearly the @$$ people want him to be.

Frankly I don't care much about biography as such and don't find it too informative in reading anything other than just more context and usually as meaningful as what I had for breakfast.

I wondered why you would have an interest in the above so looked into Edith Stein wikipage. I didn't realize how her life was lived out.

Lord have mercy on her.


 
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