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What languages do we speak on OC.net?

What language(s) can you speak/write in (does not need to be fluent)?

  • English

    Votes: 195 88.2%
  • Greek

    Votes: 54 24.4%
  • A Slavic Language

    Votes: 56 25.3%
  • Romanian

    Votes: 11 5.0%
  • Spanish/Spanish Derivitive

    Votes: 58 26.2%
  • Romance (Italian, French, etc)

    Votes: 68 30.8%
  • German/Germanic

    Votes: 51 23.1%
  • Swahili/African

    Votes: 4 1.8%
  • Arabic

    Votes: 24 10.9%
  • Coptic

    Votes: 7 3.2%
  • Klingon/Binary/Other Artificial Language

    Votes: 21 9.5%
  • Not listed. Boo!

    Votes: 65 29.4%

  • Total voters
    221

DeniseDenise

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RaphaCam said:
So what would be your picks for really hard to translate words?
"Saudade" is often described as an extremely difficult concept to convey outside Portuguese language, but its overall meaning can usually be conveyed by "missing/longing/nostalgia". I like "cafuné", which means fondling the top of the head. "Endomingado" isn't such a common word, but I like how it may mean either "dressed up as for Sunday mass" or "depressed because it's Sunday".

I think Saudade can also be easily translated as wistful.....'having or showing a feeling of vague or regretful longing'


for me a better 'untranslatable' thing is dar um jeito.....which has way more subtleties than the dictionary allows for....
 

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RaphaCam said:
Lepanto said:
I can offer Bavarian, a German dialect which can be so strong as to be unintelligible by standard German speakers. Unfortunately, most of the youth no longer can speak it properly.
Schaud ned guad aus...
I love Austro-Bavarian, it's my favourite German dialect! Very sad to hear from you that it has disappeared among youth.  :( Are you aware if it's the same situation on Austria or the Bavarian countryside...? I'm even sadder by the loss of Low German, which is so unique and has such a long tradition.

I can only offer fake Bavarian, like barely pronouncing "b/d/g", or putting a lot of "a" on words.
It is somewhat better in Austria and rural Bavaria, still very much in decline.
I can speak it really well, I think, but when I talk to my grandfather, I realize how much I have been influenced by English and standard German.
I'd love to hear you speak fake Bavarian :D
 

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DeniseDenise said:
for me a better 'untranslatable' thing is dar um jeito.....which has way more subtleties than the dictionary allows for....
Never thought about that, but indeed.

Lepanto said:
I'd love to hear you speak fake Bavarian :D
Wia keat's, freind? (how are you, friend? in fake Bavarian)
 

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RaphaCam said:
DeniseDenise said:
for me a better 'untranslatable' thing is dar um jeito.....which has way more subtleties than the dictionary allows for....
Never thought about that, but indeed.

Lepanto said:
I'd love to hear you speak fake Bavarian :D
Wia keat's, freind? (how are you, friend? in fake Bavarian)
Rapha, you made my day! Awesome!
 

Volnutt

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Is there any good reason to learn an auxlang and/or interlang? I was thinking about Toki Pona since it's so quick to pick up, but it feels like it's still wasted effort that I could put towards learning a natural language.
 

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Volnutt said:
Is there any good reason to learn an auxlang and/or interlang? I was thinking about Toki Pona since it's so quick to pick up, but it feels like it's still wasted effort that I could put towards learning a natural language.
Toki Pona is nice to train your logical skills. I imagine the same can be said of Lojban or Ithkuil for very different reasons. Esperanto, however, is nowadays just a display of ultimate geekiness, although it had such strong political connotations decades ago.
 

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Yeah, that's what I was kind of thinking, myself.
 

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If I still had patience for useless languages (and by useless I mean those that don't give me access to new texts, media or people), I'd go for Ithkuil. Of course, as long as I wasn't too focused on Irish.  :laugh:
 

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Fun fact, not even Quijada is actually fluent in it.

As for Irish, there's plenty of old texts to read and Irish TV shows you could watch it in. I'd like to learn it too someday, for the sake of getting back to my roots.

I think the general "bucket list" order for me going forward is:

German (already middling skill, needs a lot of improvement)
Polish
Church Slavonic
Spanish
Latin
Ancient Greek
Irish
Amharic
Russian
Georgian
Arabic
Armenian
Japanese
Some Alaska Native language, I can't decide, maybe Tlingit.
Hawaiian

Wichita and Lashootseed also fascinate me as languages that almost completely lack labial sounds, but they're both super dead (I mean, so are Latin and Koine, but it's a bit different, isn't it?) I also don't know how well received a white boy trying to learn Native languages would be in general.
 

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Volnutt said:
Wichita and Lashootseed also fascinate me as languages that almost completely lack labial sounds, but they're both super dead (I mean, so are Latin and Koine, but it's a bit different, isn't it?) I also don't know how well received a white boy trying to learn Native languages would be in general.
I know this is the "Tumblr fringe," but I also can't help but wonder how common this attitude is out there (good reply roasts, though) :-\

 

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Found in the youtube comments on a video about hard languages-

"Speaking polish is unhealthy for your tongue and teeth"

Serious? Joking? No idea lol!

Another comment- "Even Saying "I love you" in Polish feels Like Killing someone 😂"



 

Dominika

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Volnutt said:
Another comment- "Even Saying "I love you" in Polish feels Like Killing someone 😂"
It's about German, not Polish.
 

Volnutt

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Maybe Ich liebst du is a stab and Kocham cię is an axe chop, lol?
 

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RaphaCam said:
Native languages of Francophone Africa don't have clicks, but I'm sure this misses the point of the meme.  :p
Yeah, I hate it when somebody counters ignorance with ignorance (also, while Taa has 100+ clicks, none of them are all clicks). Beyond that, it was a good roast.
 

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Any Tanzanian fans of Return of the Jedi probably have a favorite character in Nien Nunb, the co-pilot of the Millennium Falcon that helps Lando Calrissian blow up the second Death Star, who spoke the language of the Haya people native to the east African country. It’s called Sullustese in the Star Wars universe.

Kipsang Rotich, the Kenyan actor who voiced Nunb in the movie, became a minor celebrity in his home country after his voice was heard in what was then the final movie of the Star Wars saga. Rotich was recently tracked down to potentially voice Nunb again in The Force Awakens. Expect to hear some more Haya language in Star Wars again very soon.
https://www.inverse.com/article/8880-star-wars-languages-owe-to-tibetan-finnish-haya-quechua-and-penguins
I admit to being uneasy with wholesale borrowing, even as I find myself taking inspiration from the (Wikipedia articles on) grammars and phonologies of various real world languages for my novel's conlang, like Tolkien did. At least it was Rotich's choice and he was well-received for it back home, I guess. Better than just using Quechua as Huttese because it's allegedly obscure (which it's not) lol.

I'm honestly not sure how I'd feel if I was a speaker of a minority language (especially an endangered one) and I found out that someone in Hollywood was using it for aliens. :/
 

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Right now,

I'm forming sentence structures in Mixed English.
 

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RaphaCam

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Volnutt said:
No because the song doesn't include the roots so you could mix up stuff in the future, but otherwise yes.

BTW, that's a real problem in teaching dead languages. There was a lot of advancement in second language acquisition at least since Maximilian Berlitz, but people still teach Latin or Ancient Greek in a pretty... dead method.
 

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RaphaCam said:
Volnutt said:
No because the song doesn't include the roots so you could mix up stuff in the future, but otherwise yes.

BTW, that's a real problem in teaching dead languages. There was a lot of advancement in second language acquisition at least since Maximilian Berlitz, but people still teach Latin or Ancient Greek in a pretty... dead method.
Indeed... Tables, tables and tables. Both for Latin and Koine in my experience. Plus some sentences from Bible or poetry.
 

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Volnutt said:
Fun fact, not even Quijada is actually fluent in it.

As for Irish, there's plenty of old texts to read and Irish TV shows you could watch it in. I'd like to learn it too someday, for the sake of getting back to my roots.

I think the general "bucket list" order for me going forward is:

German (already middling skill, needs a lot of improvement)
Polish
Church Slavonic
Spanish
Latin
Ancient Greek
Irish
Amharic
Russian
Georgian
Arabic
Armenian
Japanese
Some Alaska Native language, I can't decide, maybe Tlingit.
Hawaiian

Wichita and Lashootseed also fascinate me as languages that almost completely lack labial sounds, but they're both super dead (I mean, so are Latin and Koine, but it's a bit different, isn't it?) I also don't know how well received a white boy trying to learn Native languages would be in general.
With the Biblical languages, learn them well enough to be dangerous on your own and then just use a lexicon.
 

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In addition to contemporary American English, I also speak fluent Coonass and can communicate to people who speak Delta Mumble.
 

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The only languages I still wish to learn are Mandarin Chinese, Modern Standard Arabic and Russian. There are many more I'd like to study, but I wouldn't really dedicate myself more than maybe browsing a grammar out of curiosity.
 

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RaphaCam said:
I perceive modern languages, typically formed in large cities were people from all over the world have an urgent need for basic communication in the local language causing it to simplify, omit the intellectual stuff that would be necessary for supporting a successful civilization. I understand that you wish to communicate with contemporaries, but I can't get myself to prefer modern over legacy.

RaphaCam said:
Some people like unity a lot. I like dialects because they decentralise the thought process of society to the point where people become enpowered to make their own lives meaningful.

RaphaCam said:
I had joined the choir for a while in the local parish of socialist Svenska Kyrkan (the Swedish Church), and one evening after we had practiced, a lady in her 70:ies invited the four of us who were aged below 40 to a cup of coffee at her place. She had participated in the churche's programme to welcome, guide and teach immigrants and related that they had behaved "worse than the 'racists' had warned", with regard to sexual harassment.

We talked about many other things and as I found a dictionary in her library that I browsed through with interest, she asked about my language studies and what languages I would try to teach myself in the future. I responded that when I bought Brown-Driver-Briggs Hebrew-English lexicon and began to learn Hebrew and Syriac I promised myself that I would never have to study Arabic. It would be too much work, especially since Arabic is spoken in some twenty sovereign countries and therefor has a lot of synonyms and varieties. However, as more and more people around me spoke Arabic I could no longer afford to ignore it, so I would begin to teach myself some basics in a couple of weeks.

Her reaction surprised me a bit. She looked really sad and not triumphant or haughty as women usually are when lads mention their problems. I i r c, she had at least one son, and I thought I may have helped her understand his situation as well.

As we went home, I was glad that there was at least one woman among my acquaintances who was sympathetic towards my minorities. Unfortunately, this didn't last long. She made suicide next week.
 

Ariend

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Mandarin Chinese. Well, still learning it. Mandarin Chinese is pretty underrated considering it's the most spoken language in the world (albeit only in a few countries).
I also live in California, so I know some good Spanish. Being Orthodox I also know some Greek and Russian. Also some German because of my heritage. Also some French because of my future plans to travel to France. I hope to learn some liturgical Arabic later, being Antiochian and all  ;D
 

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Ariend said:
I hope to learn some liturgical Arabic later, being Antiochian and all  ;D
Actually, there is no "liturgical" Arabic. It's just Arabic that's used for writing, official occassions and for basics in teaching foreirgners Arabic and its dialects.
 

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Dominika said:
Actually, there is no "liturgical" Arabic. It's just Arabic that's used for writing, official occassions and for basics in teaching foreirgners Arabic and its dialects.
I would say that liturgical Arabic is its own stylistic register that does sound somewhat quirky if you're not used to it. If you pay really close attention, you can occasionally catch Syriacisms in some hymns that were translated from Syriac originally-- using 'min' to express the agent of a passive, for example (in good Classical Arabic there's no way to express that, while in modern newspaper-language you say 'min qibal').
 

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Samn! said:
Dominika said:
Actually, there is no "liturgical" Arabic. It's just Arabic that's used for writing, official occassions and for basics in teaching foreirgners Arabic and its dialects.
I would say that liturgical Arabic is its own stylistic register that does sound somewhat quirky if you're not used to it. If you pay really close attention, you can occasionally catch Syriacisms in some hymns that were translated from Syriac originally-- using 'min' to express the agent of a passive, for example (in good Classical Arabic there's no way to express that, while in modern newspaper-language you say 'min qibal').
Do you remember any example?
Maybe because I don't know Syriac, I can't 'catch' such things...
 

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Dominika said:
Samn! said:
Dominika said:
Actually, there is no "liturgical" Arabic. It's just Arabic that's used for writing, official occassions and for basics in teaching foreirgners Arabic and its dialects.
I would say that liturgical Arabic is its own stylistic register that does sound somewhat quirky if you're not used to it. If you pay really close attention, you can occasionally catch Syriacisms in some hymns that were translated from Syriac originally-- using 'min' to express the agent of a passive, for example (in good Classical Arabic there's no way to express that, while in modern newspaper-language you say 'min qibal').
Do you remember any example?
Maybe because I don't know Syriac, I can't 'catch' such things...
So like in the troparion for the Resurrection, when it says إنّ الحجرلمّا خُتِم من اليهود saying من اليهود to express the agent of the passive verb خُتِم wouldn't be possible in normal literary Arabic but is normal in Syriac.

There are also quirks of liturgical Arabic that go back to the earliest translations from Greek. The ما يُرى وما لا يُرى of the Creed for "visible and invisible" is at the very least inelegant, if not just plain weird, in good Arabic style, but it's been in the text since the first translation from the beginning of the 9th century. It's worth noting that the text we use of the Creed, the Our Father and even to a certain extent the Psalms all go back to the earliest attempts at translating Greek into Arabic and were contemporary to the beginning of the invention of Classical Arabic proper, hundreds of kilometers away in Iraq.
 

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Samn! said:
So like in the troparion for the Resurrection, when it says إنّ الحجرلمّا خُتِم من اليهود saying من اليهود to express the agent of the passive verb خُتِم wouldn't be possible in normal literary Arabic but is normal in Syriac.
Ah! I've treated it "normally" because it's actually the same structure as in the Church Slavonic and to first line of this troparion in this language I'm used to.

Samn! said:
There are also quirks of liturgical Arabic that go back to the earliest translations from Greek. The ما يُرى وما لا يُرى of the Creed for "visible and invisible" is at the very least inelegant, if not just plain weird, in good Arabic style, but it's been in the text since the first translation from the beginning of the 9th century. It's worth noting that the text we use of the Creed, the Our Father and even to a certain extent the Psalms all go back to the earliest attempts at translating Greek into Arabic and were contemporary to the beginning of the invention of Classical Arabic proper, hundreds of kilometers away in Iraq.
Oh yeah, this verse indeed sounds strange while recitation.

Thanks, now I'll be more 'vigilant' ;)
 

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sestir said:
RaphaCam said:
I perceive modern languages, typically formed in large cities were people from all over the world have an urgent need for basic communication in the local language causing it to simplify, omit the intellectual stuff that would be necessary for supporting a successful civilization. I understand that you wish to communicate with contemporaries, but I can't get myself to prefer modern over legacy.

RaphaCam said:
Some people like unity a lot. I like dialects because they decentralise the thought process of society to the point where people become enpowered to make their own lives meaningful.

RaphaCam said:
I had joined the choir for a while in the local parish of socialist Svenska Kyrkan (the Swedish Church), and one evening after we had practiced, a lady in her 70:ies invited the four of us who were aged below 40 to a cup of coffee at her place. She had participated in the churche's programme to welcome, guide and teach immigrants and related that they had behaved "worse than the 'racists' had warned", with regard to sexual harassment.

We talked about many other things and as I found a dictionary in her library that I browsed through with interest, she asked about my language studies and what languages I would try to teach myself in the future. I responded that when I bought Brown-Driver-Briggs Hebrew-English lexicon and began to learn Hebrew and Syriac I promised myself that I would never have to study Arabic. It would be too much work, especially since Arabic is spoken in some twenty sovereign countries and therefor has a lot of synonyms and varieties. However, as more and more people around me spoke Arabic I could no longer afford to ignore it, so I would begin to teach myself some basics in a couple of weeks.

Her reaction surprised me a bit. She looked really sad and not triumphant or haughty as women usually are when lads mention their problems. I i r c, she had at least one son, and I thought I may have helped her understand his situation as well.

As we went home, I was glad that there was at least one woman among my acquaintances who was sympathetic towards my minorities. Unfortunately, this didn't last long. She made suicide next week.
I'm so sorry :'(
 

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Speaking of Ithkuil, I had no idea that this happened lol! Rapha, did you?
 

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I'm really into Arabic dialects and I'd love to dive into Lebanese Arabic and get something in Classical (which is too similar to MSA to be studied apart), and I actually considered taking a dialect first, but Nika talked me out of it. :p So sorry about what happened, though... We never know what's in people's hearts.

Samn! said:
Dominika said:
Samn! said:
Dominika said:
Actually, there is no "liturgical" Arabic. It's just Arabic that's used for writing, official occassions and for basics in teaching foreirgners Arabic and its dialects.
I would say that liturgical Arabic is its own stylistic register that does sound somewhat quirky if you're not used to it. If you pay really close attention, you can occasionally catch Syriacisms in some hymns that were translated from Syriac originally-- using 'min' to express the agent of a passive, for example (in good Classical Arabic there's no way to express that, while in modern newspaper-language you say 'min qibal').
Do you remember any example?
Maybe because I don't know Syriac, I can't 'catch' such things...
So like in the troparion for the Resurrection, when it says إنّ الحجرلمّا خُتِم من اليهود saying من اليهود to express the agent of the passive verb خُتِم wouldn't be possible in normal literary Arabic but is normal in Syriac.

There are also quirks of liturgical Arabic that go back to the earliest translations from Greek. The ما يُرى وما لا يُرى of the Creed for "visible and invisible" is at the very least inelegant, if not just plain weird, in good Arabic style, but it's been in the text since the first translation from the beginning of the 9th century. It's worth noting that the text we use of the Creed, the Our Father and even to a certain extent the Psalms all go back to the earliest attempts at translating Greek into Arabic and were contemporary to the beginning of the invention of Classical Arabic proper, hundreds of kilometers away in Iraq.
That's all really interesting... I love this kind of "intrusion".

Volnutt said:
Speaking of Ithkuil, I had no idea that this happened lol! Rapha, did you?
Which part, the one of Ithkuil suddenly invading Rusnet? No, but it's nice!
 

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RaphaCam said:
Which part, the one of Ithkuil suddenly invading Rusnet? No, but it's nice!
Yeah lol. I wonder if those people are still operating. It sounds like a Russian combination of Scientology and Heaven's Gate.
 

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RaphaCam said:
Esperanto was also spread among a not far less quirky community.  :-X
Yeah, but the Esperantists always struck me as mostly wooly headed, Very NiceTM bourgeois liberals (case in point, George Soros). I'm sure there's a lot of overlap in the psychoneticists, but they also seem a bit more militant and conspiracy theory minded. Maybe I've got an obstructed view, though.
 

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That's true nowadays, but the Esperanto movement was very strange in its first years and still nowadays particularly in Brazil there are some "Esperanto is spoken in heaven" weirdos around.
 
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