• A blessed Nativity / Theophany season to all! For users new and old: the forum rules were streamlined when we transitioned to the new software. Please ensure that you are familiar with them. Continued use of the forum means that you (a) know the rules, and (b) pledge that you'll abide by them. For more information, check out the OrthodoxChristianity.Net Rules section. (There are only 2 threads there - Rules, and Administrative Structure.)

What movies are you watching?

Achronos

Toumarches
Site Supporter
Joined
Oct 31, 2010
Messages
13,265
Reaction score
1
Points
0
Location
House Of Balloons
Who can agree with me that Roger Ebert is overrated and never had anything original to say?

Yes? Yes??

Pauline Kael was a much better critic in everyway eventhough her taste's and mine conflict.
 

orthonorm

Hoplitarches
Joined
Jul 24, 2010
Messages
17,715
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Romaios said:
There is non-American cinema: Swedish, Russian, Polish, Czech, Asian, French, Italian, Spanish, Greek, Iranian, Israeli...
What's your point? Other than making part of mine? The Platinum Years was Weimar. The Golden, Hollywood. And whatever people moan about today is Global and transnational. I doubt most people have more than a five films from a dozen different countries or transnational productions over the last five years.
 

Romaios

Archon
Joined
Jun 13, 2008
Messages
2,940
Reaction score
0
Points
0
orthonorm said:
Romaios said:
There is non-American cinema: Swedish, Russian, Polish, Czech, Asian, French, Italian, Spanish, Greek, Iranian, Israeli...
What's your point? Other than making part of mine? The Platinum Years was Weimar. The Golden, Hollywood. And whatever people moan about today is Global and transnational. I doubt most people have more than a five films from a dozen different countries or transnational productions over the last five years.
I don't think Hollywood is unsurpassed at all, even if that's what most people moan about today. Great art isn't just props and money. 

Actually, if I were to make a top 10 of my all-time favourite directors, I'd have to think long and hard about an American...   
 

That person

OC.Net Guru
Joined
Dec 11, 2009
Messages
1,166
Reaction score
0
Points
0
scamandrius said:
orthonorm said:
scamandrius said:
orthonorm said:
biro said:
scamandrius said:
I've been really getting into Hitchcock lately.  Recently watched or rewatched
The Man Who Knew Too Much
Dial M for Murder
Vertigo


They really DON'T make them like these anymore...unfortunately.
Hitchcock is really good.
This is true, but thankfully they don't make em like that anymore. On the whole movies are much better.
Are you kidding?  You're probably one of the people who thinks that CGI and cool Michael Bayesque explosions are what make movies great.  God forbid that movies anymore have plot, plot twists, character development, good dialogue, etc.  Hell, you probably think Phantom Menace is the best movie ever made.
You really haven't seen my posts about how netflix describes my taste.

But hey, sounding like you're a clueless old man around passes around here for street cred, so enjoy. I would suggest acting your age and maybe actually looking at cinema of the last 25 years and on the whole comparing it to the era of Hitchcock. Just like TV, we are way better off on the whole. Way.

Like way.
So, could you recap your posts on Netflix so I don't have to read them?  I didn't know those were required reading.

BTW, what is it lately about the "old man" comments?  Do you have something against old people?  I'm 37, and that's not old.  And by "act your age" does that mean display contempt for anything that came before I existed?

Before getting into more name calling on a public thread, why don't you enlighten me (and others) as to the criteria which, in your mind, make movies great and how those criteria have been used over the past 25 years (lets use 1990 as a terminus post quem) to elevate movie-making both in general and specifically over movies that were made pre-1990.
Off the top of my head, orthonorm has spoken quite highly of Tree of Life, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, and Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai. By contrast, even as a fan of Joss Whedon, he has a pretty negative assessment of The Avengers. This is less about how you should have a detailed knowledge of his taste in films, and more about how silly it is to assume anyone who prefers modern movies to older ones is all about spectacle and flash. That's a really, really absurd leap to make. Spectacle and flash and SFX showcases have been a part of movies for a very long time, but they've never been the only things being made, unless you want to go really early back in the history of film.
 

Iconodule

Hoplitarches
Joined
Jan 2, 2010
Messages
16,486
Reaction score
9
Points
38
Age
38
Location
PA, USA
That person said:
scamandrius said:
orthonorm said:
scamandrius said:
orthonorm said:
biro said:
scamandrius said:
I've been really getting into Hitchcock lately.  Recently watched or rewatched
The Man Who Knew Too Much
Dial M for Murder
Vertigo


They really DON'T make them like these anymore...unfortunately.
Hitchcock is really good.
This is true, but thankfully they don't make em like that anymore. On the whole movies are much better.
Are you kidding?  You're probably one of the people who thinks that CGI and cool Michael Bayesque explosions are what make movies great.  God forbid that movies anymore have plot, plot twists, character development, good dialogue, etc.  Hell, you probably think Phantom Menace is the best movie ever made.
You really haven't seen my posts about how netflix describes my taste.

But hey, sounding like you're a clueless old man around passes around here for street cred, so enjoy. I would suggest acting your age and maybe actually looking at cinema of the last 25 years and on the whole comparing it to the era of Hitchcock. Just like TV, we are way better off on the whole. Way.

Like way.
So, could you recap your posts on Netflix so I don't have to read them?  I didn't know those were required reading.

BTW, what is it lately about the "old man" comments?  Do you have something against old people?  I'm 37, and that's not old.  And by "act your age" does that mean display contempt for anything that came before I existed?

Before getting into more name calling on a public thread, why don't you enlighten me (and others) as to the criteria which, in your mind, make movies great and how those criteria have been used over the past 25 years (lets use 1990 as a terminus post quem) to elevate movie-making both in general and specifically over movies that were made pre-1990.
Off the top of my head, orthonorm has spoken quite highly of Tree of Life, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, and Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai. By contrast, even as a fan of Joss Whedon, he has a pretty negative assessment of The Avengers. This is less about how you should have a detailed knowledge of his taste in films, and more about how silly it is to assume anyone who prefers modern movies to older ones is all about spectacle and flash. That's a really, really absurd leap to make. Spectacle and flash and SFX showcases have been a part of movies for a very long time, but they've never been the only things being made, unless you want to go really early back in the history of film.
Obviously Scamandrius only cares about claymation dinosaurs and aliens.
 

vamrat

Merarches
Joined
Jun 4, 2010
Messages
9,471
Reaction score
0
Points
36
Age
36
Location
Omaha
That person said:
scamandrius said:
orthonorm said:
scamandrius said:
orthonorm said:
biro said:
scamandrius said:
I've been really getting into Hitchcock lately.  Recently watched or rewatched
The Man Who Knew Too Much
Dial M for Murder
Vertigo


They really DON'T make them like these anymore...unfortunately.
Hitchcock is really good.
This is true, but thankfully they don't make em like that anymore. On the whole movies are much better.
Are you kidding?  You're probably one of the people who thinks that CGI and cool Michael Bayesque explosions are what make movies great.  God forbid that movies anymore have plot, plot twists, character development, good dialogue, etc.  Hell, you probably think Phantom Menace is the best movie ever made.
You really haven't seen my posts about how netflix describes my taste.

But hey, sounding like you're a clueless old man around passes around here for street cred, so enjoy. I would suggest acting your age and maybe actually looking at cinema of the last 25 years and on the whole comparing it to the era of Hitchcock. Just like TV, we are way better off on the whole. Way.

Like way.
So, could you recap your posts on Netflix so I don't have to read them?  I didn't know those were required reading.

BTW, what is it lately about the "old man" comments?  Do you have something against old people?  I'm 37, and that's not old.  And by "act your age" does that mean display contempt for anything that came before I existed?

Before getting into more name calling on a public thread, why don't you enlighten me (and others) as to the criteria which, in your mind, make movies great and how those criteria have been used over the past 25 years (lets use 1990 as a terminus post quem) to elevate movie-making both in general and specifically over movies that were made pre-1990.
Off the top of my head, orthonorm has spoken quite highly of Tree of Life, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, and Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai. By contrast, even as a fan of Joss Whedon, he has a pretty negative assessment of The Avengers. This is less about how you should have a detailed knowledge of his taste in films, and more about how silly it is to assume anyone who prefers modern movies to older ones is all about spectacle and flash. That's a really, really absurd leap to make. Spectacle and flash and SFX showcases have been a part of movies for a very long time, but they've never been the only things being made, unless you want to go really early back in the history of film.
The Way of the Samurai was pretty good. 

As for Joss Whedon, I really liked Firefly, though I think it would have been better to have had a couple more seasons than the movie Serenity.  It was ok, don't get me wrong, but developing the Shepherd more would have been wonderful and there was lot more they could have done between Reynolds and Inara.  Despite Firefly, I am not ready to sacrifice the virginity of any future daughters I might have on the altar of Joss Whedon.
 

vamrat

Merarches
Joined
Jun 4, 2010
Messages
9,471
Reaction score
0
Points
36
Age
36
Location
Omaha
As for older movies, Zulu, The Wild Geese, A Bridge too Far, and Conan the Barbarian are some of my favorite movies.  There have been few modern ones that I like more.  Maybe 9th Company.  Perhaps some others will grow on me over time to the point that I like them as much.
 

Hawkeye

Hyperprōtopansebastohalieus
Joined
Aug 15, 2013
Messages
1,078
Reaction score
9
Points
38
Location
Shores Where Seas Break Backs
I just saw The Trials of Muhammad Ali. I wasn't sure how I'd feel about it going in but I came out rather satisfied.

I didn't feel like it had a strong enough conclusion but that may just be because it's a documentary, which, in my experience, tend not to lend themselves well in such regards.

I'd recommend it to anyone interested in the life and times of the boxer formerly known as Cassius Marcellus Clay.
 

Arachne

Matriarch
Staff member
Moderator
Site Supporter
Joined
Dec 22, 2012
Messages
12,289
Reaction score
174
Points
63
Age
48
Location
Camulodunum
I'll (probably) be watching Planes together with the young one after school.
 

Gebre Menfes Kidus

Merarches
Joined
Feb 3, 2009
Messages
10,800
Reaction score
9
Points
0
Age
52
Location
Jackson, MS
Website
www.facebook.com
Hawkeye said:
I just saw The Trials of Muhammad Ali. I wasn't sure how I'd feel about it going in but I came out rather satisfied.

I didn't feel like it had a strong enough conclusion but that may just be because it's a documentary, which, in my experience, tend not to lend themselves well in such regards.

I'd recommend it to anyone interested in the life and times of the boxer formerly known as Cassius Marcellus Clay.
Cool. I've been wanting to see it, but I don't get those cable channels. One of my heroes. Ali certainly had his flaws, but such a courageous person nonetheless. He has given me strength ever since I was a little boy. I hope to meet him one day.

Selam
 

scamandrius

Merarches
Joined
Jan 22, 2006
Messages
9,377
Reaction score
1
Points
0
Age
44
Location
Omaha
Iconodule said:
That person said:
scamandrius said:
orthonorm said:
scamandrius said:
orthonorm said:
biro said:
scamandrius said:
I've been really getting into Hitchcock lately.  Recently watched or rewatched
The Man Who Knew Too Much
Dial M for Murder
Vertigo


They really DON'T make them like these anymore...unfortunately.
Hitchcock is really good.
This is true, but thankfully they don't make em like that anymore. On the whole movies are much better.
Are you kidding?  You're probably one of the people who thinks that CGI and cool Michael Bayesque explosions are what make movies great.  God forbid that movies anymore have plot, plot twists, character development, good dialogue, etc.  Hell, you probably think Phantom Menace is the best movie ever made.
You really haven't seen my posts about how netflix describes my taste.

But hey, sounding like you're a clueless old man around passes around here for street cred, so enjoy. I would suggest acting your age and maybe actually looking at cinema of the last 25 years and on the whole comparing it to the era of Hitchcock. Just like TV, we are way better off on the whole. Way.

Like way.
So, could you recap your posts on Netflix so I don't have to read them?  I didn't know those were required reading.

BTW, what is it lately about the "old man" comments?  Do you have something against old people?  I'm 37, and that's not old.  And by "act your age" does that mean display contempt for anything that came before I existed?

Before getting into more name calling on a public thread, why don't you enlighten me (and others) as to the criteria which, in your mind, make movies great and how those criteria have been used over the past 25 years (lets use 1990 as a terminus post quem) to elevate movie-making both in general and specifically over movies that were made pre-1990.
Off the top of my head, orthonorm has spoken quite highly of Tree of Life, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, and Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai. By contrast, even as a fan of Joss Whedon, he has a pretty negative assessment of The Avengers. This is less about how you should have a detailed knowledge of his taste in films, and more about how silly it is to assume anyone who prefers modern movies to older ones is all about spectacle and flash. That's a really, really absurd leap to make. Spectacle and flash and SFX showcases have been a part of movies for a very long time, but they've never been the only things being made, unless you want to go really early back in the history of film.
Obviously Scamandrius only cares about claymation dinosaurs and aliens.
Yes, obviously.
 

Luke

Taxiarches
Joined
Dec 5, 2008
Messages
7,215
Reaction score
71
Points
48
Achronos said:
Its Alfonso Cuaron, of course it's great.
I saw Gravity but wondered about a couple things which a New York Times reviewer also wondered about:
1.  The Hubble Space Telescope is about 360 miles above the earth.  The International Space Station is 200 to 220 miles above earth.  How are George and Sandra going to get from one to the other just using space suits and jet packs?

2.  Using a fire extinguisher for propellant? :-\
 

Papist

Toumarches
Joined
Aug 24, 2006
Messages
13,771
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Age
39
Location
Albuquerque, New Mexico
Gamliel said:
Achronos said:
Its Alfonso Cuaron, of course it's great.
I saw Gravity but wondered about a couple things which a New York Times reviewer also wondered about:
1.  The Hubble Space Telescope is about 360 miles above the earth.  The International Space Station is 200 to 220 miles above earth.  How are George and Sandra going to get from one to the other just using space suits and jet packs?

2.  Using a fire extinguisher for propellant? :-\
Inertia? :D
 

Luke

Taxiarches
Joined
Dec 5, 2008
Messages
7,215
Reaction score
71
Points
48
Papist said:
Gamliel said:
Achronos said:
Its Alfonso Cuaron, of course it's great.
I saw Gravity but wondered about a couple things which a New York Times reviewer also wondered about:
1.  The Hubble Space Telescope is about 360 miles above the earth.  The International Space Station is 200 to 220 miles above earth.  How are George and Sandra going to get from one to the other just using space suits and jet packs?

2.  Using a fire extinguisher for propellant? :-\
Inertia? :D
:)
 

Adela

OC.Net Guru
Joined
Aug 31, 2010
Messages
1,095
Reaction score
0
Points
0
My husband took me to see Rush, the movie about the rivalry between Nikki Lauda and James Hunt.  We recently watched Senna, about Ayrton Senna.  After this I think my husband should watch some Jane Austen movies but I might be expecting too much.
 

biro

Protostrator
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 31, 2010
Messages
23,404
Reaction score
120
Points
63
Age
47
Website
archiveofourown.org
Adela said:
My husband took me to see Rush, the movie about the rivalry between Nikki Lauda and James Hunt.  We recently watched Senna, about Ayrton Senna.  After this I think my husband should watch some Jane Austen movies but I might be expecting too much.
I can't wait to see 'Rush.' My Mom and I are going soon.  :)
 

Adela

OC.Net Guru
Joined
Aug 31, 2010
Messages
1,095
Reaction score
0
Points
0
biro said:
Adela said:
My husband took me to see Rush, the movie about the rivalry between Nikki Lauda and James Hunt.  We recently watched Senna, about Ayrton Senna.  After this I think my husband should watch some Jane Austen movies but I might be expecting too much.
I can't wait to see 'Rush.' My Mom and I are going soon.  :)
Let me know how you like it!  I thought it was pretty good.  There was one scene where I really laughed, but I won't spoil it for you.  It's the one where a car breaks down in Italy.  I liked the Nikki Lauda's character's take on life in general.
 

biro

Protostrator
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 31, 2010
Messages
23,404
Reaction score
120
Points
63
Age
47
Website
archiveofourown.org
Adela said:
biro said:
Adela said:
My husband took me to see Rush, the movie about the rivalry between Nikki Lauda and James Hunt.  We recently watched Senna, about Ayrton Senna.  After this I think my husband should watch some Jane Austen movies but I might be expecting too much.
I can't wait to see 'Rush.' My Mom and I are going soon.  :)
Let me know how you like it!  I thought it was pretty good.   There was one scene where I really laughed, but I won't spoil it for you.  It's the one where a car breaks down in Italy.   I liked the Nikki Lauda's character's take on life in general.
Awesome!
 

Gebre Menfes Kidus

Merarches
Joined
Feb 3, 2009
Messages
10,800
Reaction score
9
Points
0
Age
52
Location
Jackson, MS
Website
www.facebook.com
biro said:
Adela said:
My husband took me to see Rush, the movie about the rivalry between Nikki Lauda and James Hunt.  We recently watched Senna, about Ayrton Senna.  After this I think my husband should watch some Jane Austen movies but I might be expecting too much.
I can't wait to see 'Rush.' My Mom and I are going soon.  :)
Yep, I'm looking forward to it as well. Ron Howard films are always worth watching.


Selam
 

Arachne

Matriarch
Staff member
Moderator
Site Supporter
Joined
Dec 22, 2012
Messages
12,289
Reaction score
174
Points
63
Age
48
Location
Camulodunum
Adela said:
My husband took me to see Rush, the movie about the rivalry between Nikki Lauda and James Hunt.  We recently watched Senna, about Ayrton Senna.  After this I think my husband should watch some Jane Austen movies but I might be expecting too much.
Go for the 1995 BBC Pride and Prejudice miniseries, with Colin Firth and Jennifer Ehle. Longer than any of the film adaptations. ;)
 

sheenj

OC.Net Guru
Joined
Jan 31, 2012
Messages
1,429
Reaction score
0
Points
36
Age
28
Gamliel said:
Achronos said:
Its Alfonso Cuaron, of course it's great.
I saw Gravity but wondered about a couple things which a New York Times reviewer also wondered about:
1.  The Hubble Space Telescope is about 360 miles above the earth.  The International Space Station is 200 to 220 miles above earth.  How are George and Sandra going to get from one to the other just using space suits and jet packs?

2.  Using a fire extinguisher for propellant? :-\
The second one is kinda realistic, I mean, with Newton's first law and all that.
 

sheenj

OC.Net Guru
Joined
Jan 31, 2012
Messages
1,429
Reaction score
0
Points
36
Age
28
Romaios said:
Achronos said:
Romaios said:
There is non-American cinema: Swedish, Russian, Asian, French, Italian, Spanish, Greek, Iranian, Israeli...
How can you miss Bollywood??
Except for Satyajit Ray and Rooks' Siddhartha, I'm not a big fan of Indian cinema.
Whoa, Bollywood is not all that makes up Indian Cinema, it's just the Least Common Denominator. Try watching some South Indian productions, they may not be as big budget as Bollywood but they produce some good cinema.
 

Luke

Taxiarches
Joined
Dec 5, 2008
Messages
7,215
Reaction score
71
Points
48
sheenj said:
Gamliel said:
Achronos said:
Its Alfonso Cuaron, of course it's great.
I saw Gravity but wondered about a couple things which a New York Times reviewer also wondered about:
1.  The Hubble Space Telescope is about 360 miles above the earth.  The International Space Station is 200 to 220 miles above earth.  How are George and Sandra going to get from one to the other just using space suits and jet packs?

2.  Using a fire extinguisher for propellant? :-\
The second one is kinda realistic, I mean, with Newton's first law and all that.
True.  But with the control issues, I would have to see it done in reality.
 

orthonorm

Hoplitarches
Joined
Jul 24, 2010
Messages
17,715
Reaction score
0
Points
0
sheenj said:
Gamliel said:
Achronos said:
Its Alfonso Cuaron, of course it's great.
I saw Gravity but wondered about a couple things which a New York Times reviewer also wondered about:
1.  The Hubble Space Telescope is about 360 miles above the earth.  The International Space Station is 200 to 220 miles above earth.  How are George and Sandra going to get from one to the other just using space suits and jet packs?

2.  Using a fire extinguisher for propellant? :-\
The second one is kinda realistic, I mean, with Newton's first law and all that.
What do they teach in school these days?

It would be Newton's Third Law which best describes the reason for the ability to use such methods of propulsion.
 

Achronos

Toumarches
Site Supporter
Joined
Oct 31, 2010
Messages
13,265
Reaction score
1
Points
0
Location
House Of Balloons
orthonorm said:
sheenj said:
Gamliel said:
Achronos said:
Its Alfonso Cuaron, of course it's great.
I saw Gravity but wondered about a couple things which a New York Times reviewer also wondered about:
1.  The Hubble Space Telescope is about 360 miles above the earth.  The International Space Station is 200 to 220 miles above earth.  How are George and Sandra going to get from one to the other just using space suits and jet packs?

2.  Using a fire extinguisher for propellant? :-\
The second one is kinda realistic, I mean, with Newton's first law and all that.
What do they teach in school these days?

It would be Newton's Third Law which best describes the reason for the ability to use such methods of propulsion.
My coworker just said today she took a class in Chalk at college.

Seriously a class on how to use chalk on a chalkboard

I don't even know man.
 

sheenj

OC.Net Guru
Joined
Jan 31, 2012
Messages
1,429
Reaction score
0
Points
36
Age
28
orthonorm said:
sheenj said:
Gamliel said:
Achronos said:
Its Alfonso Cuaron, of course it's great.
I saw Gravity but wondered about a couple things which a New York Times reviewer also wondered about:
1.  The Hubble Space Telescope is about 360 miles above the earth.  The International Space Station is 200 to 220 miles above earth.  How are George and Sandra going to get from one to the other just using space suits and jet packs?

2.  Using a fire extinguisher for propellant? :-\
The second one is kinda realistic, I mean, with Newton's first law and all that.
What do they teach in school these days?

It would be Newton's Third Law which best describes the reason for the ability to use such methods of propulsion.
Whoops,  :-[.

In my defense, I had just woken up when I posted that.
 

Adela

OC.Net Guru
Joined
Aug 31, 2010
Messages
1,095
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Gebre Menfes Kidus said:
biro said:
Adela said:
My husband took me to see Rush, the movie about the rivalry between Nikki Lauda and James Hunt.  We recently watched Senna, about Ayrton Senna.  After this I think my husband should watch some Jane Austen movies but I might be expecting too much.
I can't wait to see 'Rush.' My Mom and I are going soon.  :)
Yep, I'm looking forward to it as well. Ron Howard films are always worth watching.


Selam
Great, I hope you enjoy it, too!  Though i must say, I would advise parents of children to see it first before taking their children. It does have an R rating, mainly because they show how extreme James Hunt lived his life.  I found out after movie that he is credited with sleeping with 3000 women. In the movie they give you an idea of what he was about in this regard.  Though, for the movie's sake, It's not the main focus of the movie and it shows how James Hunt was the polar opposite of Nikki Lauda. This plays into the movie's theme of their personal conflict.
 

Adela

OC.Net Guru
Joined
Aug 31, 2010
Messages
1,095
Reaction score
0
Points
0
Arachne said:
Adela said:
My husband took me to see Rush, the movie about the rivalry between Nikki Lauda and James Hunt.  We recently watched Senna, about Ayrton Senna.  After this I think my husband should watch some Jane Austen movies but I might be expecting too much.
Go for the 1995 BBC Pride and Prejudice miniseries, with Colin Firth and Jennifer Ehle. Longer than any of the film adaptations. ;)
Oh, I love that version!  And, also the BBC version of the 1980's!  (The 1980's one has a great Mr. Darcy  :) )  But, I imagine if I got my husband to watch it, he wouldn't last very long.  He started watching Persuasion with me ( the 1990's film version) and lasted about 10 minutes before falling asleep and snoring.  And, who wants to watch a Jane Austen movie listening to someone else snore???? Not the best.    And, he missed the best part of the movie.  The part where Captain Wentworth wrote his letter that starts "I can listen no longer in silence. I must speak to you by such means as are within my reach. You pierce my soul...."  *sigh*
 
Top